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resignitsonlyagame
resignitsonlyagame
Location: United States
Joined: 5/19/16
Last Online: 5/19/16
Points: 0 points
resignorwait30mins
resignorwait30mins
Location: SSDDV, United Kingdom
Joined: 4/21/16
Last Online: 4/21/16
Points: 0 points
ResignKingMaster
ResignKingMaster
Location: South Korea
Joined: 4/12/16
Last Online: 4/13/16
Points: 0 points
ResignKing
ResignKing
Location: South Korea
Joined: 4/12/16
Last Online: 4/12/16
Points: 0 points
resign2soon
resign2soon
Location: United States
Joined: 3/22/16
Last Online: 3/22/16
Points: 0 points

  • Siamese Chess

         In 1826 Johann Mälzel was amazing and mystifying the American public with his exhibition of the chess automation known as the Turk. Just a few years later, that same public would marvel at a living, sometimes chess-... | Read More

  • Touch-Move Rule Adventures

    I am probably a lucky guy, because I never had any "touch-move rule" episodes in my whole chess career.  Don't get me wrong, it happened numerous times in my games that either I or my opponent touched a wrong piece at a wrong time, but i... | Read More

  • 7 Bullet Chess Tips By Hikaru

    Editor’s note: Last week, Hikaru Nakamura achieved the highest bullet rating in Chess.com history at 3262. He is widely considered the best speed chess player in history. A vote by titled players confirmed this last year. Want to get ... | Read More

  • Brenzinger the Forgotten

    Francis Eugene Brenzinger has been mostly forgotten.        It's true that he wasn't even close to being a world champion contender, maybe not even a likely U.S. champion, but during his chess-playing days, he was... | Read More

  • Surprise Mating Attacks

         The following is a reprint of a charming article composed by Al Horowitz in "Chess Review," Nov. 1953. Of course, this version has been updated to Algebraic Notation with the digital supplanting the physical. Al Horow... | Read More


    • Learning from the Greatest Blunder

      The greatest chess blunder is resigning when you were winning.   Okay, I didn't make this mistake, but I made the second biggest chess blunder. Offering a draw (perpetual check) when I was winning.   Above all, this highlighted to me a major... | Read More

    • My Tactical Achilles Heel: Discovered Attack

      The first stage in fixing a problem is recognising you have a problem. If there is one tactical short coming I wish I could recognise faster, better and improve, it's the discovered attack performed on me. In a number of games now I've had example... | Read More

    • Protect Your King

      Chess Minatures generally have a number of common traits.  In my game on the Black side of an Advanced Caro Kann, my opponent resigned after 11 moves due to the forced loss of the exchange. I tried to gather what I could learn from this game, a... | Read More

    • Road to the 2000s: #1 Reaching the 1000s!

      Hey everyone and welcome to my first blog post of the Road to the 2000s series where I keep everyone updated about my journey to that rating. It will be a long journey, I'll tell you that.   But recently, I played in the 2016 Ice Harbor Schola... | Read More

      • Sengdao
      • | May 19, 2016
      • | 216 views
      • | 3 comments
    • Two nice mates in best of 5

      Played  a best of 5 against another chess.com player, and had two really fun mating patterns.  Posting it mainly for memory sake :) In this one he resigned when there was forced mate, unfortunately -- but after this position he can't stop Qh7+,... | Read More


Video Lessons



  • Checkmate

    • 97 Reads
    • | 97 Reads

    Checkmate (frequently shortened to mate) is a situation in chess in which one player's king is in check and there is no way to remove that threat; it is a check from which there is no legal move to remove check through either capturing the pie... Read More »

  • Bardeleben, Curt von

    • 2 Reads
    • | 2 Reads

    Curt von Bardeleben (1861-1924) was a German count and the strongest German player of the late 19th century, an openings expert, and player of Grandmaster strength.  He studied law, but never practiced, preferring to play chess. He was German cha... Read More »

  • Capablanca, Jose

    • 163 Reads
    • | 163 Reads

    Cuban-born, Jose Capablanca (1888-1942) was American-educated and sent to a private school (Woodycliff School of South Orange) in New Jersey when he was 16 in 1904.  He joined the Manhattan Chess Club at that time and impressed many of the pl... Read More »