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Caro-Kann Study Group (1.e4 c6)


  • 2 months ago · Quote · #121

    Ormiston313

    Hahaha....your bishop move along the long diagonal that last game cracked me up.  Good games.

  • 2 months ago · Quote · #122

    Rogue_King

    Heres a recent carokann game I had. My opponent wanted to make things boring by not really attacking, just developing. Unfortunately in the carokann that's a death sentence because positionally blacks just better, and even if you press for an attack black has better attacking chances. Here's my game with annotations.

     

  • 2 months ago · Quote · #123

    TheElementalMaster

  • 9 weeks ago · Quote · #124

    konhidras

    Does anyone has a game against the 1.e4 c6 2.f4 line? thanks

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #125

    Ormiston313

    Somewhere. I play d5 and if e5 then c5 immediately if that helps.

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #126

    TheElementalMaster

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #127

    Rogue_King

    Woah nice job taking that free queen elemental. The carokann was no match for you Wink

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #128

    konhidras

    To the OP . Thanks very much for the idea. I employed the c5 move and it worked. I got a playable middle game and even won against a village chess champion. Winning the day-long mini-match 8-3 and two draws. Lossing only 1 game out of 6 as black in the caro-kann.

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #129

    Ormiston313

    Konhidras, good for you! Have you joined the Caro-Kann Study Group yet? Please do. It's open to all. Thx

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #130

    chessarx

    Nice job Konhodras! Hopefully you can post some of those games here for the group to see.

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #131

    konhidras

    chessarx wrote:

    Nice job Konhodras! Hopefully you can post some of those games here for the group to see.

    I would love too. But every time i make a blog and post a game like the one by elemental master, i could not post it. So ive been doing it the old fashioned way document type like i do for my blogs.

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #132

    JesseVchess

    I'm in, I will catch up on reading this thread soon, going to mark it for now...

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #133

    Ormiston313

    I can help you. I worked all the bugs out and feel like something of an expert on the subject.

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #134

    konhidras

    Ormiston313 wrote:

    I can help you. I worked all the bugs out and feel like something of an expert on the subject.

    i tried re-editing one of my blogs before and when i pressed the post, boom! zap! it was gone so i settled back to the old. Thanks for the help. :)

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #135

    Ormiston313

    The main reason that happens is because after 30 minutes you lose all your work. But there's a simple fix that allows you to work for as long as you want. Simply click preview before the 30 minutes is up and then immediately click edit to save your progress. Then submit when done. Once you get the pop up saying 30 minutes has passed, you're screwed. Also you can't edit game boards... Only replace them. And.pgn notes usually won't carry over however I did figure out the trick to adding notes to a pgn. After you type the note you have to click on the next move... But not by using the arrows. If you click the Next move arrow your note gets erased.

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #136

    konhidras

    Thanks Ormiston, but still cant do it, probably my texts are too long that i reached the maximum allowed texts.

    But here it is i hope you guys dont get tired after reading. ty

     

    The Amateur Analyzes his game part2
    Hello chess.com community im here again for my game blog. As usual, no computer analysis is used in the annotiations.Just plain old me analyzing the games and sharing some insights as to what drives me to play some radical moves. And of course i included the ideas i gained from studies and books. So once again if youre a 1600 and above.... well...this might not be for you.To the rest who still want to play over this blog...thanks very much and i hope you enjoy.

