Personal Mona Lisa of GM Klaus Bischoff

Personal Mona Lisa of GM Klaus Bischoff

Gserper
GM Gserper
Jan 16, 2011, 12:00 AM |
15 | Tactics

Klaus Bischoff is another name that is virtually unknown for most chess amateurs. Indeed, he was never close to the chess elite and his best result was probably third place in the 1980 World Junior Championship behind Kasparov and Short. Yet he is respected in professional circles and on a good day can be dangerous for any opponent. I remember that in a tournament where I scored my first GM norm and had a great performance, I was happy to make a draw with Klaus. So, when in his recent interview he mentioned his best game, I was curious to check it out.  To say that I was disappointed is a huge understatement. Yes, it was a very fine game against a very strong opponent.... But the best game he ever played?  I beg to differ!  Judge for yourself:

 

 

 

Yes, I know it is stupid to argue with a chess player about his own best game, but look at the next gem he produced:
(Just like in most of my articles I give you a chance to test your attacking skills, so the game is given as a Quiz.  Please remember that you can always replay the whole game from the first move if you click "Solution" and then "Move list".)
The position is very tense and both opponents are about to start their attack.  What should White play?
In this extremely sharp position one wrong move can spell an immediate disaster. Yet White has uncovered an amazing move that immediately decides the game!
I think the explanation for GM Bischoff's choice of his best game can be found in the same interview.  He says that his favorite chess player is Tigran Petrosian and surely the game vs. GM Sakaev is closer to the style of the great Tigran, meanwhile the game vs. Nogueiras is closer to Tal's style. Anyway, I prefer the latter as a candidate for the Chess Mona Lisa of GM Bischoff. 
By the way, the system White implemented in the last game is a pet line of Klaus Bischoff.  There he scored many nice wins with the same simple, but very powerful plan: when Black plays the Semi-Slav variation of the Queen's Gambit, he castled on the opposite side or just left his King in the center and then attacked Black's King like a maniac!  Here are two more examples of his attacks:
As you could see, my dear readers, GM Klaus Bischoff has played many really exciting games and his choice of the game he calls the game of his life can be explained either by specifics of his chess style or by his modesty!
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