Play Against Bobby Fischer

  • IM Igor Khmelnitsky
  • Avg Rating: 1652
  • Strategy

<p> To have successful results in chess you must do well in critical positions. </p> <p> The first task is to recognize a critical position - for example one in which your opponent has created a threat or the one when you have an opportunity to create or execute a threat. </p> <p> The second task is to assess such situation properly and come up with quality move-candidates. </p> <p> Finally, using calculation as well as your knowledge base, to come up with the best move. </p> <p> Experienced players go through this process naturally. For improving player, I recommend to break it down in the steps mentioned above. When you start doing it methodically like this, you will be able to make better decisions and get better results no matter who you are playing against. Even the world champion can be drawn or even beaten if you maintain your focus and your composure. </p> <p> Don't believe me? Well, here I collected 25 examples from the games of chess legend, 11th World Champion Robert Fischer. In each of these examples, you will 'partner' with Fischer's opponent and be given an opportunity to examine Fischer's last move, identify Fischer's objectives, come up with your move-candidates and execute the best move (and often a series of moves). This is your chance to 'virtually' compete against one of the best chess players ever. He will put serious pressure on you - create threats and be evasive, attack you and fiercely defend. The positions will range from Middlegame to Endgame, Tactics to Strategy, Easy to Complex... </p> <p> If you take your time and maintain your focus, you can do well in this task. And if you can do well against Fischer, then you can play well against anyone. Just keep working on improving your skills and increasing your knowledge base. </p> <p> Good luck! </p>

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Start
  • Lesson 1

    You are playing black and your 'partner' is Ross Carbonell (simul in Houston). It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 24.Bxc7, grabbing the black pawn. What are black's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 2

    You are playing black and your 'partner' is Ludeck Pachman. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer just played 55. Rd3-c3. Why do you think he played this move? Does white have any good opportunities? What should he do?
  • Lesson 3

    You are playing white and your 'partner' is Robert Sobel. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer just played 22...e7-e6. Why do you think he played this move? Does white have any good opportunities? What should he do?
  • Lesson 4

    This is the endgame of 'your' game (as M. Matulovich) against Fischer (Black). It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer just played 39...Kh4-g3. Why do you think he played this move? Does white have any good opportunities? What should he do?
  • Lesson 5

    You are playing white and your 'partner' is Ludek Pachman. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer just played 23...f4-f3. Why do you think he played this move? How should white deal with all of the black's threats?
  • Lesson 6

    You are playing white and your 'partner' is Pal Benko. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer just played 37...Bg7-h6. Why do you think he played this move? Does white have any good opportunities? What should he do?
  • Lesson 7

    You are playing black and your 'partner' is Rene Letelier. It is your move. How do you evaluate this pawn endgame? Fischer just played 50. f4-f5. Why do you think he played this move? Does black have any good opportunities? What should he do?
  • Lesson 8

    You are playing white and your 'partner' is Raul Sanguineti. It is your move. How do you evaluate this Rook endgame? Fischer just played 35. ..Ke7x(B)d7. Does white have any good opportunities? What should he do?
  • Lesson 9

    You are playing black and your 'partner' is Cezar Munoz. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer just played 22.e4-e5. Why do you think he played this move? What are black's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 10

    You are playing white and your 'partner' is Wolfgang Unzicker. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's Knight was under attack on g4 and he addressed the threat by playing 17...Ng4xe5. What are white's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 11

    You are playing white and your 'partner' is Max Blau. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 19...Rd8x(N)d5. What is he planning next? What are white's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 12

    You are playing white and your 'partner' is Fridrik Olafsson. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 36...Kg8-h7. Why did he play that move? What are white's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 13

    You are playing black and your 'partner' is Roger Underhill (Fischer tour simul). It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 28.Re1-e5. What was his idea? Did he present you with any opportunities? What are Black's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 14

    You are playing black and your 'partner' is Vassily Smyslov. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 32. Rh3-g3. What is he planning? What are black's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 15

    You are playing white and your 'partner' is Paul Keres. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 29...Nf6x(Q)g4. What is he planning? What are white's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 16

    You are playing white and your 'partner' is Laszlo Szabo. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 19...Qb6-a5. What is he planning? What are white's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 17

    You are playing black and your 'partner' is Dieter Keller. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 42. Ng5-e6. What are his threats?? What are black's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 18

    You are playing white and your 'partner' is Efim Geller. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 53...Bb7x(B)f3. What are white's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 19

    You are playing black and your 'partner' is Heinz Matthai. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 25. f4-f5. What is he planning? What are black's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 20

    You are playing white and your 'partner' is Samuel Reshevsky. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 27...Nc6-e5. What is he planning? What are white's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 21

    You are playing white and your 'partner' is Gedeon Barcza. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 72...Rh7-f7. What is he planning? What are white's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 22

    You are playing black and your 'partner' is Ruben Schocron. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 38. Ra6-c6. What is he planning? What are white's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 23

    You are playing black and your 'partner' is Victor Korchnoi. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 31.g2-g4. Why did he play that move? What is he planning? What are black's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 24

    You are playing black and your 'partner' is Efim Geller. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 66. Re1xe4, winning one of black's extra pawns What are black's options and how should he respond?
  • Lesson 25

    You are playing black and your 'partner' is Robert Byrne. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Fischer's last move was 12. Nd4xc6. What is he planning? What are black's options and how should he respond?

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