Descriptive Chess Notation


  • 7 days ago · Quote · #61

    ModestAndPolite

     Poemander says: "The only other thing you may need for meteoric rise is a mind like Jose Capablanca (observed three games at four years of age, and sat down to win three games against Dad)"

    The only evidence that Capablanca learned in that way, and won his first game against his father is his own account of it.  Do we believe it?  If he was not deliberately making it up it could easily be a false memory.  Several things cast doubt on its truth.  First that it is so unlikely that a four year old, on the basis of watching a few games, could beat even the weakest of adult players.  Second, that we do not, in general, have accurate memories from early childhood. Third, there is no end of examples of famous people in all walks of life exaggerating their achievements and experiences, or just making them up.  And finally, when you read Capablanca's account, it just does not ring true. 

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #62

    Poemander

    Many a truth does not ring true on the basis of common experience. Worse still is spin from vested interests and centuries of its effects. Every lie is a roadblock in the mind. What are we subject to? What of other "cultures", like the Jews, for instance, and their history, actively suppressed by academics since1900 and long before already contradicted. They exist and much more so. What then, is their history, if you would gainsay? I believe, as did Newton & Einstein (my idea of scientists), that the diversity of humanity is a result of reincarnation. I have met or know of people with strange stories, like memories in their childhood years of dying in the Civil War. What do we know for sure? Research in that direction is not tolerated. It would explain the recorded game by Capablanca at four years and ten months old, but nothing much else will. Neither are Edgar Cayce or Patience Worth (read "The Case of Patience Worth" by Walter Franklin Prince) to be accounted for by "mainstream" thought, if properly reasearched. "Sauron does not share power!"

       From "The Unknown Capablanca" - David Hooper, Dale Brandreth

    Game 158 Ramon Iglesias - JRC

    Havana, 17 September 1893

    (Remove White's queen)

    This is Capablanca's earliest recorded game; he was four years and ten months old and too good, even then, to receive odds of the queen. From moves 12-23 he exploits the weaknesses of White's pawn structure - is it possible that he already had a grasp of position play?

    1 P-K4 P-K4 2 N-KB3 N-KB3 3 NXP NXP 4 P-Q4 P-Q3 5 N-KB3 B-K2 6 B-Q3 N-KB3 7 P-B4 O-O 8 N-B3 N-B3 9 P-QR3 P-QR3 10 B-Q2 P-QN3 11 O-O-O B-Q2 12 K-N1 N-QR4 13 R-QB1 N-N6 14 R-B2 P-B4 15 P-Q5 R-K1 16 P-KR4 P-QN4! 17 P-N4 N-Q5 18 NxN PxN 19 N-K4 PxP 20 NxN+ BxN 21 BxBP BxNP 22 B-Q3 B-B6 23 R-R3 BxQP 24 P-R5 B-K3 25 R-N3 P-N3 26 P-B4 B-R5 27 R-N1 K-R1 28 P-B5 BxP 29 BxB PxB 30 B-R6 R-KN1 31 R2-N2 RxR 32 RxR Q-B3 33 B-N7+ QxB 34 RxQ KxR 35 K-B2 K-B3 36 K-Q3 K-K4 37 P-R6 P-B5 38 K-K2 K-K5 0-1

    Here's the same game in algebraic, if you would like to throw it through a viewer:

    [Event "Odds Game"]
    [Site "Havana"]
    [Date "1893.09.17"]
    [Round "1"]
    [White "Ramon Iglesias"]
    [Black "Jose Raul Capablanca"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "A00"]
    [FEN "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNB1KBNR w KQkq - 0 1"]

    {Setup}
    1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 Nxe4 4. d4 d6 5. Nf3 Be7 6. Bd3 Nf6 7. c4 O-O
    8. Nc3 Nc6 9. a3 a6 10. Bd2 b6 11. O-O-O Bd7 12. Kb1 Na5 13. Rc1 Nb3 14. Rc2 c5
    15. d5 Re8 16. h4 b5! 17. g4 Nd4 18. Nxd4 cxd4 19. Ne4 bxc4 20. Nxf6+ Bxf6
    21. Bxc4 Bxg4 22. Bd3 Bf3 23. Rh3 Bxd5 24. h5 Be6 25. Rg3 g6 26. f4 Bh4
    27. Rg1 Kh8 28. f5 Bxf5 29. Bxf5 gxf5 30. Bh6 Rg8 31. Rcg2 Rxg2 32. Rxg2 Qf6
    33. Bg7+ Qxg7 34. Rxg7 Kxg7 35. Kc2 Kf6 36. Kd3 Ke5 37. h6 f4 38. Ke2 Ke4 0-1

       To assess the playing strength of Ramon Iglesias we have the following
    record, in another treasure, using descriptive notation, lost to posterity without the Latin of the Past Masters. Note that this time Ramon Iglesias is the one given "Odds", in the form of playing a blindfolded opponent.