    1460 vs me


    1.    e4    c6
    2.    d4    d5
    3.    e5    Na6
    It has just been  months since i took up this defense as black. From a study of Fischer's games it was always the sicilian defense for me with the najdorf as Fischer's games as reference and the schevenigen with kasparovs approach. I would study their games with these openings with black not to memorize the moves but to get along the game and understand were it leads to. The text move is known as the Kavalek variation of the Caro-kann. I took it up form FM Eric Schillers book "Complete defense to king pawn openings: Caro-kann defense" I have won lots of endgames and games with it (blitz and long both 5mins or 25 min games). My loses with it were typical blunders. It fits my tastes coz of it although cramp game there is a space for maneuvering within my territory. It is less criticized both positively and negatively thus making it all the more appealing to me. I can therefore experiment with it win or lose i dont care as long as im playing the opening im comfortable with its basically ok for me. The inspiration for the choice in the opening is from what i learned from Senior Master Buckley's book "Practical chess analysis" were he states a player to challenge the annotator. Thus this is how i came up with the Kavalek line.
    4.            c4?!
    Sometimes it pays to play on unfamiliar lines. Book move was 4.Ba6 Qa5ch 5.Nc3 Qa6. I think white is trying to approach ...c5 with the idea of giving black an isolated pawn or either he has mixed -up a panov line.
    4.            ....   Nc7
    5.            c5    Bf5
    Get em out!.. Sadly white gave up the tension in the center by closing it. So its obvious now where both sides can attack. Probably thinking that my knight is doomed at c7, white closed in on playing c5. Looking at the board it looks like white takes tha advantage, he really does . Blacks position is cramped and the only breathing space is the threat on the king wing and unless i could create some real threats ill remain cramped for the whole game. Mind you, not all amateurs like me are comfortable with this kind of position.
    6.    Nd2    e6
    7.    Ngf3    Be7
    8.    Be2    h5
    9.    O-O    h4!?
    It seemed that when i play this opening and white castles kingside without exchanging  light colored bishops with black castling long, the odds favored me. Ive had lots of experiences with this at 5min games that  certain patterns started to register in my head. There seemed to be lots of benefits in continious use of a certain opening. It looks ike famiiarization is taking place inside a players head. 9...g5 was better here then h4 then g4 with a direct attack on the king.
    10.    h3    g5
    11.    Nh2    Nh6
    12.    Bg4    Bxg4
    white is playing  for simplification here since it is well known in theory that when attacked, try to exchange pieces and simplify.
    13.    Nxg4    Nf5?
    Dangerous! having closed the attack it is just plain and simple to just exchange knights via 13..Ng4 and if 15. Qg4 then 15..Qd7 16. Nf3 0-0-0 17. Bg5 Rdg8 18.Qf4 Qd8. Although a pawn down there is still compensation of an attack (yeah right who is to see it that far ahead amateur? lol). Now it  is white if he sees it, who is going for an attack. But this sequence was so vague or shallow during the game that i wasnt sure what power my queen has at d8.
    14.    Nf3    O-O?
    Whites 14th move prepares a knight jump at f6 tempting me to play 14...kf8. The g -pawn is in trouble thus 14... since the king wing is open. 14...Rg8 was called for . A rook for two pieces plus the chance of castling long could be fatal for white. But i couldnt see through the mud when if 14..Rg8 15.nf6 check Bf6 16. ef6 Qf6 17.g4! when 17...hg3ep 18.fg3 Ng3 19.Rf2 Ne4 20. Rg2 and he defends.The remaining question in my mind then was, is my opponent willing to give away a pawn to hold?. After 14..0-0? i immediately saw that i was in deep trouble.
    15.    Bd2?    Kg7
    Whites 15th move was a lemon. If 15.Nf6ch Bf6 16. ef6 Qf6 17.Bg5 Qh8 and black is awfully placed coz white has 18.g4! f6 19gf5 fg5 which will soon open the e-file for white and leave him with a better placed knight. Sr. Master Buckley's book intructs to find our achilles heel and protect it. In this game its my f6 square. Well honestly it has always been this square in my carokann games.
    16.    Qc1    Kg6!
    The king is a fighting piece. Steinitz
    Trying to make ammends with my previous error , something has to be done. But look at the position. White can make an attack out of this one "clearing lines " All he has to do is coordinate his pieces. He could put the rooks on a battery at the file ,put the knights at the f and g files- and queen on the c diagonal and...viola!  He can make a sacrifice of either knights and  annihilate blacks position to kingdom come.
    17.    Kh2?!    Nb5
    Up until now even after analyzing this game i didnt understand the move 17.Kh2.
    18.    Bc3    a5
    Trying to win space. But looking at the position, white has three pieces attacking the g5 pawn and based from experience three pieces is enough to force a checkmate if not at least a tremendous threat. I think white has an attack here but i could not see it yet. Perhaps my annotiations after move 16 would fit that idea.
