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What is the most SURPRISING incident happen with you while playing OTB tourney?


  • 22 months ago · Quote · #341

    OldChessDog

    Generally, I find that the most suprising incidents when I play over the board are those few occasions when I actually win.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #342

    Abhishek2

    OldChessDog wrote:

    Generally, I find that the most suprising incidents when I play over the board are those few occasions when I actually win.

    exactly! same here

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #343

    solskytz

    <9theagle> I'm probably close to USCF 2200 level - and I can tell you, that if I met a USCF 1400 in a tourney, who was otherwise performing like a 1400 (not some underrated whiz kid), and accidentally went down a piece rather early in the game - I would never accept a draw offer from  him, but would most probably win the game - probably win nine times out of ten from such a position. 

    Not because he would make accidental blunders - although he will make quite many of them - but just because he doesn't know what to do with his pieces, in comparison to my know-how. 

    I wouldn't expect to win up a piece when playing a GM in tournament time controls, and wouldn't offer him a draw either. I would play it out though - if nothing else, then for the learning experience. 

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #344

    9thEagle

    solskytz wrote:

    I'm probably close to USCF 2200 level - and I can tell you, that if I met a USCF 1400 in a tourney, who was otherwise performing like a 1400 (not some underrated whiz kid), and accidentally went down a piece rather early in the game - I would never accept a draw offer from  him, but would most probably win the game - probably win nine times out of ten from such a position. 

    Not because he would make accidental blunders - although he will make quite many of them - but just because he doesn't know what to do with his pieces, in comparison to my know-how. 

    I wouldn't expect to win up a piece when playing a GM in tournament time controls, and wouldn't offer him a draw either. I would play it out though - if nothing else, then for the learning experience. 

    So you're agreeing with me? I would still expect to win against someone playing at a level several hundred points lower than me even if I blundered a piece. I believe the argument was that if the higher rated person offered the draw, it would not be unreasonable for the lower rated person to accept. I probably wouldn't take the draw from either end unless I was in time trouble, but I think the lower player (up a piece) would be happier with a draw than the higher player.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #345

    solskytz

    <9thEagle>

     

    Sure. A piece disadvantage (in a complex position with many pieces on the board) is totally unimportant when playing someone 500 points lower than you. 

    I suppose it begins to have some importance when the lower-rated player is at least 1900 USCF, and it probably equalizes the chances, or close to that, when the weaker player is rated about 2200 USCF. 

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #347

    solskytz

    well, clearly our opinions and experiences differ...

    I remember a game by Capablanca, where he lost a piece early on against another top 20 player. He did win in the end - but he made life very hard for that master, and it was very easy to imagine a different result. Their difference in playing strength was far from 500 elo points. 

    And I've seen too many examples of people managing to escape a piece-down game with adversaries only 150-200 points below them. 

    I think that you have chosen a particularly elusive opponent to demonstrate your piece-up winning abilities, in Carlsen. Maybe if you said Ivanchuk... or Van Vely... but I do like your attitude as expressed here, and from watching your profile, I have every reason to believe that you'll climb the elo ladder much further. 

    Should you have that situation against someone with 1800 USCF, I suppose that you would feel uncomfortable... you would have imagined a million horrible scenarios, that would be for the most part totally invisible to your opponent, who would know that 'the win is there somewhere'...

    Then you would naturally fend off his naive attempts to convert, slowly break down his conviction in winning, a couple of wrong moves would slip into his play, he will give you some active play, perhaps a pawn or two, an open line or two, an outpost... suddenly you have compensation for the piece! And the best is yet to come :-)

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #348

    Mainline_Novelty

    BetweenTheWheels wrote:
    Suvel_Karmarkar wrote:

    I had a water bottle next to be and my opponent said that i wasnt allowed to have a water bottle, it was a form of cheating??? WTH

    so we called the TD and he settled it and my opponent lost 5 min.

    I remember reading a story about Bobby Fischer accusing the Russians of helping Spassky by signaling him with different colored drinks. One color might signal, "This line has been known to favor White" while another color might signal, "He's played a novelty that has been refuted in practice." So if someone brought you the water, his accusation isn't entirely baseless.

    If his move was a novelty, how could it have been refuted in practice? lol Also, as someone else pointed out, the accusation was made by Korchnoi against Karpov.


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