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for life can’t figure out tiebreak points

  • #1
    Playing a tournament and confident I’ll win last game against guy rated above me. He beat me once and we both beat the other player twice. He has 3 points and 2 tiebreak points where I have 2 Points and 0 tiebreak points.

    If I do beat him will our point and tie break points be the same? Or will one of us have more?
  • #2
    Here is link to the tournament; https://www.chess.com/tournament/intergalactic-space-crusaders2
  • #3

    Tiebreaks are based on the scores of all your opponents.

     

    https://support.chess.com/customer/en/portal/articles/1444840-what-happens-when-there-is-a-tied-score-and-what-is-the-tie-break-

     

    So, if you win your last game against him, you both will have 3 points and 3 tiebreak points.

  • #4

    don't be bother with tie break, just beat all of your opponents.

  • #5

    Tie break points change constantly,because they compare you to everyone else in the tournament. Tie break only comes into play at the end of the tournament after all the games are played. If you are tied with someone at the end of a round both players advance.

  • #6

    Tie-breaks are like women and good luck figuring out either

  • #7

    Here's the Perfect Answer for this solution, Chess. com makes quick calculations of blunders,mistakes and inaccuracies you made in the games you played in tournaments on the basis of which tie points are given. You may have noticed sometimes the player you have beaten in the tournament may have better tie points, this basiclly depend on the quality of moves and mistakes he made in the past games of tournaments. Thankyou! Dont forget to send a friend request for more small and Satisfactory solutions

  • #8
    iamgurmeetsingh wrote:

    Here's the Perfect Answer for this solution, Chess. com makes quick calculations of blunders,mistakes and inaccuracies you made in the games you played in tournaments on the basis of which tie points are given. You may have noticed sometimes the player you have beaten in the tournament may have better tie points, this basiclly depend on the quality of moves and mistakes he made in the past games of tournaments. Thankyou! Dont forget to send a friend request for more small and Satisfactory solutions

    Not true. Nonsense, in fact.

    There is no tie-break system in the world (Median, modified Median, Bucholz, Solkoff, Baumbach, Sonneborn-Berger... NONE of them) that uses the quality of the moves as a factor in its calculation.

    There are several different methods, and you would have to ask the TD (Tournament Director) which one was in use. Some examples, though:

    Median (aka Harkness) system: Sum the final scores of all of your opponents, but drop the highest and lowest scores. 

    Modified Median system: Players with a 50% score are treated as per Median. Players scoring more than 50% have only the lowest opponent's score dropped. Players scoring less than 50% have only the highest opposing score dropped.

    Solkoff: Same as Median but with no scores dropped.

    Baumbach: Most wins (so for tiebreak purposes, a win and a loss count higher than two draws).

    Sonneborn-Berger: Sum the full scores of the opponents you beat, plus half the scores of the opponents you drew with... nothing for opponents you lost to.

    Several other systems exist, as well.

  • #9

    In this particular case... your tie-break is zero, the other guy's is two... it sounds like the Sonneborn-Berger system.

    You get the full points of the players you've defeated (that's zero, cause he's lost all his games) plus half the points of the players you've drawn (again, zero) plus nothing for the players you lost to. Total = zero points.

    Your rival gets the full points of the players he defeated (that's two, for your two victories plus zero for the guy that won no games), half the points of any drawn opponents (zero cause no draws), plus zero for people he lost to. Total = two points.

  • #10
    blueemu wrote:

    In this particular case... your tie-break is zero, the other guy's is two... it sounds like the Sonneborn-Berger system.

    ....

     

    That is the system used here.

  • #11

    Post 8: thank you for that...didn't know that there were 5 of them(in total)...

    Learned something new...

  • #12

    chess.com use sonneborn berger system in tie break.

  • #13
    iamgurmeetsingh escribió:

    Here's the Perfect Answer for this solution, Chess. com makes quick calculations of blunders,mistakes and inaccuracies you made in the games you played in tournaments on the basis of which tie points are given. You may have noticed sometimes the player you have beaten in the tournament may have better tie points, this basiclly depend on the quality of moves and mistakes he made in the past games of tournaments. Thankyou! Dont forget to send a friend request for more small and Satisfactory solutions

    null

     

  • #14
    Piperose wrote:

    Post 8: thank you for that...didn't know that there were 5 of them(in total)...

    Learned something new...

    There are at least three more, less common systems. I only listed the major ones.

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