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6/11/2016 - Endgame Finesse

  • #121

    black has to play poorly in order for white to win, using the prescribed moves .. but can easily prevent pawn promotions to ensure a win

     

  • #122

    Question, why dark Knight does not take bishop on e4?

  • #123

    fleveneur,

    If the king takes the bishop, pawn takes pawn for check, king takes checking pawn, other pawn takes only remaining black pawn in the group.  While the black king tries to mop up remaining white pawns, white king goes to other end of board and kills the last remaining black pawn... then unstoppably promotes his own white pawn for the win.

  • #124

    EASY

  • #125
    w3k4 wrote:

    black has to play poorly in order for white to win, using the prescribed moves .. but can easily prevent pawn promotions to ensure a win

     

    If white plays precise moves, black cannot prevent white from winning.

  • #126

    If he captured bishop ---then white is to take pawn to check the king ----h3 pawn was easy and sure to generate the queen at h8

  • #127

    I need to know why my "tactics" is locked? I paid for "Diamond" for a year.

  • #128

    Wow! That was a lot of fun! Wasn't it?

    Thanks chess.com!

    Goodnight!

  • #129
    vineet38 wrote:

    If he captured bishop ---then white is to take pawn to check the king ----h3 pawn was easy and sure to generate the queen at h8

    If 4...Ke4 5. gxf3+ Kxf3 6. gxh4 then with best play from black the white pawn that will queen will be the a-pawn.

  • #130

    what's fp?

  • #131
    connerperrine wrote:

    I dont understand bishop e4 a white clearly has the game in almost ever situation, my sacrifice the bishop

    It appears you don't quite understand the position.

  • #132
    kingcobra07 wrote:

    White has to put the bishop there to save himself from a black queen, but the interesting part is that it does work even if the bishop is captured, but if so, then the black king loses its position in being able to get back to prevent the white a pawn.  This is a very rich and complex puzzle.  I'm looking down the road here and this looks like a draw as both sides will queen in 6 moves with an A pawn each, there's nothing that white can do to stop the black queen and he has to look to first block and then promote his pawn.

    The first part of your comment made it appear you truly understood the meaning of this puzzle, but the last part of your comment seems to indicate that you don't quite understand it fully.  Perhaps I am just misinterpreting what you are trying to say.

  • #133
    vagrawal15 wrote:

    but why bishop has to m ake that move only?

    If white doesn't play 4. Be4 or 4. gxf3 then black will queen with 4...fxg2.  And if 4. gxf3 then black will queen after 4...h3.  So that leaves 4. Be4 as the only winning (as well as non-losing) move for white.

  • #134

    👍

  • #135
    NormanInvasion wrote:

    The important question, to me, is HOW did black KNOW not to capture the B at e4? 

    Black might as well have captured the bishop because after 4. Be4 white has secured a won game.  The purpose of the moves in the puzzle are just to make white play one extra move to make the won game obvious.

  • #136

    easy

  • #137
    BryanCFB wrote:
    kingcobra07 wrote:

    White has to put the bishop there to save himself from a black queen, but the interesting part is that it does work even if the bishop is captured, but if so, then the black king loses its position in being able to get back to prevent the white a pawn.  This is a very rich and complex puzzle.  I'm looking down the road here and this looks like a draw as both sides will queen in 6 moves with an A pawn each, there's nothing that white can do to stop the black queen and he has to look to first block and then promote his pawn.

    The first part of your comment made it appear you truly understood the meaning of this puzzle, but the last part of your comment seems to indicate that you don't quite understand it fully.  Perhaps I am just misinterpreting what you are trying to say.

    I think you may mean after 4. Be4 if play goes 4...h3 5. gxh3 Kxe4 that black could go into a race to see who queens first, and both sides would queen in six moves.  In this case though white queens in five, and then black still has two moves to queen, a huge difference. 

  • #138

    In my posted analysis, in the sideline 4...h3 5. gxh3 Kxe4 I chose 6. h4, but slightly stonger is 6. g4 because the way I played it out after 6. h4 white queened the h-pawn and dropped the g-pawn, and if played out the same way after 6. g4 then the g-pawn will queen and the h-pawn will be retained (if the h-pawn is captured after white queens then 11. Qg1, and white can more easily end up with two queens than in the 6. h4 line!).

  • #139

    Nice and easy

  • #140

    *

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