x
Chess - Play & Learn

Chess.com

FREE - In Google Play

FREE - in Win Phone Store

VIEW

Rook and Other Endgames

IM Jeremy Silman Avg Rating: 1321 Endgames

"Rook and Other Endgames" covers rook endings with some minor piece and queen endings included.

Percent Complete: 0%
Start
  • Rook versus pawn

    This type of endgame usually occurs when one side has to surrender his Rook for a dangerous enemy pawn. In Rook versus one pawn situations, the side with the Rook will always win if his King can get in front of the pawn (see Variation One). In this case, though, the White King is behind the enemy pawn. However, the win is still easy because the pawn and its King are not too far advanced. <br /> To see what happens if Black has the first move, see Variation Two.
  • Rook versus pawn

    This type of endgame usually occurs when one side has to surrender his Rook for a dangerous enemy pawn. In Rook versus one pawn situations, the side with the Rook will always win if his King can get in front of the pawn. White just gangs up on the poor pawn and wins it. For an example of the White King sitting behind the pawn, see the Variation.
  • King and Rook versus pawn

    This type of endgame usually occurs when one side has to surrender his Rook for a dangerous enemy pawn. In Rook versus one pawn situations, the side with the Rook will always win if his King can get in front of the pawn (see Variation One). In this case, though, the White King is behind the enemy pawn. However, the win is still easy because the pawn and its King are not too far advanced. <br /> I should note that the win is even easier if the Black King is one rank back (on e6). To see just...
  • Rook versus pawn

    This type of endgame usually occurs when one side has to surrender his Rook for a dangerous enemy pawn. In Rook versus one pawn situations, the side with the Rook will always win if his King can get in front of the pawn. White just gangs up on the poor pawn and wins it. For an example of the White King sitting behind the pawn, see the Variation.
  • King and Rook versus pawn

    This type of endgame usually occurs when one side has to surrender his Rook for a dangerous enemy pawn. In Rook versus one pawn situations, the side with the Rook will always win if his King can get in front of the pawn (see Variation One). In this case, though, the White King is behind the enemy pawn. However, the win is still easy because the pawn and its King are not too far advanced. I should note that the win is even easier if the Black King is one rank back (on e6). To see just how easy, take...
  • Rook versus pawn

    This type of endgame usually occurs when one side has to surrender his Rook for a dangerous enemy pawn. In Rook versus one pawn situations, the side with the Rook will always win if his King can get in front of the pawn. White just gangs up on the poor pawn and wins it. For an example of the White King sitting behind the pawn, see the Variation.
  • Rook versus pawn

    This type of endgame usually occurs when one side has to surrender his Rook for a dangerous enemy pawn. In Rook versus one pawn situations, the side with the Rook will always win if his King can get in front of the pawn. In this case, though, the White King is behind the enemy pawn. However, the win is still easy because the pawn and its King are not too far advanced.
  • King and Rook vs. King and pawn

    Black's pieces stand on the fifth rank (the Variation shows how the game can be drawn if even one of the defending pieces reaches this rank) which usually will give him good drawing chances if the White King is far away. However, two factors give White some chances to win: 1) The White King is just four moves away from f2; 2) The White Rook is already covering the pawn's Queening square. Though some things are against him, Black can still draw by making use of an important rule in King and Rook...
  • King and Rook vs. King and pawn

    If the Black pawn and/or its King reach the fifth rank and if the White King is stuck behind the pawn on the eighth rank the game can usually be drawn. In the present case the Black pieces are only on the fourth but Black has the move (White to move would win for White. For the basic winning method, see Variation One) and can get his pawn to the fifth. Since White's King is far from the action, Black should be able to hold the game.
  • King and Rook versus pawn

    This type of endgame usually occurs when one side has to surrender his Rook for a dangerous enemy pawn. In Rook versus one pawn situations, the side with the Rook will always win if his King can get in front of the pawn (see Variation One). In this case, though, the White King is behind the enemy pawn. However, the win is still easy because the pawn and its King are not too far advanced. I should note that the win is even easier if the Black King is one rank back (on e6). To see just how easy, take...
  • King and Rook vs. King and pawn

    Black's pieces stand on the fifth rank (the Variation shows how the game can be drawn if even one of the defending pieces reaches this rank) which usually will give him good drawing chances if the White King is far away. However, two factors give White some chances to win: 1) The White King is just four moves away from f2; 2) The White Rook is already covering the pawn's Queening square. Though some things are against him, Black can still draw by making use of an important rule in King and Rook...
  • King and Rook vs. King and pawn

    If the Black pawn and/or its King reach the fifth rank and if the White King is stuck behind the pawn on the eighth rank the game can usually be drawn. In the present case the Black pieces are only on the fourth but Black has the move (White to move would win for White. For the basic winning method, see Variation One) and can get his pawn to the fifth. Since White's King is far from the action, Black should be able to hold the game.
  • King and Rook vs. King and two connected pawns

    If the Kings are too far away to play role, a lone Rook can always stop two connected passed pawns unless they both reach the sixth rank or one reaches the seventh and the other is on the fifth. In the present position Black's pawns are only on the sixth and fifth, thus White should win. See the Variation for the same position with Black to move.
  • King and Rook vs. King and two connected pawns

    White to move would win the game (as seen in the Variation) by stopping both pawns from reaching the sixth rank, since two connected pawns on the sixth rank (with no Kings playing a part) win for the pawns. In the present case Black wins because he can force the promotion of one of his pawns.
  • King and Rook vs. King and two connected pawns

    White to move would win the game (as seen in the Variation) by stopping both pawns from reaching the sixth rank, since two connected pawns on the sixth rank (with no Kings playing a part) win for the pawns. In the present case Black wins because he can force the promotion of one of his pawns.
  • King and Rook vs. King and two connected pawns

    If the Kings are too far away to play role, a lone Rook can always stop two connected passed pawns unless they both reach the sixth rank or one reaches the seventh and the other is on the fifth. In the present position Black's pawns are only on the sixth and fifth, thus White should win. See the Variation for the same position with Black to move.
  • Rook and two pawns vs. Rook and pawn

    This is a tricky position because it can only be solved if you make use of several bits of knowledge. You must know that a Rook can stop two connected pawns if they are not both on the sixth rank (as seen in Variation One). You must also be aware that a King and pawn on the fifth rank can often draw against a Rook if the stronger sides King is far from the action (see Variation Two). Finally you will have to notice that blocking ideas and promotions with check can also materialize if you are not...
  • King and Rook vs. King and two connected pawns

