If there were only 1 chess book you could reccomend what would it be ?

  • #121

    I think I'll go for The Immortal Games of Capablanca.

    Now ordered. Admins please delete this thread as it is offensive to my wallet!

    I am very excited about Capablanca though. I have been loving playing through his games recently and can't wait for the Amazon fairies to come.

  • #122

    I have Chernevs "Most Instructive Games Ever Played", solely because my dad used to own it (he doesn't play much chess either), but I thought it was a half decent book. Certainly was fun to read through at least.

  • #123
    -waller- wrote:

    I have Chernevs "Most Instructive Games Ever Played", solely because my dad used to own it (he doesn't play much chess either), but I thought it was a half decent book. Certainly was fun to read through at least.

    Yes, you can learn a lot of basic strategy from that book. The problem with Chernev is that he gives the impression that every game reduces to the conversion of a basic positional advantage to a straightforward win. He rarely gives any lines showing how the loser could have played better so you just get a one sided view of the game.

  • #124

    Hi! This is my first post to chess.com!

    I have been reading "Every Great Chess Player Was Once a Beginner" by Brian Byfield, Alan Orpin, and Alan Cracknell. My son and I have been reading this book together a little bit a time and he has really been enjoying it! He's 6 and the large text and clear pictures help. We got our copy from the library.

    -=- Boris

  • #125
    6BQ5 wrote:

    Hi! This is my first post to chess.com!

    I have been reading "Every Great Chess Player Was Once a Beginner" by Brian Byfield, Alan Orpin, and Alan Cracknell. My son and I have been reading this book together a little bit a time and he has really been enjoying it! He's 6 and the large text and clear pictures help. We got our copy from the library.

    -=- Boris

    Good to know ....something to purchase my little one when she gets a bit older

  • #126
    The book is out of print and it is very expensive to purchase. I have read somewhere on a blog that the book has been reissued with a new illustrator under the title of "Learn Chess Quick". Used copies are plentiful and cheap but I don't know if any of the text has been changed. -- Boris
  • #127

    If I there were only one chess book I could recommend, it would be David Bronstein's Zurich International Chess Tournament, 1953. Whenever I read this book, I always feel like I was there (in the tournament Zurich 1953 I mean). A strange feeling, but a real one!

  • #128
    Benedictine wrote:

    I think I'll go for The Immortal Games of Capablanca.

    Now ordered. Admins please delete this thread as it is offensive to my wallet!

    I am very excited about Capablanca though. I have been loving playing through his games recently and can't wait for the Amazon fairies to come.

    You may also like to try Golombek's Capablancas 100 best games. I have the immortal games too but Golombeks book i think is better but just the same all capa books are best (for me)

  • #129

    if only one, get Polgar's "Chess" with like 6,000 puzzles and games in it. If you can only have one. 

  • #130
    pfren wrote:

    Any book on Capa is a sure shot. Even Chernev's on his 60 best endings. Factly, it may be the sole good book Chernev ever issued.

    Oh, I'm blown away by your expertise. 

    Don't know what planet you are on now, but on Earth Chernev was a brilliant and prolific author who produced many many books, some of the best out there. I can list the ones I own but don't want to waste time justifying myself against such a ridiculous claim. 

  • #131

    Well, I ain't going to push anything down your throat. Feel free to consume whatever pulp looks good to you.

  • #132
    fianchetto123 wrote:

    if only one, get Polgar's "Chess" with like 6,000 puzzles and games in it. If you can only have one. 

    Of the 27 chess books on my shelves (have read less then .27 of them) this is still the most invaluable .

    Maybe if actually started reading more of the books in my library this would change, who can say.  Will always be one my favs tho. 

  • #133

    Personally I learned a hell of a lot about the way pieces are cooperating by reading an artistic book!

    To be more precise, Ghenrikh Kasparyan's "Domination in 2,545 Endgame Studies" masterpiece. I solved about one third of the studies in it, and somehow after that the pieces began moving more freely on the board.

  • #134

    Kasparian was a true genius, games you never would have thought could be drawn he showed the draw!  

  • #135
    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • #136

    The last book I'd recommend is a tactics book, regardless of how good it is. My favorite tactics book is the Encyclopedia of Chess Middlegames: Combinations by Informant. The problem with this and any tactics book is two-fold:

    • there will always be mistakes in books printed before the computer age
    • More importantly, you can get better tactics training online for free!

    Get a book you will use that is better than anything you can get online. For chess instruction, that's My System. For chess culture, get a great games collection such as Life and Games of Tal, Zurich 1953, Fire on Board, or Instructive Chess Masterpieces. Or, save money and get the Mammoth Book of the Worlds Greatest Chess Games. If you want to spend a some money on a great set that will last you a lifetime, get On My Great Predecessors.

  • #137

    All responses are welcome by me and others im certain ....thanks to all in advance.......

    almost over the 1700....hump

    #355

  • #138

    I started reading "Modern Ideas in Chess" and i am enjoying it.  It goes through some chess history and style of chess of different historical masters, which i enjoyed.Thanks pfren

  • #139
    AndyClifton wrote:

    Lasker had the Chess Manual; Capa had Chess Fundamentals.

    THIS!! Especially the great Capa'sLaughing

  • #140
    pfren wrote:
    ChesterGood wrote:

    I don't necessarily have one book but I would recommend one author... Bruce Pandolfini.  He has written numerous books on chess basics that I found quite helpful and it was not too high brow to understand.  He was also the chess tutor in the Movie, In search of Bobby Fisher.  I DO NOT recommend they give his book to  kindergarden students though.  Usually they are still learning their alphabet and thus have trouble reading.

    True. His books were extensively used in the former USSR. They were given to kindergartens, and kids made nice paper shuttles out of them.

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