    19.    a4    Nc7
    Believe it or not  my knight sortie is just meant to take white's attention to the other wing and its primary mission  was to distract whites bishop and send it to another place to ease the tension on my g5 pawn. And there is another thing to it. I realized that the knights are the life of black position in the caro-kann.  I was impressed by how the late Tigran Petrosian use his knights in this kind of maneuver in his caro-kann games actually even in non-caro-kann games. I've seen it in the book "pertosian vs the elite " and the "life and games of tigran petrosian". I have learned from strong players that it is not enough to have good books, one must also know how to coordinate them for reference and information.I feel like writing a thesis. Back to the game.
    20.    g3?    hxg3+
    The move 20.Bd2 was still playable followed by 21.Ra3 then only 22.g3 and proceed with his breakthrough. I firmly beleive his pieces are uncoordinated and this is my chance to coordinate mine. Timing is of the essence in chess as always been said by GM Eugene Torre.
    21.    fxg3    Ne8!
    You may say its funny but i always call this kind of maneuver as "Petrosian maneuver" (although Petrosian never really played the Kavalek line ). And from time to time if given the chance to play them in a critical position i always play it or prepare to play it without hesitation. Beside its what the position require. Whites bishop is strategically placed on the queen wing , even though it should have been on the king wing to serve a more important purpose.
    22.    Qc2    Neg7
    23.    h4    Nh5
    ahhhh. just in the nick of time.. This does not only threatens to win the g3 pawn but prepares for a possible Nf4 sacrifice after the exhange of the h pawns. Return back to move 22...Neg7...isnt it obvious where its going? We amateur have this habbit of not looking ahaead or seeing our opponents plans even when its starring us in the face. I have lost lots of games with this attitude of not paying attention or totally disregaring my opponents plans.
    24.    hxg5    Bxg5
    The move 24...Nhg3 was also playable preaparing Rh8 but white can defend by playing his king to g1 and putting his queen on g2 then pkaying his queens rook on f3 via a3 later on.
    25.    Bd2?    Bxd2
    There was nothing to fear of a possible black attack on e3. The vital pawn on g3 must be protected as the white pieces are not fully coordinated yet. 25.Be1 was correct. I find it strange that my opponents seemed to be confused in a tactical melee coz if he is not then he should have seen 15. Nf6 check. Another maxim that could probably pass in Lasker's axiom: understand your opponents way of thinking.
    26.    Qxd2    Nhxg3
    27.    Kg2    Rh8!
    There is now way that i would play 27..Nf1 coz logically, it would look like white is a tempo up though an exchange down. My king is exposed and with his newly found coordinated pieces and a strong pawn on e5? Who knows what could happened to me had I taken the rook on f1 (my king is on g6 for crying out loud. lol) . Sometimes it pays not to be materialistic. Yeah ...youve guessed it right...look at the board and see whats coming.
    28.    Rg1    Ne4
    29.    Qd3    Nh4+
    30.    Kf1??    Nxf3
    Confused, my opponent now succumbs to the pressure. 30.Nh4! forces him on the edge but he can still survive and gain counter play by 31. Kf3  and place the knight at f2 after  30..Qh4.  Of course not 31.Nf6 Qh2 check 32.Kf3 Rh3 but 31.Kf3 Qh3 32. Ke2 and the game is about equal its still a long fight. With the text move the curtains falls all over the white pieces.What was once a promising game for him, swoop passed into a nightmare. It is very true that at our level (amateur) we need to work on tactics.  Now the white king need not apply for a divorce...his Queen is dead.
    31.    Qxf3    Nd2+
    32.    Ke2    Nxf3
    33.    Kxf3    Rh3+
    34.    Ke2    Qg5
    35.    Nf6    Rg3
    With a big advantage its is just right to contain the opponent and bring out the rest of the army. I find no reason to spend more time in finding brilliancy. Even the great Capablanca questions the act of searching for a brilliancy when a simple win presents itself (yup its there in the pages of Capas My Chess career).  The game is already in the bag. Practicallity.
    36.    Kf2    Qf4+
    There is no need for extreme imagination of 36...Rg1 37.Rg1 Qg1 38.Kg1 Rh8 then Rh4. Although it was a win it is still quite a long one.  In the game i was also contemplating on 36..Qe3 but a move is a move.
    37.    Ke2    Qe3+
    38.    Kf1    Rxg1#
    0-1
    I must say that although i kinda liked  an idea of a Petrosians approach and applied it to this game via piece maneuvering within ones own territory, I myself is not impressed by how i played. Had my opponent found the correct moves, the battle could have ended earlier and a win for him/her. This is another thing that i have read about ones chess style. and it came from Spassky. The great former world champion once said that he knew his weaknesses and tried to work on it. I guess i have to completely work on it else an opponent with equal strength might find them and convert it to a win. Thanks for reading. Darn ,..i still dont know how to put em boards ya know. lol.