    If the Kings are too far away to play role, a lone Rook can always stop two connected passed pawns unless they both reach the sixth rank or one reaches the seventh and the other is on the fifth. In the present position Black's pawns are only on the sixth and fifth, thus White should win. See the Variation for the same position with Black to move.
  • King and Rook vs. King and pawn

    If the Black pawn and/or its King reach the fifth rank and if the White King is stuck behind the pawn on the eighth rank the game can usually be drawn. In the present case the Black pieces are only on the fourth but Black has the move (White to move would win for White. For the basic winning method, see Variation One) and can get his pawn to the fifth. Since White's King is far from the action, Black should be able to hold the game.
  • King and Rook vs. King and two connected pawns

    White to move would win the game (as seen in the Variation) by stopping both pawns from reaching the sixth rank, since two connected pawns on the sixth rank (with no Kings playing a part) win for the pawns. In the present case Black wins because he can force the promotion of one of his pawns.
  • King and Rook vs. King and two disconnected pawns

    A Rook can stop two disconnected pawns even if they both reach the seventh rank. Then the result depends on which King is closer to the action. In the present example, the White King is much closer to the pawns so White ends up with the victory.
  • Rook and pawn on the fifth vs. Rook

    In general, a pawn (as long as it's not a Rook-pawn) on the fifth wins if the enemy King is cut off from the action by one file (confirming the rule that you should always trap the enemy King as far away from the action as possible) and the King is stuck on the long side of the board (see Variation Two for an exception). If those conditions are met, the White King is able to advance down the board and eventually force a Lucena position (see Variation One if you have forgotten what a Lucena position...
  • Lucena Position

    This is the single most important position in Rook endgames. The stronger side should always be striving to achieve this position and the defender must avoid it at all costs. First mentioned in a book by Salvio published in 1634 (!), the original analysis of this endgame has been attributed to Scipione Genovino at an earlier date. It is interesting to note that Lucena didn't mention this position in his book (published in 1497). Instead, he looked at some openings and also compared chess with feminism....
  • Rook and pawn on the fifth vs. Rook

    In general, a pawn (as long as it's not a Rook-pawn) on the fifth wins if the enemy King is cut off from the action by one file (confirming the rule that you should always trap the enemy King as far away from the action as possible) and the King is stuck on the long the side board (as shown in Variation Three). If those conditions are met, the White King is able to advance down the board and eventually force a Lucena position (see Variation One if you have forgotten what a Lucena position is). This...
  • Rook and pawn on the fifth vs. Rook

    In general, a pawn (as long as it's not a Rook-pawn) on the fifth wins if the enemy King is cut off from the action by one file (confirming the rule that you should always trap the enemy King as far away from the action as possible) and the King is stuck on the long the side board (as shown in Variation Three). If those conditions are met, the White King is able to advance down the board and eventually force a Lucena position (see Variation One if you have forgotten what a Lucena position is). This...
  • King and pawn versus King

    King and pawn versus a lone King is an extremely common endgame which must be understood completely. In general, if the defender's King can get in front of the pawn the game will be drawn with ease. The rule is as follows: jump in front of the pawn whenever possible. When you have to move out of its way, always go straight back with your King. The reason for this is that when the White King comes forward you can step in front of him and take the opposition. Repeat these steps until a stalemate results....
  • Rook and pawn on the fifth vs. Rook

    In general, a pawn (as long as it's not a Rook-pawn) on the fifth wins if the enemy King is cut off from the action by one file (confirming the rule that you should always trap the enemy King as far away from the action as possible) and the King is stuck on the long side of the board. If those conditions are met, the White King is able to advance down the board and eventually force a Lucena position.
  • Rook and Knight-pawn on the sixth vs. passive Rook

    In general a pawn on the sixth combined with a passive Black Rook would be enough for White to win (see Variation One and Variation Two). However, in this case the presence of a Knight-pawn enables Black to hold the game because the White Rook doesn't have enough room to swing over to the left.
  • King and Pawn versus King

    When one side has a pawn left and the other side has nothing, the result of the game depends on the placement of the Kings. If the defending King can get in front of the pawn he will usually draw. If the attacker's King gets in front of his own pawn the result hinges on who has the opposition. If you need to review basic opposition, see Variation One.
  • Rook and Bishop-pawn on fifth vs. Rook

    This kind of position will win for White if his pawn is on the fifth rank and if the Black King is trapped a file away on the long side (for an explanation of short and long sides of the board, see Variation One). Unfortunately (from White's perspective), in the present problem the Black King is on the short side and that fact allows the Black Rook to get sufficient checking distance to draw.
  • Philidor Position gone bad

    In a normal Philidor Position the Black Rook would go to g6 and stop the White King from ever advancing (see Variation One for an example of a pure Philidor). However, in this position the location of White's Rook makes this plan impossible. Though things may look bad for the second player, he can still draw by using his Rook in a very active but accurate manner. Editor's note: Jeremy presents a drawing method from a famous study by Kling and Horwitz (1851). There are several other ways to draw...
  • Rook and Bishop-pawn on fifth vs. Rook

    White wins easily because his pawn is on the fifth and the Black King is trapped on the long side of the board, one file away from the action (the game would be drawn if the King stood on a6-the short side. See Variation One for an example of that situation). This hurts Black because he can no longer get endless checks by putting his Rook on the h-file since his own King would get in the way.
  • Philidor Position

    This type of situation (with the defending King in front of the enemy pawn) is known as a Philidor Position and is the second most important position in Rook endgames (the Lucena being the most important). You simply must know it! In general, if the your King gets in front of the enemy pawn you should draw the game. However, there are ways to go wrong so a knowledge of the correct technique is essential to all serious players.
  • Rook and Bishop-pawn on fifth vs. Rook

    White wins easily because his pawn is on the fifth and the Black King is trapped on the long side of the board, one file away from the action (the game would be drawn if the King stood on a6-the short side. See Variation One for an example of that situation). This hurts Black because he can no longer get endless checks by putting his Rook on the h-file since his own King would get in the way.
  • Rook and Bishop-pawn on fifth vs. Rook

    This kind of position will win for White if his pawn is on the fifth rank and if the Black King is trapped a file away on the long side (for an explanation of short and long sides of the board, see Variation One). Unfortunately (from White's perspective), in the present problem the Black King is on the short side and that fact allows the Black Rook to get sufficient checking distance to draw.
  • Rook and pawn on the fourth vs. Rook

    Though White wins if his pawn is on the fifth rank and if the King is trapped one file away from the action on the long side of the board, in this case White's pawn is only on the fourth rank. This will be the only problem that deals with pawns below the fifth rank simply because the theory is too complicated for our present purposes. However, suffice it to say that White wins because he has trapped the enemy King two files away from the action on the long side of the board. The winning method consists...
  • Rook and Bishop-pawn on the sixth vs. passive Rook

    If the enemy King is in front of the pawn (in a Rook and pawn versus Rook endgame) the game will be drawn unless the defending Rook is passively placed. In the present problem the difference between Rooks is clear. Black's Rook is stuck on the first rank while White's is a threatening monster of death. In general, NEVER allow your Rook to get this passive! However, if White is left with a Rook-pawn or a Knight-pawn then the game will be drawn (if the defending King gets in front of the pawn) no...
  • Rook and Bishop-pawn on fifth vs. Rook

    White wins easily because his pawn is on the fifth and the Black King is trapped on the long side of the board, one file away from the action (the game would be drawn if the King stood on a6-the short side. See Variation One for an example of that situation). This hurts Black because he can no longer get endless checks by putting his Rook on the h-file since his own King would get in the way.
  • Rook and center pawn on sixth vs. passive Rook

    If the enemy King is in front of the pawn (in a Rook and pawn versus Rook endgame) the game will be drawn unless the defending Rook is passively placed. In the present problem the difference between Rooks is clear. Black's Rook is stuck on the first rank while White's is a threatening monster of death. In general, NEVER allow your Rook to get this passive! However, if White is left with a Rook-pawn or a Knight-pawn then the game will be drawn (if the defending King gets in front of the pawn) no...
  • Rook and Knight-pawn on the sixth vs. passive Rook

    In general a pawn on the sixth combined with a passive Black Rook would be enough for White to win (see Variation One and Variation Two). However, in this case the presence of a Knight-pawn enables Black to hold the game because the White Rook doesn't have enough room to swing over to the left.
  • Rook and Bishop-pawn on the sixth vs. passive Rook

    If the enemy King is in front of the pawn (in a Rook and pawn versus Rook endgame) the game will be drawn unless the defending Rook is passively placed. In the present problem the difference between Rooks is clear. Black's Rook is stuck on the first rank while White's is a threatening monster of death. In general, NEVER allow your Rook to get this passive! However, if White is left with a Rook-pawn or a Knight-pawn then the game will be drawn (if the defending King gets in front of the pawn) no...
  • Rook and Knight-pawn on the sixth vs. passive Rook

    In general a pawn on the sixth combined with a passive Black Rook would be enough for White to win (see Variation One and Variation Two). However, in this case the presence of a Knight-pawn enables Black to hold the game because the White Rook doesn't have enough room to swing over to the left.
  • Rook and Knight-pawn on the sixth vs. passive Rook

    In general a pawn on the sixth combined with a passive Black Rook would be enough for White to win (see Variation One and Variation Two). However, in this case the presence of a Knight-pawn enables Black to hold the game because the White Rook doesn't have enough room to swing over to the left.
  • Rook and center pawn on sixth vs. passive Rook

    If the enemy King is in front of the pawn (in a Rook and pawn versus Rook endgame) the game will be drawn unless the defending Rook is passively placed. In the present problem the difference between Rooks is clear. Black's Rook is stuck on the first rank while White's is a threatening monster of death. In general, NEVER allow your Rook to get this passive! However, if White is left with a Rook-pawn or a Knight-pawn then the game will be drawn (if the defending King gets in front of the pawn) no...
  • Rook and Bishop-pawn on the sixth vs. passive Rook

    If the enemy King is in front of the pawn (in a Rook and pawn versus Rook endgame) the game will be drawn unless the defending Rook is passively placed. In the present problem the difference between Rooks is clear. Black's Rook is stuck on the first rank while White's is a threatening monster of death. In general, NEVER allow your Rook to get this passive! However, if White is left with a Rook-pawn or a Knight-pawn then the game will be drawn (if the defending King gets in front of the pawn) no...
  • Rook and center pawn vs. passive Rook

    If the enemy King is in front of the pawn (in a Rook and pawn versus Rook endgame) the game will be drawn unless the defending Rook is passively placed. In the present problem the difference between Rooks is clear. Black's Rook is stuck on the first rank while White's is a threatening monster of death. In general, NEVER allow your Rook to get this passive! However, if White is left with a Rook-pawn or a Knight-pawn then the game will be drawn (if the defending King gets in front of the pawn) no...
  • Rook and Knight-pawn on the sixth vs. passive Rook

    In general a pawn on the sixth combined with a passive Black Rook would be enough for White to win (see Variation One and Variation Two). However, in this case the presence of a Knight-pawn enables Black to hold the game because the White Rook doesn't have enough room to swing over to the left.
  • Philidor Position

    This type of situation (with the defending King in front of the enemy pawn) is known as a Philidor Position and is the second most important position in Rook endgames (the Lucena being the most important). You simply must know it! In general, if the your King gets in front of the enemy pawn you should draw the game. However, there are ways to go wrong so a knowledge of the correct technique is essential to all serious players.
  • Rook and center pawn on sixth vs. passive Rook

    If the enemy King is in front of the pawn (in a Rook and pawn versus Rook endgame) the game will be drawn unless the defending Rook is passively placed. In the present problem the difference between Rooks is clear. Black's Rook is stuck on the first rank while White's is a threatening monster of death. In general, NEVER allow your Rook to get this passive! However, if White is left with a Rook-pawn or a Knight-pawn then the game will be drawn (if the defending King gets in front of the pawn) no...
  • Philidor Position gone bad

    In a normal Philidor Position the Black Rook would go to g6 and stop the White King from ever advancing (see Variation One for an example of a pure Philidor). However, in this position the location of White's Rook makes this plan impossible. Though things may look bad for the second player, he can still draw by using his Rook in a very active but accurate manner. Editor's note: Jeremy presents a drawing method from a famous study by Kling and Horwitz (1851). There are several other ways to draw...
  • King and pawn versus King

