Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Adding weight to pieces


  • 15 months ago · Quote · #61

    MaximRecoil

    mldavis617 wrote:

    My only purpose here was to warn of the potential toxicity of handling lead.  Since the MSDS data sheets are wrong, since lead phobia is overtaking common sense, and since there is absolutely no danger in handling lead, you need to take your argument to the scientific community, not spam a chess thread with denial.  All I'm asking is for people to use it at their own risk after reading the legitimate literature.  You have the rights to your own opinion based on your own, unscientific history.  End of discussion.

    Given your complete lack of arguments here (your straw men and various other fallacies don't count), your tacit concession of every point of contention is noted. Your third resignation (bolded), is also noted.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #62

    konhidras

    Does it even occured to anyone in this thread that a player who picked his nose before a game without washing hands started to play a game thereby touching the pieces. And the next players using the pieces afterwards are unware of what the previous player did to pieces ( i even see players subconciously bite their fingers during a game as a mannerism). Now the question is, which one is toxic?  The "bogey" pieces or the "lead" ones?

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #63

    Bronco70

    I bet they both taste icky

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #64

    StrategicPlay

    konhidras wrote:

    Does it even occured to anyone in this thread that a player who picked his nose before a game without washing hands started to play a game thereby touching the pieces. And the next players using the pieces afterwards are unware of what the previous player did to pieces ( i even see players subconciously bite their fingers during a game as a mannerism). Now the question is, which one is toxic?  The "bogey" pieces or the "lead" ones?

    I bet the other guy won't care. 

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #65

    TomOhio

    mldavis617 wrote:

    As a chemist, I would strongly recommend that you not heat, mold or use lead.  It is a heavy metal and very toxic.  Steel slugs can be found at hardware stores and are what manufacturers today use.  Lead is dangerous, far more so that we thought a decade ago, and is being studied for its potential link to dementia and Alzheimer's diseases.

    ... when exposed in infancy, and occupational exposures.  NOTE TO ALL WHO ARE CONSIDERING USING LEAD:  I only do this in my driveway, NOT in the house, to ensure good ventilation.  I always put down a sheet of plywood under my work area and top that with a disposable tarp, which I throw away if I spill... which I don't.  I always wear protective hand and arm gear.  I make sure I clean up thoroughly after I'm done, and NO ONE touches my burner or ladle but me.  There are never any kids around when I'm doing this... the wife is in the house but no one else is around.  I only do this for about two hours twice a year, and I keep the plugs I make in a sealed container that is locked... as are the lead chunks I bought at my local supply.  Finally... be aware of the melting point of lead.  It's almost impossible to boil it on a home unit in volumes large enough to do what we're talking about here... unless you put a near-empty ladle back on your burner.  The fumes of boiling lead can be extremely bad for you... so be aware.  Been doing this on and off for 40 years.

    Lead can be handled safely... it's not nuclear waste... but you have to use some common sense.


Back to Top

Post your reply: