I Should Bottle This Attack And Sell It

I Should Bottle This Attack And Sell It

spassky
Jul 29, 2009, 12:00 AM |
21 | Strategy

I wrote an article called "Learning By Induction", the main point of which was that a player could learn chess better by playing through the games of strong players and extracting for himself the lessons contained within them (inductive reasoning) rather than someone else telling you what to do in this or that situation, resulting in your head being full of a bunch of unrelated facts all out of context, which are hard to remember and apply (deductive reasoning).  As an illustration of this, I present two new (i.e. not previously posted) games, as well as one game (previously unannotated) from an article I wrote called "There is Nothing New Under the Sun."  I would like you to examine and compare the position of the first game after 13...d5 with the position of the second game after 17...Ne7 and the position of the third game after 15...cxd6 and see if you can extract any similarities amongst the three positions, especially with regard to the Black side.

That attack came out of a sharp line in the Ruy Lopez.  The next comes from a nearly symmetrical position in the King's Indian Defense.

The next attack comes from a classical King's Indian setup.  In the article mentioned above, this game went along lines almost identical to Taimanov-Najdorf, Zurich, 1953, which was awarded the brilliancy prize in that tournament.
In all three games, what common features did you extract?  How about Black's pawn chain pointing to White's kingside?  How about the half-open f-file?   How about the transfer of pieces by Black to the kingside?  How about the removal of all three pawns in front of the White king?  How about Black's disregard for material and focus on speed and attack, trying not to play a single unnecessary move?  If you were able to learn these lessons "by induction", then you can learn a lot more on your own by playing over master game collections in books.  I would recommend Morphy and Alekhine myself.  They were both great attackers, and as we all know, attack is much easier than defense. 
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