Is anybody able to coach me to pass 1300 in blitz

LionVanHalen
dk-Ltd wrote:

notmtwain thanks very much for you replies and for caring to check my profile. You are right that I suddenly stopped and didn't actually had fully realized that until you pointed out (as weird as it may sound). I remember stopping for learning another game, but had also vowed to stay in touch with chess, since even though it was frustrating me, was giving me also a great amount of fun. But I didn't stayed in touch for months and forgot about it until recently where started to play few daily games and now rapid ones.

 

The "progress" you show, was with lot of work and pain and it felt like 1000 was my upper limit, which I never actually reached. I stopped doing tactics, because at that time they changed the way they were calculating the rating, turning it into celebration of pure speed, instead of accurate tactics solving. Tactics training was until then, like rapid is to actual play and they changed it to bullet. Didn't liked it and stopped. The good thing is that I kept all notes, diagrams, openings, patterns, traps, strategies and everything, so that in case of a break, I could come back pretty easily.

 

To get and idea, I will actually share some of my work. The rules of Blitz for me, or anyone like me (none):

Primary

1) Avoid blunders

Blunders are what it decides a game and additionally a game lost because of a blunder, will translate in tilt mode and many more will come (usually 3-5).

2) Play fast.

Do not lose time over positional thinking. You don't need to play the best moves. Try to not have more that 1 min difference over the opponents time.

3) Check ur opponents moves (u r not playing alone)

Always check checks, captures and threats, as also the reason behind an opponents move.

Secondary

4) Do not try to push for the win (extending 2)

Do not try to finish of fast with few moves. In order to find the moves required, you will go in time trouble and lose on time. Instead, try to win with many simple moves, played quickly. If you have created an early advantage, settle back, instead of searching for a checkmate. Play simple moves and win in endgame by promoting a pawn to queen.

Do not over attack, or push for a tactic, trap, or m8 that is just not there (at least not in 5 mins).

5) When a game is lost for your opponent, pay extra attention for unsound cheap shots (extending 3).

Your opponent has nothing to lose and you are focused on finding the final blows, feeling confident that the game is over. He will try anything, for a quick turning of the game, no matter how unsound it is and the worst part is that some times you will fall for it.

6) Before the endgame, no matter how little time you have, take a good amount of time to think of a plan.

if you have already blocked a pawn by your King, think before you capture it, because it might cost you a game winning tempo, which you could had used to promote a pawn to queen. It is already blocked, why waste a tempo, if you can win the race to promotion. If you can't win the race to promotion, then better take it before the opponent defends it.

7) In endgame always look for blunders, to avoid and take advantage of (extending 1).

If your opponent hasn't done any blunders so far, he will certainly do in endgame. Especially, if he tries to flag you.

Pregame

8) Solve simple tactics (900-1300 for 15-45 mins)

9) Become focused and alert. You need to be on the edge. You can't win playing relaxed, like you do for example when watching a movie.

 

Very good... now if you can just remember those few dozen paragraphs you can make GM?!

DaniilKalabukhov

These pieces of advice are really relative and awkward. If you are going to play too fast in the middle game you might lose material and your extra time won't help you avoid a defeat.

LionVanHalen

Yes, best tip ever... little bit slower.

burhanqerimi
nyan_cat_2700 wrote:

100 pour cent free

hello, i wouldvery much like to improve my rating to get to 1500 what do you think?

Would u care to check oout my games and analyse my weaknesses?

i also sen u a friend request.

Thanks

 

dk-Ltd
LionVanHalen wrote:
dk-Ltd wrote:

notmtwain thanks very much for you replies and for caring to check my profile. You are right that I suddenly stopped and didn't actually had fully realized that until you pointed out (as weird as it may sound). I remember stopping for learning another game, but had also vowed to stay in touch with chess, since even though it was frustrating me, was giving me also a great amount of fun. But I didn't stayed in touch for months and forgot about it until recently where started to play few daily games and now rapid ones.

