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Openings for Tactical Players: Budapest Gambit

  • GM Gserper
  • | Apr 18, 2010
  • | 17898 views
  • | 46 comments

The Budapest Gambit is a rare case of a gambit which is popular amongst both amateurs and top professionals. Amateurs and club players really like the variety of opening traps there.  Here is one of the most popular traps. Even though it is very well known, it still keeps claiming new victims. (Please remember that you can always replay the whole game from the first move if you click "Solution" and then "Move list").

 

The Budapest gambit's appeal to top GMs can be explained by the next story. GM Milan Vidmar was supposed to play Black against legendary Akiba Rubinstein in the first round of a big international tournament. He was at a loss what to play against the "great Akiba", who was feared for his dry, positional style of play.  To beat Rubinstein with the Black pieces was almost an impossible task. Vidmar asked his friend Istvan Abonyi for advice.  Abonyi, the developer of the Budapest Gambit, showed  his invention and recommended to give it a try.  The next day Vidmar managed to beat Rubinstein in less than 25 moves!! He was so inspired by this win, that he went on to win the whole tournament, and so the official life of the Budapest Gambit started.  Here is the game:
The Budapest Gambit has many tricky variations and traps, so if you decide to include it in your opening repertoire, you need to do some research.  Today I want to show one venomous idea which is very dangerous even when your opponent knows what to do.  But against the players who never saw it before, this line scores close to 100%! I am talking about the tricky line in the main variation of the Budapest gambit, where Black plays a7-a5 and then lifts his Rook to a6 and then to h6.  Coupled with a potential Qh4 move Black attacks becomes very dangerous.  See how then young Vladimir Kramnik annihilated his opponent:
Do you like the idea?  Ok, here is a quizz to test your attacking skills in the Budapest Gambit:
The Budapest Gambit is a very dangerous weapon, so if you like to attack, you can include it in your opening repertoire, or at least give it a try in one of your games and see if your opponent can withstand the assault.
Good luck!

Comments


  • 2 weeks ago

    Moonblaster11

  • 3 months ago

    fellacy

    good article.

  • 7 months ago

    Plasming

    What I want to know is- How do I defend against the Budapest Gambait?

  • 8 months ago

    johnnyxtrom

    I like this tutorial, as Budapest player I should be able to post a few more wins. Unfortuately my losses currently out weight my wins in the BDG.

  • 8 months ago

    knide

    Good opening for black to counter white double pawn on queen and Bishop

  • 22 months ago

    mapearson1990

    Posting so that I can find my way back to this article. As a Budapest player on occasion, this was excellent training and a guide.

  • 4 years ago

    Ajetovsk

    The funny thing about this gambit is that, it works against "more than" averagely good chess players...the guys that don't know much about chess don't fall for this trick!...lol!

  • 4 years ago

    Rolos05

    I gave it a shot in a tournament and it worked for me.  Thanks

  • 4 years ago

    kingsboy

    An eye opener I thought my d4c4 was unbeatable but this is frightening

  • 4 years ago

    BORIKAN

    well ...i was at a tournament and this A strength player was going on about how good he was and giving his 'insight' on how he had studied this and that,and only certain openings are worth looking into...anyway i spoke up and said not everybody is prepared for everything, me being a lowly C player[at best] prompted him to challenge me to a game...i went with black pcs. pulled out the BUDAPEST[i figured what the heck] long story short he lost his queen in trying to overplay the position...he simply walked off?!! no hand shake goodgame nada??!  i am sure he turned around and used it on someone else and bragged about,but he will be very much afraid to challenge an unknown.

  • 4 years ago

    BORIKAN

    well ,i like openings like this, either you do well with it or not,but you have fun for the most part, i often have opponents complaining[!??] that i did not use a 'regular' opening response.....

  • 4 years ago

    bernjava

    i tried budapest but i don't know how the response to white's 4th move- Q to d4

  • 4 years ago

    hussainaljaf

    great compensations and winning chance for the black in this opening ,also it leads nearly always to an early end for the game

  • 4 years ago

    simpledimple

    white needs to play 4. Nf3 followed by 5.Bg5.

  • 4 years ago

    simpledimple

    I HAD USED THIS LONG AGO JUST FOR THE DOUBLED PAWN OR THE BAD BISHOP IT COULD CREATE ON WHITE. BUT I HAD NO IDEA IT HAD THIS MUCH POTENTIAL. PERHAPS IT IS BEST FOR WHITE TO DECLINE IT.  THANKS MUCH.

  • 4 years ago

    kerver73

    Really great games!Budapest Gambit is so interesting,...i am so thirsty to try it...

    Kramnik's game was just spectacular...

  • 4 years ago

    offtherook

    azure9: There are lines where white holds onto the pawn, but at the cost of slower development and a crippled queenside pawn structure (doubled isolated c pawns). That particular line is regarded as roughly equal, as are most of the lines where white returns the pawn. Bf4 is no better than Nf3; in fact one will usually just transpose to the other. 

     

    I gave the Budapest another couple tries in fast games earlier, and it worked reasonably well. Against a prepared opponent, it seems to offer equality but nothing more. I guess I shouldn't complain since black's goal is supposedly to equalize, but I want a chance to fight for the win, and I don't feel like the Budapest really gives me that.

  • 4 years ago

    broshahir

    how to deal if white start with e4 instead of d4?

  • 4 years ago

    Estragon

    silaskulkarni ~ Black's threats are bring his Queen to h4 and mate the denuded White King, aided as possible by the Rh6, Ne5, Bc5, and even the Re8 via e6. 

    You are somewhat correct after 16...Rxh3, looking more closely White can defend with 17 Bg4 gaining a tempo on the Rook, after ...Rh6  18 Ng3 Qh4  19 Bh5 g6  20 Kg2! giving back the piece to block Black's h-file, although Black now remains a doubled but passed pawn up, there is no direct win that I can see, as the attack seems thwarted.  Other White attempts seem quickly overwhelmed with the ideas mentioned before.

     

    However, that variation should be blamed on me and not on Legky, because he had an immediate win after 16 gxh3 with 16 ...Qh4! as after 17 Bg4 Nxg4  18 Qxg4 Rg6 wins the Queen (19 Qxg6 would be hopeless with his King so exposed).

  • 4 years ago

    Archaic71

    Mr. Serper, Iget the distinct suspicion that you yourself are rather fond of the Budapest Gambit.  Nice article, I may finally have something to get me out of the boring and deep KID

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