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King + Rook vs King


  • 17 months ago · Quote · #1

    adamplenty

    What's the best way to win such an endgame? Could I have done this more efficiently?

    Thanks

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #2

    EricFleet

    Defintely could be improved. I drilled my kids on KR v K and KQ v K and insisted they do it at near perfection.

    If you are retreating your King, something is wrong. If you are pushing the King to the center, you are doing something wrong. Push to edge then mate is simple.

    Move 56, Why not Rf5 pushing him toward the 8th-rank instead of your pushing him up to the 1st rank?

    Move 62, play Kd4

    Move 64, play Rc4

    Please review http://www.chess.com/article/view/basic-checkmates-king-and-rook-mate

    Once you are more advanced, practice with an endgame tablebase here: http://www.k4it.de/index.php?topic=egtb&lang=en

     

    Hope that helps.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #3

    rooperi

    MUCH more efficiently.

    According to Nalimov( http://www.k4it.de/index.php?topic=egtb&lang=en ) mate in 12

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #4

    EricFleet

    I should also note that it is important to learn the basic mates efficiently. They teach good habits and how best to maximize the coordination of your pieces.

    I get very frustrated when chess teachers teach the "move the Queen a Knight's move away" technique. I feel it teaches formulas and not critical thinking. One should be able to get an elementary mate within maybe 2-3 moves of theoretical best consistently otherwise, one must continue to study it.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #5

    rooperi

    Some things to remember in R vs lone King:

    This pattern forces the opposing king to retreat, for every rank (or file) you have to achiece this pattern:

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Opposition of the kings is important, on your move:



  • 17 months ago · Quote · #6

    adamplenty

    EricFleet wrote:

    I should also note that it is important to learn the basic mates efficiently. They teach good habits and how best to maximize the coordination of your pieces.

    I get very frustrated when chess teachers teach the "move the Queen a Knight's move away" technique. I feel it teaches formulas and not critical thinking. One should be able to get an elementary mate within maybe 2-3 moves of theoretical best consistently otherwise, one must continue to study it.

    I was trying the "Knight's move" technique from a Chess Mentor course I did not that long ago (though it may have been with the Queen, not the Rook).

    NM ChessNetwork teaches a different technique.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #7

    adamplenty

    Thanks for the advice.

    This is the line suggested by the computer:

    I see Black gets into a good position much more quickly than I did.

    Am I right to continue like this?:

    Thanks


  • 17 months ago · Quote · #8

    rooperi

    adamplenty wrote:

    Thanks for the advice.

    This is the line suggested by the computer:

     

    I see Black gets into a good position much more quickly than I did.

    Am I right to continue like this?:

    No, in the last diagram:



  • 17 months ago · Quote · #9

    Estragon

    Pay attention to rooperi's last diagram there, that trick will always work to force the weaker side back towards your King (and death).

    One easy way to look at it is the Rook's file and rank.  Think of it as forming  the sides of a box for the opposing King (the edges of the board complete the box).  Your task is to keep making the box smaller.  Once you force him to the edge, just be careful not to stalemate him, when that is the case you can always lose a move with the Rook and then mate next.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #10

    varelse1

    adamplenty wrote:
    EricFleet wrote:

    I should also note that it is important to learn the basic mates efficiently. They teach good habits and how best to maximize the coordination of your pieces.

    I get very frustrated when chess teachers teach the "move the Queen a Knight's move away" technique. I feel it teaches formulas and not critical thinking. One should be able to get an elementary mate within maybe 2-3 moves of theoretical best consistently otherwise, one must continue to study it.

    I was trying the "Knight's move" technique from a Chess Mentor course I did not that long ago (though it may have been with the Queen, not the Rook).

    NM ChessNetwork teaches a different technique.


    I can tell you right now that's what your doing wrong. You are trying to figure it out for yourself, but keep being interupted trying to remember something you read in some acticle or book somewhere. . This disrupts the learning process.

    Break our your own set, and play this endgame against yourself a couple times. Just figuring it out on your own is the surest way to make sure you will understand it in & out, and never forget it.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #11

    Retrodanny

    ...and here's an online engine (crafty) for you to practice: http://www.chessvideos.tv/endgame-training/king-and-rook-checkmate.php

    refresh the page to get a new positionLaughing

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #12

    yeres30

    (Comment deleted) My comment is extraneous as rooperi already demonstrated the correct way to mate

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #13

    MatchStickKing

    Best advice for an overkill mate like this came from Silman for me - make an ever shrinking box with your rook and queen, then slowly push the king onto a side and trap him there with your rook on the 2nd/7th rank b/g file. Then move your king in for the kill.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #14

    IpswichMatt

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 17 months ago · Quote · #15

    IpswichMatt

    I agree with roi_g11's post, this is the simplest method. 

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #16

    yeres30

    Sorry roi_g11 but your "Here is that technique applied to the second position in your post" is not correct.  The correct technique is demonstrated in in comment #6 above of rooperi.

    Your 1...Rh2 2.Ke1 Kf3 is not mate next move (3.Kf1 Rh1#) but much longer than that after 3.Kd1 Ke3 4.Kc1 Kd3 5.Kb1 Kc3 6.Kh1 Kb3 7.Kb1 Rh8#

    The zugzwang technique rooperi demonstrated in Comment #6 shortens the mating process such as in the diagram below which is a Mate in 3 moves only

    ..



  • 17 months ago · Quote · #17

    Robbie960

    Whichever technique you choose, learn it by rote. Same for 2 Rooks, 2 Bishops, Q & K  etc. You should practice those until they are second nature. BTW those lessons are on this site.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #18

    Thorsten_L

    could've improved alot

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #19

    yeres30

    roi_g11 wrote:You're completely missing the point.  There are two basic techniques -- yes, the one rooperi showed is faster but also harder to learn. 

    The other technique is easier.  After your "much longer than that" line with Kd1, yes it takes a few more moves but ultimately the king has to step into opposition and you mate...that is the basic technique.  I added that line to the diagram.

    The technique that roooperi demonstrated is an integral part of basic K+R vs. K endgame. 

    It is ludicrous for one to progress from beginner without knowing that a position such as the one below is a Mate in 2.


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