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The Thinking Process of a Grandmaster


  • 12 months ago · Quote · #21

    TetsuoShima

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 12 months ago · Quote · #22

    SmyslovFan

    dmvdc, do you see that what you are describing as differences in memory is a difference in thinking?

    De Groot's point about thought processes is that both amateurs and GMs calculate in similar manners. But they have different goals in mind (evaluations) and different abilities to memorize and recall key positions. 

    Those are real differences in thinking. 

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #23

    TetsuoShima

    SmyslovFan wrote:

    dvde, do you see that what you are describing as differences in memory is a difference in thinking?

    De Groot's point about thought processes is that both amateurs and GMs calculate in similar manners. But they have different goals in mind (evaluations) and different abilities to memorize and recall key positions. 

    Those are real differences in thinking. 

    but do all GMs have the same way of thinking???

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #24

    HotBoxRes

    Hierarchical thinking. Your thoughts are built upon previous learning experience. In other words: the more you play, the more efficient your chess-thinking becomes.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #25

    dmvdc

    SmyslovFan wrote:

    dmvdc, do you see that what you are describing as differences in memory is a difference in thinking?

    De Groot's point about thought processes is that both amateurs and GMs calculate in similar manners. But they have different goals in mind (evaluations) and different abilities to memorize and recall key positions. 

    Those are real differences in thinking. 

    I don't think they have different goals in mind. As to their "different abilities to memorize and recall key positions," the point is that those different abilities arise from their experience and knowledge, not from some innate ability masters possess that the rest of us lack. What we (if we're not masters, and I'm certainly not!) lack, and they do not, is precisely that experience and knowledge. So, no, I don't consider differences in memory and knowledge differences in thinking. But differences in memory and knowledge do lead to different results!

    To me, this is all the more reason to respect GMs. They're not just random people who happen to hit upon some secret thought process, allowing them to attain chess mastership. They work with the same tools we all do (barring any mental or physical handicaps, of course).

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #26

    nameno1had

    SmyslovFan wrote:

    dmvdc, do you see that what you are describing as differences in memory is a difference in thinking?

    De Groot's point about thought processes is that both amateurs and GMs calculate in similar manners. But they have different goals in mind (evaluations) and different abilities to memorize and recall key positions. 

    Those are real differences in thinking. 

    I would agree that they may ask some of the same questions, but they often come to different conclusions.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #27

    CrimsonKnight7

    I would think GM's have more of an ability at creativity skills (at least as far as chess goes anyway) than most people that try to learn later in life. That does not mean other creative geniuses can't be great at chess. I personally believe everyone thinks differently, at least to some degree in different areas. So obviously some exceptions could occur, its just unlikely unless one has all the proper mentalities (lol, not sure if that is even a word) needed.

    However learning ( or just having the ability ) the creative parts especially the older you get, the harder it becomes normally. I guess there could be exceptions, but generally it may not be possible at least for most people, or so difficult for most after a certain age, that its not worth the effort.

    I would also think that age could also vary per person. So there isn't an age per se. Its just much easier to pick things up if you are younger. As well as highly unlikely for most to reach GM status after a certain age in their life, and usually going from past GM's, that age is typically pretty young, not that there isn't a few exceptions, its just very unlikely.

    That does not mean you can't be a very good player however. And chess is a game that you can derive many hours of pleasure from. So play for the enjoyment, not to reach some title. You may reach the title, but if you enjoy it first, then you won't have any regrets, because you didn't ever receive that title. Good luck.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #28

    BlooTooth

    Wow guys I didnt even know there was a Book on GrandMaster's, thanks to everyone for their input.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #29

    SandyJames

    @sydfhd, wait for 10 years! Wink


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