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Why do Grandmasters resign?


  • 6 months ago · Quote · #21

    rooperi

    Resigning is also an ego thing, I think.

    You're saying to the world "I'm good enough to understand how he's gonna win this"

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #23

    Pippychess

    it is better manners,

    if you are down like a rook and your nakamura and youre playing carlsen then it would be an insult to carlsen taht you thinkn it would be good to play on

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #24

    Estragon

    markochessguy wrote:

    Ah yes, my recently deceased countryman had the tendency to play lost positions...Might have to do with the fact that he was overshadowed by the great Gligoric, and although being an extremely strong player himself, never quite achieved Gligoric's fame...

    RIP Matulovic and Gligoric, two national (and intenational too) chess legends who passed away in the last two years...

     

    It is an insult to chess to mention Matulovic in the same breath as the great Gligoric, who was among the world's best for nearly three decades, a prolific and respected analyst and writer, and a gentleman in every sense.

    Matulovic was scorned by his peers after several incidents where he retracted moves he had made which he saw were losing, earning him the nickname "J'adoubeovic" in the '70s.  The guy was trash.

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #25

    watcha

    I think Nakamura would realize that he is going to lose a rook and resign before doing so...

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #26

    dmn10

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 6 months ago · Quote · #27

    harryz

    karate_gym wrote:

    At the amateur level it is understandable to continue playing in so called "hopeless positions", simply because you hope the opponent will blunder away his advantage or you will find a miraculous tactic to draw the game or even win it. At the grandmaster level resignation is a sign of respect for your opponent and that you acknowledge their skill and ability to win from the current position

    thats exactly what i was about to say.

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #28

    UlyssesTheMessanger

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 6 months ago · Quote · #29

    UlyssesTheMessanger

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 6 months ago · Quote · #30

    cleocamy

    "At the amateur level it is understandable to continue playing in so called "hopeless positions", simply because you hope the opponent will blunder away his advantage or you will find a miraculous tactic to draw the game or even win it. At the grandmaster level resignation is a sign of respect for your opponent and that you acknowledge their skill and ability to win from the current position."

    On the Amatuer level another kind of respect should come into play more often, namely, respect for one's self. Resigning says "Yeah, I overlooked something and hung a piece but I'm smart enough to know when I'm licked." Not resigning says, "I'm both too dumb and too obstinate to recognize any mistake on my part and what is more, I don't care about how much acrimony and discord I create."

    The idea is that your opponent may indeed deserve to win but, in many cases, you deserve to lose and when it happens you should see that you do in the most sportsman like way possible.

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #31

    varelse1

    The answer is simple. We amateurs know very little about chess, compared to GM's. When we look at a board, we do not see things as clearly. Therefore, when we are losing, we can more easily delude ourselves. At least until the actual end appears.

    GM's do not have the luxury of such ignorance. Their vision is too sharp. They cannot fool themselves into thinking the game is salvagable, when they know they could (with colors reversed) win that same position in speedchess. Their opponents winning plan just that obvious to them.

    .


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