    King and pawn versus a lone King is an extremely common endgame which must be understood completely. In general, if the defender's King can get in front of the pawn the game will be drawn with ease. The rule is as follows: jump in front of the pawn whenever possible. When you have to move out of its way, always go straight back with your King. The reason for this is that when the White King comes forward you can step in front of him and take the opposition. Repeat these steps until a stalemate results....
  • Philidor Position gone bad

    In a normal Philidor Position the Black Rook would go to g6 and stop the White King from ever advancing (see Variation One for an example of a pure Philidor). However, in this position the location of White's Rook makes this plan impossible. Though things may look bad for the second player, he can still draw by using his Rook in a very active but accurate manner. Editor's note: Jeremy presents a drawing method from a famous study by Kling and Horwitz (1851). There are several other ways to draw...
  • Philidor Position

    This type of situation (with the defending King in front of the enemy pawn) is known as a Philidor Position and is the second most important position in Rook endgames (the Lucena being the most important). You simply must know it! In general, if the your King gets in front of the enemy pawn you should draw the game. However, there are ways to go wrong so a knowledge of the correct technique is essential to all serious players.
  • Rook and center pawn on sixth vs. passive Rook

    If the enemy King is in front of the pawn (in a Rook and pawn versus Rook endgame) the game will be drawn unless the defending Rook is passively placed. In the present problem the difference between Rooks is clear. Black's Rook is stuck on the first rank while White's is a threatening monster of death. In general, NEVER allow your Rook to get this passive! However, if White is left with a Rook-pawn or a Knight-pawn then the game will be drawn (if the defending King gets in front of the pawn) no...
  • Place Rooks Behind Passed Pawns!

    One of the monster rules of Rook endgames states that you should always place your Rooks behind passed pawns. It doesn't matter who's passed pawn it is, just place your Rook behind it! In the present position the game will swing on who follows this piece of advice. If Black has the move (which he does) he draws while White to move would win.
  • Place Rooks Behind Passed Pawns!

    One of the monster rules of Rook endgames states that you should always place your Rooks behind passed pawns. It doesn't matter who's passed pawn it is, just place your Rook behind it! In the present position the game will swing on who follows this piece of advice. If Black has the move he draws (as shown in Variation One) while White to move (and it is White to move) would win.
  • Place Rooks Behind Passed Pawns!

    One of the monster rules of Rook endgames states that you should always place your Rooks behind passed pawns. It doesn't matter who's passed pawn it is, just place your Rook behind it! In the present position the game will swing on who follows this piece of advice. If Black has the move he draws (as shown in Variation One) while White to move (and it is White to move) would win.
  • Place Rooks Behind Passed Pawns!

    One of the monster rules of Rook endgames states that you should always place your Rooks behind passed pawns. It doesn't matter who's passed pawn it is, just place your Rook behind it! In the present position the game will swing on who follows this piece of advice. If Black has the move (which he does) he draws while White to move would win.
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Black has correctly placed his Rook behind the passed pawn (Variation One shows how important this concept is) and the Black King is closer to the action. One would think that this means that Black should draw and, under normal circumstances, it would. However, Black has committed a big sin here and allowed a very important trick. This trick must be thoroughly understood since you will eventually be on both sides of it.
  • Place Rooks Behind Passed Pawns!

    One of the monster rules of Rook endgames states that you should always place your Rooks behind passed pawns. It doesn't matter who's passed pawn it is, just place your Rook behind it! In the present position the game will swing on who follows this piece of advice. If Black has the move (which he does) he draws while White to move would win.
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Though White is a pawn up and the pawn is only one square away from promotion, White can't make progress because his Rook is too passive (Black has his Rook behind the passed pawn-always a good thing to do as Variation One shows) and his King is unable to hide from the checks. Black can easily draw this position if he just moves his King from h7 to g7 (avoiding a skewer as seen in Variation Two) and checks the White King whenever it touches the pawn (which threatens to free the Rook of guard duty).
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Though White is a pawn up and the pawn is only one square away from promotion, White can't make progress because his Rook is too passive (Black has his Rook behind the passed pawn-always a good thing to do as Variation One shows) and his King is unable to hide from the checks. Black can easily draw this position if he just moves his King from h7 to g7 (avoiding a skewer as seen in Variation Two) and checks the White King whenever it touches the pawn (which threatens to free the Rook of guard duty).
  • Place Rooks Behind Passed Pawns!

    One of the monster rules of Rook endgames states that you should always place your Rooks behind passed pawns. It doesn't matter who's passed pawn it is, just place your Rook behind it! In the present position the game will swing on who follows this piece of advice. If Black has the move (which he does) he draws while White to move would win.
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Black has correctly placed his Rook behind the passed pawn (Variation One shows how important this concept is) and the Black King is closer to the action. One would think that this means that Black should draw and, under normal circumstances, it would. However, Black has committed a big sin here and allowed a very important trick. This trick must be thoroughly understood since you will eventually be on both sides of it.
  • Passive Rook and two pawns vs. Rook

    Usually a two pawn advantage would easily win for White. However, in this position the White Rook is so passive that nothing can be done to generate any serious winning chances (it would also be a draw if the g-pawn was an h-pawn. This shows you that, when your Rook is misplaced in front of your pawn (see Variation One for a discussion about placing a Rook behind passed pawns), you should never advance your pawn to the seventh rank unless you have an instant win by doing so.
  • Place Rooks Behind Passed Pawns!

    One of the monster rules of Rook endgames states that you should always place your Rooks behind passed pawns. It doesn't matter who's passed pawn it is, just place your Rook behind it! In the present position the game will swing on who follows this piece of advice. If Black has the move (which he does) he draws while White to move would win.
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Though White is a pawn up and the pawn is only one square away from promotion, White can't make progress because his Rook is too passive (Black has his Rook behind the passed pawn-always a good thing to do as Variation One shows) and his King is unable to hide from the checks. Black can easily draw this position if he just moves his King from h7 to g7 (avoiding a skewer as seen in Variation Two) and checks the White King whenever it touches the pawn (which threatens to free the Rook of guard duty).
  • Passive Rook, pawn on seventh and f-pawn vs. Rook

    This position wins for White because the f-pawn will force the Black King to a losing square. Variation One showed that a g-pawn or h-pawn would not help White but this problem demonstrates that an f-pawn, e, d, c or b-pawn all make the win easy (even though the White Rook is horribly placed).
  • Passive Rook and two pawns vs. Rook

