Good book on the Queen's Indian Defense.

Luriana

Hi guys, I am stocked up with books on various openings but I have never been able to find a satisfying one on the queen's indian defense, anybody got suggestions?

kindaspongey

Maybe:

Starting Out: The Queen's Indian by John Emms (2004)

https://web.archive.org/web/20140627042117/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen68.pdf

dasc1

I really like the repertoire book 'play the Queen's Indian' by Andrew Greet.  It is very wordy, and has great explanations about what is going on throughout.  It recommends the 4.g3 Ba6 5.b3 b5, which is probably not quite equal, but playable, and saves you from studying tons of theory (pros and cons).  Against 4.Nc3, it has quite a large section on the Hybrid system (4...Bb4) which is doubly useful, because you can get it from the Nimzo-Indian as well, and the book recommends the main lines there.  The book is starting to get a little bit old (2009), but you don't get a lot of Queen's Indian books these days, and this is a really good one.  Also, there is an old video by Jacob Aagaard on the Queen's Indian which is pretty good for getting started, though my main recommendation would be the Greet book.

kindaspongey

https://web.archive.org/web/20140627001410/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen121.pdf

kindaspongey

The Queen's Indian: Move by Move

https://www.everymanchess.com/downloadable/download/sample/sample_id/118/

MetalRatel

In addition to the introductory books already mentioned, there are a couple of specialist works in the last decade:

A Cutting-edge Gambit against the Queen's Indian: Hit the Nimzowitsch Variation with 6.d5! is a nice book from 2014 on an interesting gambit line that Alpha Zero played.

Beliavsky and Mikhalchisin wrote a book on the Petrosian System for Chess Stars back in 2008.

 

These are books on specific variations of the QID, but it's a large opening where you may want to go deeper in your investigations than the repertoire books in the main line variations. I think the g3 main line and the Petrosian are the two biggest threats. You can probably rely more on general middlegame understanding in the less aggressive variations. Ivan Sokolov's book on pawn structures also come to mind in discussions of some common QID middlegames.

The above books are probably most relevant for players at expert and master level, but you may find useful to understand the opening from both sides.

kindaspongey

https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/993.pdf

http://www.chess-stars.com/resources/Petrosian_Contents.pdf

https://web.archive.org/web/20140708091955/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review676.pdf

https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/9052.pdf

 

TwoMove

There is a new book from Quality chess coming soon, by the same Author who wrote their Nimzo Indian one. To be honest found the Nimzo book solid but rather unexciting. Maybe that's not a problem for a Queens Indian player though.

ThrillerFan
TwoMove wrote:

There is a new book from Quality chess coming soon, by the same Author who wrote their Nimzo Indian one. To be honest found the Nimzo book solid but rather unexciting. Maybe that's not a problem for a Queens Indian player though.

 

How would it not be?  You can't play exclusively the Queen's Indian.  You have to have a response to 3.Nc3.  You could play 3...d5 against that and play a QGD, but trying to play the Queen's Indian after 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 shows that you are completely clueless as to the whole point behind the Queen's Indian.

 

It is mostly played in conjunction with the Nimzo-Indian.  After 1.d4 Nf6 (stopping e4) 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 (threatens e4), then 3...d5 or 3...Bb4 both prevent 4.e4.  The move 3...b6 does not!  Now 4.e4 and White's significantly better!

 

The move 3.Nf3 does not threaten e4, and so Black has time for 3...b6.  After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.a3 (or 4.g3 or 4.Nc3 or 4.e3), the move 4...Bb7 continues to prevent e4 from White.

MetalRatel

@ThrillerFan I think you must be misunderstanding TwoMove's post somehow. I think the implication is that a preference towards solidity in the Nimzo-Indian is likely common with Queen's Indian players. In contrast, someone who plays the Blumenfeld Gambit as Black against 3.Nf3 may tend to play the Nimzo-Indian in a more speculative style.

TwoMove

Yes that what I meant, q.uite a few QI lines are solid , even drawish. Much prefer the Ragozin these days.

Luriana

Got my hands on Starting out the QID by John Emms and Play the QID by Andrew Greet, thanks for all your feedback, imma dive into them now