 

The "progress" you show, was with lot of work and pain and it felt like 1000 was my upper limit, which I never actually reached. I stopped doing tactics, because at that time they changed the way they were calculating the rating, turning it into celebration of pure speed, instead of accurate tactics solving. Tactics training was until then, like rapid is to actual play and they changed it to bullet. Didn't liked it and stopped. The good thing is that I kept all notes, diagrams, openings, patterns, traps, strategies and everything, so that in case of a break, I could come back pretty easily.

 

To get and idea, I will actually share some of my work. The rules of Blitz for me, or anyone like me (none):

Primary

1) Avoid blunders

Blunders are what it decides a game and additionally a game lost because of a blunder, will translate in tilt mode and many more will come (usually 3-5).

2) Play fast.

Do not lose time over positional thinking. You don't need to play the best moves. Try to not have more that 1 min difference over the opponents time.

3) Check ur opponents moves (u r not playing alone)

Always check checks, captures and threats, as also the reason behind an opponents move.

Secondary

4) Do not try to push for the win (extending 2)

Do not try to finish of fast with few moves. In order to find the moves required, you will go in time trouble and lose on time. Instead, try to win with many simple moves, played quickly. If you have created an early advantage, settle back, instead of searching for a checkmate. Play simple moves and win in endgame by promoting a pawn to queen.

Do not over attack, or push for a tactic, trap, or m8 that is just not there (at least not in 5 mins).

5) When a game is lost for your opponent, pay extra attention for unsound cheap shots (extending 3).

Your opponent has nothing to lose and you are focused on finding the final blows, feeling confident that the game is over. He will try anything, for a quick turning of the game, no matter how unsound it is and the worst part is that some times you will fall for it.

6) Before the endgame, no matter how little time you have, take a good amount of time to think of a plan.

if you have already blocked a pawn by your King, think before you capture it, because it might cost you a game winning tempo, which you could had used to promote a pawn to queen. It is already blocked, why waste a tempo, if you can win the race to promotion. If you can't win the race to promotion, then better take it before the opponent defends it.

7) In endgame always look for blunders, to avoid and take advantage of (extending 1).

If your opponent hasn't done any blunders so far, he will certainly do in endgame. Especially, if he tries to flag you.

Pregame

8) Solve simple tactics (900-1300 for 15-45 mins)

9) Become focused and alert. You need to be on the edge. You can't win playing relaxed, like you do for example when watching a movie.

 

Very good... now if you can just remember those few dozen paragraphs you can make GM?!

No, but I can make it to 1200+, starting from 717, while my processing speed stays constant. Your sarcasm isn't always funny and clever. Sometimes it is, but you prefer quantity, over quality.

hikarunaku

Do puzzle rush, go over games on chessgames.com, do tactics, Study 100 end games you must know on chessable. 

Savage47

Step 1: Learn to do something slowly

Step 2: Learn to do the same thing faster. 

 

Its no coincidence that Magnus, Naka et al are great blitz players. If you don't know what you're doing in slow games, blitz games are going to be the same thing...only faster. 

You can't say "I really suck at this but maybe if I do it really fast somehow I'll magically become good" Imagine if a musician said that? Or worse an engineer? 

 

TheGreatFred

The blitz paradox: you get better at blitz by not playing blitz. At your level, if you want to get better at blitz, get better at chess first by playing lots of rapid and classical games. It will take you years to improve your game if you just play blitz, blitz kills your chess, every chess player knows that.

notmtwain
TheGreatFred wrote:

The blitz paradox: you get better at blitz by not playing blitz. At your level, if you want to get better at blitz, get better at chess first by playing lots of rapid and classical games. It will take you years to improve your game if you just play blitz, blitz kills your chess, every chess player knows that.

You have played 11,000 blitz games, 4,000 bullet games and only 138 slow games.

Why don't you follow your own advice?

Kenny-Ji

I am. I started 1 month ago, and I'm already 471 uscf peak 492. I am the leading authority on the OP 4 move checkmate, child prodigy, and future world champion. Coaching costs $60 and I use skype.