    Usually a two pawn advantage would easily win for White. However, in this position the White Rook is so passive that nothing can be done to generate any serious winning chances (it would also be a draw if the g-pawn was an h-pawn. This shows you that, when your Rook is misplaced in front of your pawn (see Variation One for a discussion about placing a Rook behind passed pawns), you should never advance your pawn to the seventh rank unless you have an instant win by doing so.
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Black has correctly placed his Rook behind the passed pawn (Variation One shows how important this concept is) and the Black King is closer to the action. One would think that this means that Black should draw and, under normal circumstances, it would. However, Black has committed a big sin here and allowed a very important trick. This trick must be thoroughly understood since you will eventually be on both sides of it.
  • Passive Rook and pawn on sixth vs. Rook

    White wins this position because his King can take over guard duty of a6 and release the entombed White Rook. Normally Black would use his Rook to check the White King away from its pawn. However, now White's King has access to the a7- square and this allows his to hide from the checks and win the game.
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Black has correctly placed his Rook behind the passed pawn (Variation One shows how important this concept is) and the Black King is closer to the action. One would think that this means that Black should draw and, under normal circumstances, it would. However, Black has committed a big sin here and allowed a very important trick. This trick must be thoroughly understood since you will eventually be on both sides of it.
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Though White is a pawn up and the pawn is only one square away from promotion, White can't make progress because his Rook is too passive (Black has his Rook behind the passed pawn-always a good thing to do as Variation One shows) and his King is unable to hide from the checks. Black can easily draw this position if he just moves his King from h7 to g7 (avoiding a skewer as seen in Variation Two) and checks the White King whenever it touches the pawn (which threatens to free the Rook of guard duty).
  • Rook and Rook-pawn on seventh vs. Rook

    In this problem the White pawn is one square away from Queening but its King is trapped in front of it, preventing the poor pawn from advancing. If the pawn was anything but a Rook-pawn, the game would be won for White (see a study of the Lucena Position in Variation One). However, since it's a Rook-pawn (which always presents problems for the stronger side) the only way White can win is to bring his Rook around to b8 or b7 and chase the Black Rook away so the King can get free. The following rule...
  • Rook and Rook-pawn on seventh vs. Rook

    In this problem the White pawn is one square away from Queening but its King is trapped in front of it, preventing the poor pawn from advancing. If the pawn was anything but a Rook-pawn, the game would be won for White (see a study of the Lucena Position in Variation One). However, since it's a Rook-pawn (which always presents problems for the stronger side) the only way White can win is to bring his Rook around to b8 or b7 and chase the Black Rook away so the King can get free. The following rule...
  • Passive Rook and two pawns vs. Rook and one pawn

    If Black didn't own his f-pawn the game would be easily won for White (as proven in Variation One). A nice maneuver forces the win of the Black pawn when the rest is a piece of cake. The zugzwang maneuver that White employs is only possible if the defending King's g7- square and its pawn is one square apart. If the Black pawn was on f4 (instead of the games f5) and the White pawn on f3, the game would be drawn since the attacker would not be able to take away g7 and attack the pawn at the same time.
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Though White is a pawn up and the pawn is only one square away from promotion, White can't make progress because his Rook is too passive (Black has his Rook behind the passed pawn-always a good thing to do as Variation One shows) and his King is unable to hide from the checks. Black can easily draw this position if he just moves his King from h7 to g7 (avoiding a skewer as seen in Variation Two) and checks the White King whenever it touches the pawn (which threatens to free the Rook of guard duty).
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Black has correctly placed his Rook behind the passed pawn (Variation One shows how important this concept is) and the Black King is closer to the action. One would think that this means that Black should draw and, under normal circumstances, it would. However, Black has committed a big sin here and allowed a very important trick. This trick must be thoroughly understood since you will eventually be on both sides of it.
  • Passive Rook, pawn on seventh and f-pawn vs. Rook

    This position wins for White because the f-pawn will force the Black King to a losing square. Variation One showed that a g-pawn or h-pawn would not help White but this problem demonstrates that an f-pawn, e, d, c or b-pawn all make the win easy (even though the White Rook is horribly placed).
  • Smyslov-Botvinnik, World Championship 1954

    This endgame would be confusing to most players, however a good understanding of Variations One and Two immediately tells you the dream positions that you would like to achieve. This shows that a working knowledge of basic situations allows you to easily solve otherwise difficult problems. In the position in question, Black must decide when to take on g5 and when to push his a- pawn to a2.
  • Passive Rook, pawn on seventh and f-pawn vs. Rook

    This position wins for White because the f-pawn will force the Black King to a losing square. Variation One showed that a g-pawn or h-pawn would not help White but this problem demonstrates that an f-pawn, e, d, c or b-pawn all make the win easy (even though the White Rook is horribly placed).
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Black has correctly placed his Rook behind the passed pawn and the Black King is closer to the action. One would think that this means that Black should draw and, under normal circumstances, it would. However, Black has committed a big sin here and allowed a very important trick. This trick must be thoroughly understood since you will eventually be on both sides of it.
  • Passive Rook and pawn on sixth vs. Rook

    White wins this position because his King can take over guard duty of a6 and release the entombed White Rook. Normally Black would use his Rook to check the White King away from its pawn. However, now White's King has access to the a7- square and this allows his to hide from the checks and win the game.
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Though White is a pawn up and the pawn is only one square away from promotion, White can't make progress because his Rook is too passive (Black has his Rook behind the passed pawn-always a good thing to do as Variation One shows) and his King is unable to hide from the checks. Black can easily draw this position if he just moves his King from h7 to g7 (avoiding a skewer as seen in Variation Two) and checks the White King whenever it touches the pawn (which threatens to free the Rook of guard duty).
  • Passive Rook and two pawns vs. Rook and one pawn

    If Black didn't own his f-pawn the game would be easily won for White (as proven in Variation One). A nice maneuver forces the win of the Black pawn when the rest is a piece of cake. The zugzwang maneuver that White employs is only possible if the defending King's g7- square and its pawn is one square apart. If the Black pawn was on f4 (instead of the games f5) and the White pawn on f3, the game would be drawn since the attacker would not be able to take away g7 and attack the pawn at the same time.
  • Rook and Rook-pawn on seventh vs. Rook

    In this problem the White pawn is one square away from Queening but its King is trapped in front of it, preventing the poor pawn from advancing. If the pawn was anything but a Rook-pawn, the game would be won for White (see a study of the Lucena Position in Variation One). However, since it's a Rook-pawn (which always presents problems for the stronger side) the only way White can win is to bring his Rook around to b8 or b7 and chase the Black Rook away so the King can get free. The following rule...
  • Rook and Rook-pawn on seventh vs. Rook