       From "Pillsbury's Chess Career" - P.W.Sergeant and W.H.Watts
                  GAME No. 195.
                     _____
              HAVANA, 17TH March, 1900.
                     Ruy Lopez.
        WHITE     BLACK       WHITE     BLACK  
       IGLESIAS PILLSBURY    IGLESIAS PILLSBURY
     1 P-K4     P-K4      13 K-R1     Kt-R4
     2 Kt-KB3   Kt-QB3    14 P-Q4     B-Kt3
     3 B-Kt5    Kt-B3     15 Kt-B4    B-Kt5
     4 P-Q3     B-B4      16 Kt-K1    Q-Kt4
     5 P-B3     Q-K2      17 KtxB     RPxKt
     6 Castles  Castles   18 B-Kt3    R-Kt2
     7 B-Kt5    P-KR3     19 B-B4     QR-KKt1
     8 B-KR4(1) P-Q3      20 Q-B1(3)  Kt-B5
     9 QKt-Q2   K-R1      21 Q-K3     B-R6
    10 Q-B2     P-Kt4     22 R-KKt1   BxP ch
    11 BxN      KKtPxB(2) 23 KtxB     P-R6
    12 B-R4     R-KKt1       White resigns
     (1) B-K3 is commended in preference to this, which invites a King side
    attack.
     (2) Pillsbury does not hesitate to break up his Pawns, in view of the open
    file which he gets. But then he was not meeting a master in a tournament game on this occasion.
     (3) This is useless. P-B3 seems playable. Now Black finishes with a few
    powerful moves.
     (4) 24 Q-Kt3, PxKt ch; 25 RxP, Q-B3, etc.
                     _____
       You will notice that the syntax and symbols of descriptive here varies too greatly for early computers to interpret. The solution was algebraic - vastly simplified. Here again is the above for the viewers.

    [Event "Blindfold"]
    [Site "Havana"]
    [Date "1900.03.17"]
    [Round "1"]
    [White "Ramon Iglesias"]
    [Black "Harry Nelson Pillsbury"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "C65"]

    {Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence}
    1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. c3 Qe7 6. O-O O-O 7. Bg5 h6 8. Bh4
    {B-K3 is commended in preference to this, which invites a King side attack.}
    8... d6 9. Nbd2 Kh8 10. Qc2 g5 11. Bxc6 gxh4 {Pillsbury does not hesitate to
    break up his Pawns, in view of the open file which he gets. But then he was not
    meeting a master in a tournament game on this occasion.} 12. Ba4 Rg8
    13. Kh1 Nh5 14. d4 Bb6 15. Nc4 Bg4 16. Ne1 Qg5 17. Nxb6 axb6 18. Bb3 Rg7
    19. Bc4 Rag8 20. Qc1 {This is useless. P-B3 seems playable. Now Black finishes
    with a few powerful moves.} 20... Nf4 21. Qe3 Bh3 22. Rg1 Bxg2+ 23. Nxg2 h3
    24. Qg3 hxg2+ 25. Rxg2 Qf6 0-1

       The third generation language Pascal has made translation to and from
    descriptive feasible, but with a well defined syntax required.

    [Event "Blindfold"]
    [Site "Havana"]
    [Date "1900.03.17"]
    [Round "1"]
    [White "Ramon Iglesias"]
    [Black "Harry Nelson Pillsbury"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "C65"]

    {Ruy Lopez, Berlin Defence}
    1 P-K4, P-K4; 2 N-KB3, N-QB3; 3 B-N5, N-B3; 4 P-Q3, B-B4; 5 P-B3, Q-K2;
    6 Castles, Castles; 7 B-N5, P-KR3; 8 B-KR4, {B-K3 is commended in preference to
    this, which invites a King side attack.} 8 ..., P-Q3; 9 QN-Q2, K-R1;
    10 Q-B2, P-N4; 11 BxN, PxQB; {Pillsbury does not hesitate to break up his
    Pawns, in view of the open file which he gets. But then he was not meeting a
    master in a tournament game on this occasion.} 12 B-R4, R-KN1; 13 K-R1, N-R4;
    14 P-Q4, B-N3; 15 N-B4, B-N5; 16 N-K1, Q-N4; 17 NxB, RPxN; 18 B-N3, R-N2;
    19 B-B4, QR-KN1; 20 Q-B1, {This is useless. P-B3 seems playable. Now Black
    finishes with a few powerful moves.} 20 ..., N-B5; 21 Q-K3, B-R6;
    22 R-KN1, BxP ch; 23 NxB, P-R6; 24 Q-N3, PxN ch; 25 RxP, Q-B3; 0-1

       These two games of Ramon Iglesias are evidence of the great diversity of talents found throughout humanity (see MAT 25:14-46 KJV for the origin of the current interpreation of the word "talent"). In Chess, proportions of points won between any two players is possible, and ratings based on these measure playing strength. "On the chessboard lies and hypocrisy do not survive long. The creative combination lays bare the presumption of lies; the merciless fact, culmination in checkmate, contradicts the hypocrites." Emanuel Lasker.


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