Yusupov's series from Quality Chess

TenaciousE
Iggy82 wrote:

I guess the only way to know is to get one orange book and find out what level it is. Given that I am not a rated OTB player and my blitz rating here is usually around 1500, I am pretty sure orange books will be a good fit for me in the beginning. 

Thanks for all the info. 

One shortcut would be to buy the orange "Revision and Exam" and see how you do with the puzzles in that one.  If they are reasonably challenging, you could go back and buy book 1 of the orange series and start working your way through the series.

kindaspongey

Here is a sample exercise from the Open files and Outposts section in the first book. "... look for the best possible continuation. … write down all the necessary variations. …"

https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1048626

2Late4Work

I bought the first Yusupov book, Fundamentals 1-Build up your chess at Chessable.

I was curious and excited so I tried the first 2 chapters fast-I guess 1 hour. It`s like 55 positions with learning and test. I scored well above Pass, but it showed me that I need to slow down, it`s not easy.  It was just a test to see if it was managable to solve at high speed. 
It looks like it`s a effecive way of learning. 

 

Iggy82

Yea, I will def get at least one orange one. It seems like his training course could be very helpful. 

kindaspongey
Iggy82 wrote:
... I would rather prioritize getting books with more positional exercises than purely tactical ones.

Maybe consider Excelling at Positional Chess.

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708084438/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review402.pdf

SmyslovFan

There’s a huge myth that tactics are separate from positional chess.

 

Morphy was a fantastic positional player in open positions. He understood the essential elements of open chess and taught the world how to play such positions. Botvinnik considérés him the best teacher of open positions.

If you mean learning how to play closed positions, those are covered in Yusupov’s books. But the early books rightly focus on developing, learning basic mates and tactics, and endgames.

 

 

kindaspongey
SmyslovFan wrote:

There’s a huge myth that tactics are separate from positional chess. ...

Where is this huge myth found?

"... in this book ... we are ... asked ... to find a positional sequence. ... although there are tactical positions that don’t involve positional considerations, positional moves almost always involve taking tactics into account. So how do you differentiate between the tactical and the positional? ... The important thing is for the author to select positions that although they have tactics, positional considerations dominate. The author has done a good job of selecting puzzles that have this quality. ..."

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708093253/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review347.pdf

kindaspongey
SmyslovFan wrote:

... Yusupov’s books. ... the early books rightly focus on developing, learning basic mates and tactics, and endgames. ...

In the first orange book five of the 24 subjects are:  The value of the pieces, Centralizing the pieces, Realizing a material advantage, Open files and outposts, Weak points

In the second orange book, five of the 24 subjects are:  Pawn weaknesses, Exploiting weaknesses, The semi-open file, Outposts, Coordination of the pieces

In the third orange book, five of the 24 subjects are:  Diagonals, Realizing a material advantage 2, Positional advantages, Attacking, The passed pawn

Die_Schanze

Every orange book:

  • 2 chapters opening
  • 11 chapters tactics
  • 2 chapters calculation
  • 2 chapters strategy
  • 3 chapters positional play
  • 4 chapters endgame

Every blue book:

  • 4 chapters opening
  • 8 chapters tactics
  • 2 chapters calculation
  • 2 chapters strategy
  • 4 chapters positional play
  • 4 chapters endgame

Every green book:

  • 4 chapters opening
  • 4 chapters tactics
  • 4 chapters calculation
  • 4 chapters strategy
  • 4 chapters positional play
  • 4 chapters endgame

According to yusupov himself. (jussupow.de)

 

And as far as i remember half the positional play excercises from the first books have a tactical solution.

kindaspongey

"... in this book ... we are ... asked ... to find a positional sequence. ... although there are tactical positions that don’t involve positional considerations, positional moves almost always involve taking tactics into account. So how do you differentiate between the tactical and the positional? ... The important thing is for the author to select positions that although they have tactics, positional considerations dominate. The author has done a good job of selecting puzzles that have this quality. ..."

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708093253/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review347.pdf