Standard Chess Clocks

  • #1

    Any ideas on how to get one standard type of chess clock for use in over the board chess tournaments. Reason for this is there issues with so many on the market. While the tournament directors and the owners do not know how to set them correctly.

  • #2

    Why not start a trend and get yourself an analog? They are easy to set and supply a calming ticking noise to boot. 

  • #3

    I recently went out to buy a new clock, but was so appalled by the digital models (man, they even make a crappy sound when hit), that I wound up buying another old-style analog clock.

  • #4

    Yes they are lacking in workmanship. I was trying to get a idea on how to get only one standard model of each kind for the tournaments. One digital and one analog. Due to the tournament directors and owners of the clocks not knowing how to set them for the time controls used in each tournament. I was thinking like a (crono's for the only digital accepted, and then doesnt matter for the analog.)

  • #5

    WInd up clocks don't have special tournament modes like increment or delay. As such, I prefer my digital Chronos, but I do admit setting it is much like trying to solve a complex riddle.

  • #6

    why can't you get a digital clock and read the directions on how to set it?

  • #7
    Warbler wrote:

    why can't you get a digital clock and read the directions on how to set it?


    Ever try to set a chronos for any given mode? Even with the instructions, it can be quite confusing. This is because it only has 3 buttons, so you have to use complex combinations of button pushes, holds, and simultanius presses to obtain the right time settings.

  • #8

    Trouble is most here do not play over the board tournaments. So the understanding of the issue is not important here.

  • #9
    FirebrandX wrote:
    Warbler wrote:

    why can't you get a digital clock and read the directions on how to set it?


    Ever try to set a chronos for any given mode? Even with the instructions, it can be quite confusing. This is because it only has 3 buttons, so you have to use complex combinations of button pushes, holds, and simultanius presses to obtain the right time settings.


    I don't own a chronos clock, so I can't say.  If the chronos clork is so confusing, I would recommend getting another brand.   Surely some digital clocks are easier to set once you've read the directions. 

  • #10
    Ferric wrote:

    Trouble is most here do not play over the board tournaments. So the understanding of the issue is not important here.


    just because one does not play otb tournaments, does not mean one can not understand the issue if it is properly explained to them.

  • #11
    Warbler wrote:
    FirebrandX wrote:
    Warbler wrote:

    why can't you get a digital clock and read the directions on how to set it?


    Ever try to set a chronos for any given mode? Even with the instructions, it can be quite confusing. This is because it only has 3 buttons, so you have to use complex combinations of button pushes, holds, and simultanius presses to obtain the right time settings.


    I don't own a chronos clock, so I can't say.  If the chronos clork is so confusing, I would recommend getting another brand.   Surely some digital clocks are easier to set once you've read the directions. 


    Some maybe, but the payoff on the chronos is aesthetics. It is the 'coolest' looking of all the digital clocks on the market, at least in my view. I've accepted the tradeoff, but I was just pointing out that it's not always a simple case of 'rtfm'.

  • #12

    I have a Excalibur, and it's always been easy to set. And although I am a tech-savvy teenager, I've never been great with the various Chronos models.

  • #13
    FirebrandX wrote:Some maybe, but the payoff on the chronos is aesthetics. It is the 'coolest' looking of all the digital clocks on the market, at least in my view. I've accepted the tradeoff, but I was just pointing out that it's not always a simple case of 'rtfm'.

    I just looked at chronos and other digital chess clocks on wholesalechess.com.   I am not so chronos clocks look so much better than other digital clocks.   I multiple nice looking clocks of other brands.

  • #14

    The idea is to get USCF, to use one standard digital clock. Crono's would be my choice.  Runs $100.00 U.S.

  • #15
    Warbler wrote:
    FirebrandX wrote:Some maybe, but the payoff on the chronos is aesthetics. It is the 'coolest' looking of all the digital clocks on the market, at least in my view. I've accepted the tradeoff, but I was just pointing out that it's not always a simple case of 'rtfm'.

    I just looked at chronos and other digital chess clocks on wholesalechess.com.   I am not so chronos clocks look so much better than other digital clocks.   I multiple nice looking clocks of other brands.


    When you see and use them in action compared to the other clocks, they just come off as a high quality product. I was sold the first tournament I saw them in, and I've seen and used probably half a dozen digital clocks on the market. Don't judge them by the picture alone.

  • #16
    FirebrandX wrote:
    Warbler wrote:
    FirebrandX wrote:Some maybe, but the payoff on the chronos is aesthetics. It is the 'coolest' looking of all the digital clocks on the market, at least in my view. I've accepted the tradeoff, but I was just pointing out that it's not always a simple case of 'rtfm'.

    I just looked at chronos and other digital chess clocks on wholesalechess.com.   I am not so chronos clocks look so much better than other digital clocks.   I multiple nice looking clocks of other brands.


    When you see and use them in action compared to the other clocks, they just come off as a high quality product. I was sold the first tournament I saw them in, and I've seen and used probably half a dozen digital clocks on the market. Don't judge them by the picture alone.


    high quality product? if it was really a high quality product, it wouldn't be as difficult to use as you say it is.    And the only reason I was judging on the picture, was that you were says "the payoff on the chronos is aesthetics".  

  • #17

    Aesthetics including the robust feel and handling. You don't have to take my word for it, just read all the 5-star reviews on that wholesale chess site you linked. The Chronos is quite a bit more expensive than the other clocks (except for the DGT ones), and people on there all feel they got their money's worth (including me).

  • #18

    Chronos clocks make everything else seem like a flimsy cheezy toy. Yes, they are unintuitive when it comes to the setting the timing. You need to read the instructions and follow them. But they are an absolutely superior product.  They are more expensive than the competition, in many cases by a factor of two, yet they absolutely dominate the market -- there's a reason. If you've ever said to yourself, "I'd happily pay a premium but just give me real quality -- give me a product that doesn't let me down," -- that's a chronos chess clock. If they made cars I'd want one. 

  • #19

    I've been loving my Chronos for 15 years and have had no issues getting the time controls I need for the moment, assisted by the little cheat sheet taped to the bottom of the case.

    Much of the consternation over setting the thing is solved by programming beforehand the pre-sets to whatever your tournament is using.

    Since the Chronos is a mainstay on the US tournament scene, TDs ought to be familiar enough with it to set it as needed. Ought to be, anyway.

  • #20

    Here's a pic of mine in action, where I scored a one-second victory over an expert in time trouble (I was dead meat on the board, but he lost track of time while trying to net me into a checkmate). We were playing in a tournament that used G/30 with a 5-second delay.

     

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