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  • Silman's Lessons in Strategy (1)

    Avg Rating: 1750
    Lessons in Strategy (1) - IM Jeremy Silman This module contains 50 very instructive positional challenges. Some are very long (exceeding 20 moves and one lasts 40 moves), and experts and masters (USCF or Elo ratings above 2000) will not find many of these to be easy. A novice or intermediate level player (USCF or Elo ratings below 2000) will find these challenges quite difficult, but they will learn a bit more with each attempt, all the way until they reach master or higher.
  • Silman's Lessons in Strategy (2)

    Avg Rating: 1698
    Lessons in Strategy (2) - IM Jeremy Silman This module continues with strategic positional challenges similar in difficulty to those contained in Silman's Lessons in Chess Strategy (1). Some are very long, and experts and masters (USCF or Elo ratings above 2000) will not find many of these to be easy. A novice or intermediate level player (USCF or Elo ratings below 2000) will find these challenges quite difficult, but they will learn a bit more with each attempt, all the way until they reach master...
  • Roots of Positional Understanding

    Avg Rating: 2067
    The Roots of Positional Understanding, by IM Jeremy Silman. Are you ever at a loss for what to do when there are no immediate tactics in sight? If so, then you need to learn the basics of positional play. The master seems to optimally place his pieces with effortless ease where they coordinate well and control key lines and squares. This is because he sees the board as a structural entity. Using 300 hundred brief Challenges, Silman gives you the basics of this same positional sense and vision....
  • The Art of Exchanging Pieces

    Avg Rating: 1784
    There are many occasions when an attack isn't possible and positional chess is the order of the day. This means you try to create various favorable imbalances (space, superior minor pieces, weak squares, fractured enemy pawns, etc.) and milk it for all its worth. This particular course explores the eternal question of piece trades: should you or should you not trade one minor piece for another, your Rook for his, or your all-powerful Queen for his equally imposing female deity? At times a trade...
  • Recognizing the Opponent's Moves

    Avg Rating: 1561
    In this course you will learn to think about the opponent's moves and ideas when considering how you should continue. As you are able to recognize your opponent's moves and plans you will be better able to plan ahead for success.
  • Strategic Errors

    Avg Rating: 1730
    Strategic errors are played at every level of the game. However, in the amateur ranks, strategic mistakes are a dime a dozen. Nevertheless, just because a move might be strategically dubious doesn't mean that it will be punished. This course will help you become more aware of strategic errors, and will help you strive to milk every drop of juicy goodness from your opponent's mistaken concept. Conversely, this course will also convince you that implementing such "attractive" but flawed strategic...
  • Play Against Bobby Fischer

    Avg Rating: 1652
    To have successful results in chess you must do well in critical positions. The first task is to recognize a critical position - for example one in which your opponent has created a threat or the one when you have an opportunity to create or execute a threat. The second task is to assess such situation properly and come up with quality move-candidates. Finally, using calculation as well as your knowledge base, to come up with the best move. Experienced players go through...
  • Weak Color Complexes Explained

    Avg Rating: 1358
    Being sensitive to weak color complexes provides extremely important insight into positional and tactical chess play. It often shapes the entire middlegame struggle, and informs the decisions made as early as the opening phase of the game. Yet many players don't even know what a "weak color complex" is; and many others have heard of it, but partly wonder if it's an artificial abstraction invented by secret grand mages of chess's professional society in order to cloud their art in obscurity. But...
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