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #137

    konhidras

    Here is another one this time against the Caro

     

     

    The analyisis of this game is based on my assesment of the game during  play and some were only added (thought very few) after the game. (So if youre a 1600 and above this blog may not be for you, but if you are a 1500 and below you might want to read through. Who knows we might be sharing the same faults and ideas.) No computer aided analysis was used so some imperfection or errors might be present in my analysis.I am presenting this game on my point of view "The Amateure's point of view". Besides, im  no expert nor a master (im not even a 1600 for crying out loud) to imply that my approach is true gospel. This is basically how i see the game during play and what themes occurred on my chess thinking as the game progress.I shall try to be as candid as i can in my annotations. It must be stated that while at play i try to maintain and apply the principles and ideas i have learned from the books i have read which has greatly influenced me as a chess amateur player.As much as possible i will try to maintain objectivity rather than self glorification to establish my ideas that im sharing. True im just between 1400-1500 but the wins against stronger rated opponents has shown me that i am improving and i shall try to continue to do so by continually reminding myself of the basic principles and ideas taught by the great masters and authors of the classical period. As a 1400 player i am bound to make mistakes like leaving a piece enprise or just simply blunderring away a piece or falling for a mating net by grabbing pawns or sacrificed materials, falling for traps and not concentrating on the basic principles in a typical endgame play . But by applying simple logic taught by the masters in various books and applying them during play was a great help like "having a plan" "creating treaths", and asking the simple question "why did he play that?" were very useful. Although sometimes i forget them at some critical points in a game thereby losing, by constantly reminding myself of it was indeed a good help as it provides strength to hold my own even against a stronger opponent. I am sharing my games as an example of the thinking strength of a typical amateur. Pardon me if my constant referals for particular books are stated for it is true that the books that will be mentioned truly molded  my play for they are my contstant guide and mentors. I never grew tired of them.
    Me vs (Name withheld) 1834
    1.    e4    c6
    Does Capa open with e4?. Sometimes during his younger years but not in his later years. The inspiration for my choice of e4 is based on Fischer's assesment "Best by test" (In his book My 60 Mem. Games)
    2.    Nf3     d5
    I have always replied Nf3 against caro or french.My theoretical knowledge of them as white is rather vauge. Thus, i felt it more to my liking to keep the opening in its simplest form rather than engaging in theoretical battle against a stonger opponent and at the same time heading Capablanca's advise in mind (capablancas last lectures book) of developing pieces just to get into a playable middle game and at the same time following Fischer's treatment of set-up against the caro-kann (fischer -petrosian game with the caro-kann in the book the games of robert james fischer) with which i also play as black.
    3.    exd5    cxd5
    4.    d4    Nc6
    5.    Bd3    Bg4
    6.    c3    e6
    7.    O-O    Nf6
    Im not really sure if the opening ends here but in the caro-kann the light colored bishop must get out of the pawn chain as did my opponent played here. Now i am in the thought of playing 8.h3. But i felt driving away the bishop by h3 then g4 would weaken my kingside too early. Worse the queens are still on the board. Capa once said that when faced with a surprise in the opening, develop your pieces as quickly as possible. Actually there is no surprise in the opening yet but the basic principle of developing my pieces entered my head and at the same time avoiding risk too early in the game so i played...
    8.    Bf4    Bd6!?
    I must admit i was surprised by this coz this bishop can be attacked by 8..Nh5 and if 9.Be5 then 9..Bf3 10.Qf3 Qg5 and if 11. g4 then 11.. Ne5 12. de5 Nf4 13. Bc2 Qe5 followed by Bd6. By playing the text move it dawned unto me that my opponent is going to castle long and head for my throat with h5 h4 Ne4 moves.
    9.    Bxd6    Qxd6
    10.    h3    Bh5
    The move 10. Nd2 develops my pieces but it gives him time too with 10..000. Suddenly i felt warm blood flowing to my head. After reading and studying Mihai Subas "dynamic chess" would it be bad not to try his approach against a stronger opponent?. I have always applied the attitude i learned from studying capas games of simplification and heading straight for an endgame (which i find more suitable against a lesser opponent). But im facing a stronger opponent, in school i once heard a chessmaster and at the same time chess team coach uttering the exact words "Avoid unclear positions but if you cannot help it at least complicate them. Lesser opponents will one way or another succumb to the complexities of the position." Yes i was not a member of that team but i  remembered those words and kept it at heart.