    In this problem the White pawn is one square away from Queening but its King is trapped in front of it, preventing the poor pawn from advancing. If the pawn was anything but a Rook-pawn, the game would be won for White (see a study of the Lucena Position in Variation One). However, since it's a Rook-pawn (which always presents problems for the stronger side) the only way White can win is to bring his Rook around to b8 or b7 and chase the Black Rook away so the King can get free. The following rule...
  • Rook and Rook-pawn on seventh vs. Rook

    In this problem the White pawn is one square away from Queening but its King is trapped in front of it, preventing the poor pawn from advancing. If the pawn was anything but a Rook-pawn, the game would be won for White (see a study of the Lucena Position in Variation One). However, since it's a Rook-pawn (which always presents problems for the stronger side) the only way White can win is to bring his Rook around to b8 or b7 and chase the Black Rook away so the King can get free. The following rule...
  • Rook and Rook-pawn on seventh vs. Rook

    In this problem the White pawn is one square away from Queening but its King is trapped in front of it, preventing the poor pawn from advancing. If the pawn was anything but a Rook-pawn, the game would be won for White (see a study of the Lucena Position in Variation One). However, since it's a Rook-pawn (which always presents problems for the stronger side) the only way White can win is to bring his Rook around to b8 or b7 and chase the Black Rook away so the King can get free. The following rule...
  • Passive Rook and two connected pawns vs. Rook

    Normally a two pawn advantage wins in a Rook and pawn endgame. When the material count is Rook and two connected passed pawns versus Rook one would think that the game is as good as over; normally they would be right! In this case, however, the White Rook is passively placed defending his b-pawn. This is quite unfortunate because the White pawns cannot advance and the White King has no way to hide from the upcoming series of checks. In general, then, we can say that a Rook and two connected passed...
  • Active Rook and two connected passed pawns versus Rook

    Two extra connected passed pawns usually win pretty easily in Rook and pawn endgames unless the stronger side's King or Rook are on extremely poor squares (see the Diagram for an example of a passive White Rook giving Black enough play to draw). In the present example White's Rook is well placed, the White King is not a horrible piece and the pawns are healthy. All the prerequisites are present for a White victory.
  • Active Rook and two connected passed pawns versus Rook

    Two extra connected passed pawns usually win pretty easily in Rook and pawn endgames unless the stronger side's King or Rook are on extremely poor squares (see the Diagram for an example of a passive White Rook giving Black enough play to draw). In the present example White's Rook is well placed, the White King is not a horrible piece and the pawns are healthy. All the prerequisites are present for a White victory.
  • Passive Rook and two connected pawns vs. Rook

    Normally a two pawn advantage wins in a Rook and pawn endgame. When the material count is Rook and two connected passed pawns versus Rook one would think that the game is as good as over; normally they would be right! In this case, however, the White Rook is passively placed defending his b-pawn. This is quite unfortunate because the White pawns cannot advance and the White King has no way to hide from the upcoming series of checks. In general, then, we can say that a Rook and two connected passed...
  • Rook and two connected passed pawns vs. Rook and pawn

    A Rook and two connected passed pawns almost always beats a Rook and pawn. The only exceptions occur when the pawns are blockaded or the stronger sides Rook is very poorly placed. Since neither of these things are present, White can gain the full point.
  • Place Rooks Behind Passed Pawns!

    One of the monster rules of Rook endgames states that you should always place your Rooks behind passed pawns. It doesn't matter who's passed pawn it is, just place your Rook behind it! In the present position the game will swing on who follows this piece of advice. If Black has the move (which he does) he draws while White to move would win.
  • Bishops of opposite colors: One pawn vs. none

    Opposite colored Bishops reside on the same board but are fated never to touch (Former World Champion Boris Spassky once compared his ex-wife and himself to Bishops of opposite colors...in the same home but never connecting). This means that they are quite useful in the middlegame (since one can attack something that the other can't defend) but become rather drawish in endgames. In the present problem we see White with an extra pawn and a superior King but no winning chances at all. Why? Because...
  • Bishops of opposite colors

    White is two pawns up but the presence of Bishops of opposite colors (and the blockade that the Black King and Bishop have created) makes the win impossible. In general, a two pawn plus will win if a blockade can be prevented. It stands to reason then, that the superior sides winning chances will grow as the pawns get further and further apart (see the Variation for an example of this). Here the pawns are close, so the game is drawn.
  • Bishops of opposite colors

    White is two pawns up and will win easily because the pawns are so far apart. This distance between the pawns stops any blockades on Black's part (see the Variation for an example of a successful blockade) and allows the material advantage to tell. The winning technique consists of tying the Black King down on one side of the board and then using the pawn on the other side to win the Black Bishop. The resulting Bishop and pawn versus King position is resignable.
  • Bishop and wrong colored Rook-pawn vs. King

    White is a piece and pawn ahead yet he can't win. This may seem unjust (and it is!) but it shows why Rook-pawns must be viewed with such suspicion. If White had a dark-squared Bishop he would win easily since then he could force the Black King off of h8. Unfortunately, White's light-squared Bishop can't bother the Black King in any way. Of course, usually an extra piece and pawn would add up to an easy victory. However, if the pawn is a Rook pawn and if the Bishop can't control the Queening square...
  • Bishops of opposite colors

    White is two pawns up and will win easily because the pawns are so far apart. This distance between the pawns stops any blockades on Black's part (see the Variation for an example of a successful blockade) and allows the material advantage to tell. The winning technique consists of tying the Black King down on one side of the board and then using the pawn on the other side to win the Black Bishop. The resulting Bishop and pawn versus King position is resignable.
  • Bishops of opposite colors

    White is two pawns up but the presence of Bishops of opposite colors (and the blockade that the Black King and Bishop have created) makes the win impossible. In general, a two pawn plus will win if a blockade can be prevented. It stands to reason then, that the superior sides winning chances will grow as the pawns get further and further apart (see the Variation for an example of this). Here the pawns are close, so the game is drawn.
  • Bishops of opposite colors

