x
Chess - Play & Learn

Chess.com

FREE - In Google Play

FREE - in Win Phone Store

VIEW

Play Against Capablanca

IM Igor Khmelnitsky Avg Rating: 1622 Games

Dear chess friend, <br /><br /> In this course we will continue discussion about the critical positions. Just to refresh your memory, I'd like to re-emphasize the following critical steps of your decision making that are necessary to succeed in chess: <br /><br /> 1. Recognizing the critical position (i.e. your opponent has created a threat or the one when you have an opportunity to create or execute a threat). 2. Spend time and assess such situation properly and come up with quality move-candidates. 3. Come up with the best move applying your general knowledge combined with an accurate calculation. <br /><br /> Experienced players go through this process naturally. For improving player, I recommend to break it down in the steps mentioned above. When you start doing it methodically like this, you will be able to make better decisions and get etter results, no matter who you are playing against. Even the world champion can be drawn or even beaten if you maintain your focus and your composure. <br /><br /> In the past, I already showed you examples from Fischer's games as well as from Lasker's games. Here I have collected 25 examples from the games of another chess legend - 3rd World Champion Jose Raul Capablanca. While he was the World champion for only 6 years, Capablanca has been always considered as an extremely remarkable player. Capablanca lost only 35 serious games (as an adult), and went undefeated in 63 games during 8 year stretch which included some strong tournaments as well as his title match for the World Championship against Emanuel Lasker in 1921. Even Alekhine, who wrestled the World Championship from Capablanca had utmost respect for the latter: "How did it happen that he lost to me? I must confess that even now I cannot answer that question with certainty, since in 1927 I did not believe that I was superior to him." <br /><br /> Capablanca had great feel for the game, excellent judgement of position and loved playing simple positions and endgames. He could play tactically when necessary. <br /><br /> In each of the 25 examples, you will 'partner' with Capablanca's opponent and be given an opportunity to examine Capablanca's last move, identify Capablanca's objectives, come up with your move-candidates and execute the best move (and often a series of moves). This is your chance to 'virtually' compete against one of the best chess players ever. He will put serious pressure on you - create threats and be evasive, attack you and fiercely defend. The positions will range from Middlegame to Endgame, Tactics to Strategy, Easy to Complex.... <br /><br /> If you take your time and maintain your focus, you can do well in this task. And if you can do well against Capablanca, then you can play well against anyone. Just keep working on improving your calculational skills and increasing your knowledge base. <br /><br /> Good luck! <br /><br /> -IM Igor Khmelnitsky

Percent Complete: 0%
Start
  • Saemisch - Capablanca, Karlsbad 1929

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Saemisch. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 9...Bc8-a6, planning to build a pressure against the doubled c-pawn. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Capablanca - Hoffman, 1922

    You are playing Black and your 'partner' is Hoffman. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was at typical sacrifice on h7 - 9. Be4xh7+. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Alekhine - Capablanca, 1927

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Alekhine. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 47...Rc2-c4, attacking one of White's pawns. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Capablanca - Bain, 1933

    You are playing Black and your 'partner' is Mary Bain. This is a blindfold exhibition. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 9. Ne2x(B)d4. What are Black's options and how should he respond?
  • Euwe - Capablanca, 1938

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Euwe. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 25...c7-c6, strengthening the Q-side pawns. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Capablanca - Alekhine, 1927

    You are playing Black and your 'partner' is Alekhine. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 30. d4-d5, attacking in the center. What are Black's options and how should he respond?
  • Alekhine - Capablanca, 1927

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Alekhine. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 35...Be7x(N)c5, eliminating the dangerous Knight. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Eliskases - Capablanca, 1937

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Elsikases. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 369...Bc8x(N)e6, leaving the a6 pawn en prise. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Capablanca - Thomas, 1919

    You are playing Black and your 'partner' is Thomas. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 29. Qa6-a8, with (seemingly) deadly threats on the 8th rank. Black resigned here. Any other options you can see here?
  • Winter - Capablanca, 1936

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is William. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 36...Kg6-h5, trying to run away from White pieces. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Capablanca - Adams, 1915

    You are playing Black and your 'partner' is Fonaroff. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 28. Bd2-e3, hoping to plug the holes around his King. What are Black's options and how should he respond?
  • Marshall - Capablanca, 1909

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Marshall. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 24...Rb8-b6, shielding the a7 pawn from the Queen's attack and attempting to defend the Bishop. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Capablanca - Molina, 1914

    You are playing Black and your 'partner' is Molina. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 24. d3-d4, hoping to push back Black's rook and open some space for his pieces. What are Black's options and how should he respond?
  • Janowski - Capablanca, 1913

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Janowski. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 24...g5x(P)h4. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Capablanca - Dake, 1931

    You are playing Black and your 'partner' is Dake. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 50. Pg3-g4, seemingly achieving nothing. What are Black's options and how should he respond?
  • Nimzowitsch - Capablanca, 1927

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Nimtozowitsch. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 17...Ph7-h5, undermining your K-side pawns. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Lilienthal - Capablanca, 1935

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Lilienthal. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 19...Qc4x(P)e4, strengthening the queenside pawns. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Capablanca - Fonaroff, 1918

    You are playing Black and your 'partner' is Fonaroff. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 18. Bf4x(N)e5, creating very serious threats. What are Black's options and how should he respond?
  • Alekhine - Capablanca, 1927

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Alekhine. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 14...Bc8-f5, attacking your Queen. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Alekhine - Capablanca, 1927

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Alekhine. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 39...Pc5-c4, attacking the Bishop and trying to disrupt coordination of White pieces. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Capablanca - Alekhine, 1927

    You are playing Black and your 'partner' is Alekhine. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 30. Rf1-b1, creating a threat of capturing the B. What are Black's options and how should he respond?
  • Tarrasch - Capablanca, 1914

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Tarrasch. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 17...Bg4x(N)f3. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Bernstein - Capablanca, 1914

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Bernstein. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 26..Rc7-c5, attacking the N. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Capablanca - Marshall, 1914

    You are playing Black and your 'partner' is Marshall. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 18. Re7x(B)e6, starting the fireworks. What are Black's options and how should he respond?
  • Botvinnik - Capablanca, 1938

    You are playing White and your 'partner' is Botvinnik. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 29...Qe8-e7, blocking the danerous P and gibing extra support to the Nf6. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Capablanca - Alekhine, 1927

    You are playing Black and your 'partner' is Alekhine. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was at typical sacrifice on h7 - 19. Rf1-d1, strngthening his control over the d-file. What are White's options and how should he respond?
  • Capablanca - Janowski, 1916

    You are playing Black and your 'partner' is Janowski. It is your move. How do you evaluate the situation? Capablanca's last move was 83. Kc4-d5, improving his King, while preventing the Black King from getting back to the b-pawn. Black resigned here. Any other options you can see here?

Online Now