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Leonid Meteor

  • benws
  • | Jul 21, 2012
  • | 4293 views
  • | 8 comments

Leonid Stein was one of the great Soviet chess grandmasters of the 1960s. The Ukranian won three USSSR Championships, and came up short in several attempts at becoming world champion. Several times, Stein qualified for the Candidates' Tournament (which used to determine the challenger for the championship) by placing high in various Interzonal tournaments, but as a result of a rule allowing just three USSR players to take place in it, Stein came up just short. At the peak of his career, Stein died of a heart attack at the age of 38. Here is one of his best games (in my opinion), showcasing the strength of two connected passed pawns.



Comments


  • 2 years ago

    alexVL47

    It's a pity that Stein's life ended so early. His future opportunities could be brilliant.

  • 2 years ago

    DavidPetty

    Roman Dzindzichashvili has 2 fantastic "Greatest Chess Minds" videos coming out about Stein in the near future. Look forward to them!

  • 2 years ago

    Master_Po

    OH, thanks Spock.  I thought that d4 and c4 for white WAS the QG.  But it is not unless black plays d5 then.  I've been playing sometimes that King's Indian then and didn't know it. 

      So are the first 6 moves a good response for the KID?

  • 2 years ago

    Master_Po

    The first 6 moves for black - is this a good opening defense against the Queen's Gambit?

  • 2 years ago

    Boargo

    Wow shakespeare, I didn't realize people as smart as you actually existed.

  • 2 years ago

    shakespeare123

    His overall record against Gligoric: 7:1 1 draw tells a lot about Leonid Stein. Big blunders in this game:

    31. Bf6?? - after Re1 Qc2 32. d7 the position is resignable for black

    41. Qh6?? in the position he has the latent threat g6 Qh7 - why to give up the grip on the position and change Queens? c3 and black is lost - because the black Q has to stay behind the g pawn - the white pawn advance in the center would be unstoppable

    45.c6??? terrible move giving black the decicive diagonal a2-f7 Kg2 to control the f pawn and next move c6 would have done the job

    56. Rh8 was really a nice last try :-)

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