    White's pawns are far apart from each other. This normally favors the stronger side (see Variation One) since Black won't be able to blockade both pawns. White would usually expect to win such a position by tying the Black King down on the kingside (it is needed to stop the h-pawn) and then winning the Black Bishop by pushing the a-pawn. The flaw is that, after Black loses his Bishop, the resulting position is a freak draw because the White Bishop can't help its pawn promote (as shown in Variation...
  • Bishops of opposite colors

    White is two pawns up and will win easily because the pawns are so far apart. This distance between the pawns stops any blockades on Black's part (see the Variation for an example of a successful blockade) and allows the material advantage to tell. The winning technique consists of tying the Black King down on one side of the board and then using the pawn on the other side to win the Black Bishop. The resulting Bishop and pawn versus King position is resignable.
  • Bishop and wrong colored Rook-pawn vs. King

    White is a piece and pawn ahead yet he can't win. This may seem unjust (and it is!) but it shows why Rook-pawns must be viewed with such suspicion. If White had a dark-squared Bishop he would win easily since then he could force the Black King off of h8. Unfortunately, White's light-squared Bishop can't bother the Black King in any way. Of course, usually an extra piece and pawn would add up to an easy victory. However, if the pawn is a Rook pawn and if the Bishop can't control the Queening square...
  • Knight and pawn vs. lone King

    A piece and a pawn almost always defeat a lone King. The only exceptions occur when Rook-pawns exist. In the present position the game would be drawn if the pawn stood on the seventh rank. The fact that it is on the sixth rank (which doesn't give Black any stalemate possibilities) makes the win easy for White.
  • Bishops of opposite colors: two pawns vs. none

    Usually the side with two pawns versus none (in a Bishop of opposite color endgame) wants his/her pawns to be far apart so no blockade is possible (see Variation One for an example of this kind of blockade). If the pawns are connected (as is the case here), the defender can still draw if he/she knows the proper defensive formation. The position under discussion is not the proper formation (see Variation Two for the proper formation) and, to make matters worse, Black doesn't have time to set the proper...
  • Bishops of opposite colors

    White is two pawns up and will win easily because the pawns are so far apart. This distance between the pawns stops any blockades on Black's part (see the Variation for an example of a successful blockade) and allows the material advantage to tell. The winning technique consists of tying the Black King down on one side of the board and then using the pawn on the other side to win the Black Bishop. The resulting Bishop and pawn versus King position is resignable.
  • Bishops of opposite colors: two pawns vs. none

    White is up two pawns and they are powerfully placed on the fifth rank. Unfortunately for White, these pawns won't ever be able to go anywhere because Black has obtained the optimum defensive setup. This setup calls for the King and Bishop to both be eyeing the d6-square (if the pawns are on d5 and e5) so that d6+ can be met by ...Bxd6 when White won't be able to prove a win with a Bishop and King versus a lone King. More importantly, the Bishop must be attacking the White e-pawn, thereby forcing...
  • Bishops of opposite colors: two pawns vs. none

    White is up two pawns and they are powerfully placed on the fifth rank. Unfortunately for White, these pawns won't ever be able to go anywhere because Black has obtained the optimum defensive setup. This setup calls for the King and Bishop to both be eyeing the d6-square (if the pawns are on d5 and e5) so that d6+ can be met by ...Bxd6 when White won't be able to prove a win with a Bishop and King versus a lone King. More importantly, the Bishop must be attacking the White e-pawn, thereby forcing...
  • Bishops of opposite colors: two pawns vs. none

    Usually the side with two pawns versus none (in a Bishop of opposite color endgame) wants his/her pawns to be far apart so no blockade is possible (see Variation One for an example of this kind of blockade). If the pawns are connected (as is the case here), the defender can still draw if he/she knows the proper defensive formation. The position under discussion is not the proper formation (see Variation Two for the proper formation) and, to make matters worse, Black doesn't have time to set the proper...
  • Bishops of opposite colors: Two pawns vs. none

    White has two extra connected passed pawns but at the moment they are not very far up the board. How can Black make use of this fact to set up the ideal defensive position (for more on this ideal position, see Variation One)?
  • Bishops of opposite colors: two pawns vs. none

    White is up two pawns and they are powerfully placed on the fifth rank. Unfortunately for White, these pawns won't ever be able to go anywhere because Black has obtained the optimum defensive setup. This setup calls for the King and Bishop to both be eyeing the d6-square (if the pawns are on d5 and e5) so that d6+ can be met by ...Bxd6 when White won't be able to prove a win with a Bishop and King versus a lone King. More importantly, the Bishop must be attacking the White e-pawn, thereby forcing...
  • Bishops of opposite colors: two pawns vs. none

    Usually the side with two pawns versus none (in a Bishop of opposite color endgame) wants his/her pawns to be far apart so no blockade is possible (see Variation One for an example of this kind of blockade). If the pawns are connected (as is the case here), the defender can still draw if he/she knows the proper defensive formation. The position under discussion is not the proper formation (see Variation Two for the proper formation) and, to make matters worse, Black doesn't have time to set the proper...
  • Bishops of opposite colors: three pawns vs. one

    Black has set up the ideal defensive formation (as shown in Variation One) but the presence of the extra set of pawns allows White to claim an easy win. Why? If those pawns on a5 and a4 didn't exist then winning the Black Bishop by d5-d6+ would leave White with insufficient material to force victory (King and Bishop can't force a mate versus a lone King). However, the extra pawns allow White (after he wins the Black Bishop) to pick up the bit on a5 and then promote his own pawn on a4. In general...
  • Bishops of opposite colors: two pawns vs. none

    White is up two pawns and they are powerfully placed on the fifth rank. Unfortunately for White, these pawns won't ever be able to go anywhere because Black has obtained the optimum defensive setup. This setup calls for the King and Bishop to both be eyeing the d6-square (if the pawns are on d5 and e5) so that d6+ can be met by ...Bxd6 when White won't be able to prove a win with a Bishop and King versus a lone King. More importantly, the Bishop must be attacking the White e-pawn, thereby forcing...
  • Bishop and wrong colored Rook-pawn vs. King

    White is a piece and pawn ahead yet he can't win. This may seem unjust (and it is!) but it shows why Rook-pawns must be viewed with such suspicion. If White had a dark-squared Bishop he would win easily since then he could force the Black King off of h8. Unfortunately, White's light-squared Bishop can't bother the Black King in any way. Of course, usually an extra piece and pawn would add up to an easy victory. However, if the pawn is a Rook pawn and if the Bishop can't control the Queening square...
  • Queen versus e-pawn on seventh