    11.    g4!?    Bg6
    The move 11.. Bg4 12.hg4 Ng4 was tempting. But with 12. Kg2 with ideas like Rh1 ,Qe2 followed by Nbd2, Rag1 then Kf1 eases my heart. Is g4 then bad ? I dont know. Sometimes i have a tendency to play by the gutt. I have lost and won positions like this. This is basically against capas teaching of weakening the kingside position. But im in the mood for power play and learning, and it is very rare to find an 1800 playing a 1400. Naturally the lower rated would be happy if he gets a draw. But this is an enjoyment on my part of testing the skills of my much stronger opponent. I knew at heart that my opening play is below par and my middle game just plain and simple (piece manueverings) but i have total belief in my endgame play  based on what i learned form various books that enabled me to grasp the basics ( why wouldnt one be after studying capas "chess fundamentals and "Last Lectures" and playing over his games in "Capablancas 100 best games"). I just got to have an inspiration on my belief on my end game play and i found it in Capas books.
    12.    Bxg6    hxg6
    13.    Kg2!    O-O-O!?
    In capas book "capablancas last lectures"  it was said that timing and space is of the essence. Thus i played Kg2. With my pawns too far advanced I am at my opponents mercy. I started to see his good moves like Ne4 then f5 then rh7 followed by Rdh8 after he castled. I am clearly way behind in development but intermediate moves like 13. ...Ne4 was called for then only 0-0-0 afterwards. Opportunity never knocks twice as the saying goes basic principles in chess suggests we create threaths and fight for the innitiative. thus i played...
    14.    Ng5!    Rdf8
    With his rook on defensive chore its about time to fight for the center then develop my pieces. I once read  the idea "Centralize and dont lose heart" im not sure if it was Nimzovich but it sure did stuck to my head.
    15.    f4!    Qe7
    15.Qf3 doesnt seem to be appealing to me coz it shuts down the f3 pawn. And since my pawns are already advanced might as well push 'em and support them with pieces. besides im on the defensive and f4 maintains the tension of the fight for the center. I had to coordinate my pieces. First things first. Now if black played 15...Ne4 i had 16.Qf3 Ng5 17.fg5 e5 18 Qg3 and if 18...f6 then 19.Nd2 fg5 20. Rf8 Rf8 21. Rf1 Rf1 22. Nf1 and im still ok. What is he playing for? 16..Ne4 and if 17.Ne4 de4 followed by Qh4. He failed to see my reply of f4
    16.    Qf3    Rh4!
    When i saw this i tought it was a waste of tempo but it dawned on me that he has 17...Ng4  18.hg4 Rfh8 and if 19.Rg1 Rh2 check 20.Kf1 f6 and im in deep trouble coz he wins the piece back with control of the 7th rank 6th or the e-file if i happen to sacrifice the night for a pawn. It is good that i had the move on hand which justifies the mistake on blacks 13th move.
    17.    Nd2    Rfh8?
    This gave me ample time to defend. I was expecting 17...Ng4 18.hg4 Rfh8 with the idea of giving back the night and maintaining the dynamism of the game via 19.Nh3 Rh3 20 Qh3 Rh3 with an unclear game. As Schiller wrote in his "developement of a chess master"  that we should always calculate...deeper. My development is now complete. Its time to repulse the treaths and aim for counter play. Dynamically the Suba's way.
    18.    Rh1    Nh7?
    Whats this? Is he attacking or what? 18..Ng8 was the move i was expecting followed by 19..f6. With the text move it disobeys certain principles that  "to exchange pieces when attacked"  but he is the one attacking thus this move all the more eases the attack. Im free and he just handled me the key. Now his rook on h4 looks sad as he has to waste another tempo or two for re-deployment
    19.    Nxh7    R4xh7
    20.    Rae1    Qd6
    21.    Re3!?    f6
    Overprotection? Nope. 21. Re3 prepares Rhe1 in case black rook on h8 decides to flee and if it tries to go back i have Qf2 in mind followed by h4. now with black 21...f6 black seems to be playing a rook down (rook at  h7). I would have prefered him play Re8 then Rhh8 then soon double rook on the e-file. This kind of notion i learned from Capablancas "My chess career" when he was asked how an endgame should be won. He went straight towards the winning position and said that that particular position should be targetted to get the win. It appeared to me that one should imagine the "dream" position. Set a particular goal and get it. Got it?.
    22.        Qg3        Kc7
    23.    Nf3    Re8
    24.    h4    Reh8
