USCF OTB: Ok to stand behind Opponent's Chair? + Puzzle Question

SeniorPatzer

I asked Martin Stahl about this, and he's a tournament director, and he said: 

 

"Players are allowed to move around and can look at the position from any angle. As long as they are not intruding on the other player's space, then there is nothing wrong."

HolographWars

I usually do that for black, to see white's perspective, and do that about 2 times per game.

SeniorPatzer
HolographWars wrote:

I usually do that for black, to see white's perspective, and do that about 2 times per game.

 

I asked this before, but maybe it got skipped because it was the last comment on the previous page:

 

Curious, HolographWars.  Do you ever feel funny or self-conscious when you walk over to your opponent's side of the table?  I've never done it before, but I'm thinking I'd feel a little weird, and hoping that the other players in the playing hall don't think I'm weird.

HolographWars

I like to do it because I am usually more at home with white. I don't feel funny. Chess diagrams in books always feature white side first. I want to know how my position looks from the "normal" point of view, thought I have never thought my position "drastically changes" when I move from one side to another. 

HolographWars

And it helps me think, "What would I do if I were white, and how can I prepare myself?"

Firethorn15

This concept of seeing things from your opponent's point of view (especially from White's point of view as Black, for the aforementioned reason (diagrams in books)) is interesting. I had an OTB game once as White where my opponent, a 2000-rated player, fell for the following trap:

This is an extremely famous trap (Fischer - Reshevsky, New York 1958-59), and my opponent had seen it before, but it is always shown from the White side and thus a player unfamiliar with the opening (my opponent plays many different opening lines as either colour) would not necessarily spot it in an OTB game.

AnthonyAtanasov
Firethorn15 wrote:

This concept of seeing things from your opponent's point of view (especially from White's point of view as Black, for the aforementioned reason (diagrams in books)) is interesting. I had an OTB game once as White where my opponent, a 2000-rated player, fell for the following trap:

This is an extremely famous trap (Fischer - Reshevsky, New York 1958-59), and my opponent had seen before, but it is always shown from the White side and thus a player unfamiliar with the opening (my opponent plays many different opening lines as either colour) would not necessarily see it.

that is one of my favorite opening traps btw grin.png