    White has an extra Queen but the Black pawn is on the verge of promotion. If the pawn makes it to e8 the game will be drawn. However, even if White somehow stops the pawn from moving up one square, how can he win without the help of his King? White's goals are clear: to stop the pawn from advancing and to somehow get his King over to the embattled sector. This example allows us to state the following rule: If the White King is far away and the Black pawn is on the seventh rank, the Queen easily...
  • Queen versus f-pawn on seventh

    Variation One gives a similar position that turns out to be an easy win for White. It looks like this should be the same but, strangely enough, Black can draw by force! This example (along with Variations One and Two) allows us to state the following rule: If the White King is far away and the Black pawn is on the seventh rank, the defender can only draw if his pawn is a Rook-pawn or Bishop-pawn. The Queen easily wins against Knight-pawns, Queen-pawns and King-pawns.
  • Queen versus Rook-pawn on seventh

    White is up a Queen for a pawn but he can't win the game because his King is too far away. Any King move will allow the pawn to promote and sticking the Black King on h1 can easily lead to a stalemate. This example (along with Variations One and Two) allows us to state the following rule: If the White King is far away and the Black pawn is on the seventh rank, the defender can only draw if his pawn is a Rook-pawn or Bishop-pawn. The Queen easily wins against Knight-pawns, Queen-pawns and King-pawns.
  • Queen versus f-pawn on seventh

    Variation One gives a similar position that turns out to be an easy win for White. It looks like this should be the same but, strangely enough, Black can draw by force! This example (along with Variations One and Two) allows us to state the following rule: If the White King is far away and the Black pawn is on the seventh rank, the defender can only draw if his pawn is a Rook-pawn or Bishop-pawn. The Queen easily wins against Knight-pawns, Queen-pawns and King-pawns.
  • Queen versus e-pawn on seventh

    White has an extra Queen but the Black pawn is on the verge of promotion. If the pawn makes it to e8 the game will be drawn. However, even if White somehow stops the pawn from moving up one square, how can he win without the help of his King? White's goals are clear: to stop the pawn from advancing and to somehow get his King over to the embattled sector. This example allows us to state the following rule: If the White King is far away and the Black pawn is on the seventh rank, the Queen easily...
  • Queen versus Rook-pawn on seventh

    White is up a Queen for a pawn but he can't win the game because his King is too far away. Any King move will allow the pawn to promote and sticking the Black King on h1 can easily lead to a stalemate. This example (along with Variations One and Two) allows us to state the following rule: If the White King is far away and the Black pawn is on the seventh rank, the defender can only draw if his pawn is a Rook-pawn or Bishop-pawn. The Queen easily wins against Knight-pawns, Queen-pawns and King-pawns.
  • Queen versus Rook-pawn on seventh

    White is up a Queen for a pawn but he can't win the game because his King is too far away. Any King move will allow the pawn to promote and sticking the Black King on h1 can easily lead to a stalemate. This example (along with Variations One and Two) allows us to state the following rule: If the White King is far away and the Black pawn is on the seventh rank, the defender can only draw if his pawn is a Rook-pawn or Bishop-pawn. The Queen easily wins against Knight-pawns, Queen-pawns and King-pawns.
  • Queen versus e-pawn on seventh

    White has an extra Queen but the Black pawn is on the verge of promotion. If the pawn makes it to e8 the game will be drawn. However, even if White somehow stops the pawn from moving up one square, how can he win without the help of his King? White's goals are clear: to stop the pawn from advancing and to somehow get his King over to the embattled sector. This example allows us to state the following rule: If the White King is far away and the Black pawn is on the seventh rank, the Queen easily...
  • Queen versus f-pawn on seventh

    Variation One gives a similar position that turns out to be an easy win for White. It looks like this should be the same but, strangely enough, Black can draw by force! This example (along with Variations One and Two) allows us to state the following rule: If the White King is far away and the Black pawn is on the seventh rank, the defender can only draw if his pawn is a Rook-pawn or Bishop-pawn. The Queen easily wins against Knight-pawns, Queen-pawns and King-pawns.
  • Queen versus Rook-pawn on seventh

    The Variation shows us that Rook-pawns on the seventh usually draw a Queen if the King is far away. However, if the King can get within the h5-d5-d1 square he should be victorious. White wins this problem because his King gets close enough to just do the job.
  • Queen versus Rook-pawn on seventh

    White is up a Queen for a pawn but he can't win the game because his King is too far away. Any King move will allow the pawn to promote and sticking the Black King on h1 can easily lead to a stalemate. This example (along with Variations One and Two) allows us to state the following rule: If the White King is far away and the Black pawn is on the seventh rank, the defender can only draw if his pawn is a Rook-pawn or Bishop-pawn. The Queen easily wins against Knight-pawns, Queen-pawns and King-pawns.
  • Queen versus pawn on sixth

    White always wins a Queen versus pawn on the sixth rank position- it doesn't matter what pawn the defender has or how far away White's King is. In the present position Black has a Rook-pawn (which usually gives him the best drawing chances-see the Variation for proof of this) but even here the situation is hopeless.
  • Queen versus Rook-pawn on seventh

    White is up a Queen for a pawn but he can't win the game because his King is too far away. Any King move will allow the pawn to promote and sticking the Black King on h1 can easily lead to a stalemate. This example (along with Variations One and Two) allows us to state the following rule: If the White King is far away and the Black pawn is on the seventh rank, the defender can only draw if his pawn is a Rook-pawn or Bishop-pawn. The Queen easily wins against Knight-pawns, Queen-pawns and King-pawns.
  • Passive Rook and pawn on sixth vs. Rook. The Tarrasch Defense

    Black's Rook can't get behind the passed pawn and his King is far away. Sounds bad, doesn't it? Black can still draw, however, by using a defense that some attribute to the German Grandmaster S. Tarrasch. Black needs to use his Rook to block the enemy King and to keep the White Rook under wraps. Do you see how to make your Rook do both these jobs at the same time?
  • Rook and pawn vs. active Rook behind passer

    Though White is a pawn up and the pawn is only one square away from promotion, White can't make progress because his Rook is too passive (Black has his Rook behind the passed pawn-always a good thing to do as Variation One shows) and his King is unable to hide from the checks. Black can easily draw this position if he just moves his King from h7 to g7 (avoiding a skewer as seen in Variation Two) and checks the White King whenever it touches the pawn (which threatens to free the Rook of guard duty).

Online Now