    Amazingly, my opponent does not see my plan. So it does pay to have a plan. It was just simple: exchange queens and head for a favourable endgame with utmost control of the e-file via doubling of rooks on the e-file. He might be preparing for  a possible  25.g5 f5 26.Ne5 Ne5 27.fe5 Qe7 28.Qf4 game squeezing which is too tough to grind. Im not sure if it was going straight to a Nimzovitchan position it just didnt fit my taste. But as capa advices: take the initiative and maintain it.
    25.    Rhe1    Re8
    26.    f5!?    gxf5?
     f5 is risky but i had to play it coz i was playing along the lines for endgame play and forgot that 26...Qg3 27Kg3  gf5 28 gf5  e5 29.df5 fe5 30. Ne5 d4! 31.cd4 Nd4 32.Rc3 Nc6 33.Nf3 Re1 34 Ne1 Rh6 35 Kg4 is still difficult for me. As a player just between 1400 and 1500 i am eager to lose in order to learn. Capas book on his last lectures taught me to take risks even to the point of losing a game coz we learn from our loses and gain experiences.Suba's "dynamic Chess strategy" showed me how to bring  life to a game.  Its funny how a sequence of moves radically changes the outcome of the game.
    27.    Qxd6+    Kxd6
    28.    gxf5    Nd8
    29.    Kg3    Rhh8
    30.    fxe6    Rxe6
    31.    Rxe6+    Nxe6
    32.    Kg4?    g6!
    Throwing away the initiative. 32. Rh1  Rh5 33Kg4 g6 34Re1 f5 check 35 Kh3 Nf4 check 36 Kg3 maintains it. Now im back to square one.It is i who wasted a tempo as his rook comes to life. He must have been relieved.
    33.    Kg3    Rh5
    34.    Nh2    Rf5
    35.    Ng4    Ke7
    36.    Nh6    Rh5?
    Having fought for freedom he suddenly went back to captivity. 36..Rf4 was the move i was anticipating and was prepared to sacrifice my rook for the knight in case the opportunity presents itself.
    37.    Ng4    Rf5
    38.    Ne3    Rh5
    39.    Ng4    Rf5
    It looks he is heading for the draw and  40 Ne3 might seal it. The move 40 Nh6 went up my head but it leads to nothing. Then suddenly i saw.
    40.    Re2!    Kf7??
    Having fought stubbornly with  extreme patience ... what a sad ending. 40..Kd6 was better then we have 41.Nf2 Nf4 42. Re8 Nh5 check. Believe you me, i am analysing this game based on what i see during the game and no computer analysis is done in this whole game annotation ( I was litterally jotting down notes as i see them during the game). Now the question is, is it possible for him to see my 44th move reply? Because even with black  the exchange down i assessed the position as still a very hard win for me. Black gets a doubled pawn but my king cant get anywhere the enemy line. And as Steinitz once said "The king is a fighting piece". Im in the endgame and experience has taught me that no matter how or what exchange up i am, without king support it is nothing.
    41.    Nh6+    Ke7
    42.    Nxf5+    gxf5
    43.    h5    Kf7
    44.    Rxe6!    Kxe6
    This kind of sacrifice i learned  from capablancas chess fundamentals. I simply imagined the board without the rook and knight and saw that it was a better clear win for me. Holding on the the  rook vs knight endgame is still a painful strugglle. Besides the knight on e6 is so strong that black can hold the game coz my king cannot get in the fortress. Lasker once said "If you see a good move, look for a better one". Im not sure if im thinking it right but i believe so coz i once played over  the Fischer-Petrosian candidates final game 7 were Fischer exchanged a very well placed piece for a weak one then simply transitioned from one advantage into another.It was not the move that inspired me to think this way also in the game but the approach to the game as a whole. From a dominant ,superior but long path winning position to a simple clear cut win.
    45.    Kf4    Kf7
    46.    Kxf5    1-0
    The ending is smooth, Im going to sack the pawn on the  f- file then push my pawn to h8 then grab the pawn on d5 then march my king towards the b and a pawns then sending my c-pawn down for promotion. You got it! Imagination.With his king on h8 he is too far to reach em.
    After the game my opponent complimented me for my play and I on my part thanked him for playing me. Something should be made clear here and that is that I never put wins like this in my head having Alekhines caution about how "vanity" destroys ones chess. The success of applying the principles and ideas learned from the masters in their books in a game is all too gratifying. It just showed me that im on the right path but still a long long way to go.Rejoicing over a win against a higher rated opponent is normal but believing youre a very strong player already is a sledgehammer that has the tendency to be boomeranged back at you. And it will hurt. But in summary it should be emphasized that if we have lots of books in our library these books must be read and lessons kept at heart. It is an investment. We have spent money in buying them why not sepnd more time in studying and reading them. Kasparov onced said "Spend time if you want to succeed". Good luck guys!.

  • 8 weeks ago · Quote · #138

    Ormiston313

    Hahaha, you might be right about the text limit. Let me tinker with it and see if I can help.


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