Medusa Gambit Madness 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g5

DarthMusashi

In 1987 I discovered a fascinating new gambit. I thought about the Budapest Defense (1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e5), it had occurred to me that instead of playing 2..e5
as in the Budpest, why not play 2...g5!  I had tested this gambit in blitz games
and my computer software program called Psion.  The middlegame positions

 that
occurred were "ugly". Thus I named it the "Medusa Gambit".

According to Greek Mythology, Medusa was a mortal woman who was transformed into a Gorgon. A Gorgon was a hideous creature with wings, claws
, enormous teeth and snakes for hair. Medusa was slain by Perseus, but even in death was still so frightful that it turned any onlooker into stone.

Posted with this message is my game against Eric Schiller, the author of many
chess books including Unorthodox Chess Openings and Gambit Chess Openings.

Best Regards
DarthMusashi

DarthMusashi
DarthMusashi
National Master Jack Young, who used to write a column for Chess Horizons,
also experimented with the Medusa Gambit. He had theorized that the Medusa
was an accelarated form of the Vulture 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 Ne4.
DarthMusashi
My friend Jerry Flowers (who is at least master strength) also tried the
Medusa Gambit in a test game against a chess program.
DarthMusashi
In this game Blacks sacs the R at a8 and wins with the kingside attack.
DarthMusashi

For those interested in this fascinating gambit please see my article at Chessville
at the link listed below. This is from my column at Chessville called "The Search
for Dragons and Mythical Chess Openings".

http://www.chessville.com/UCO/CN/MedusaGambit.htm


Best Regards
DarthMusashi

DarthMusashi

Listed below are 2 more recent games with the Medusa Gambit.

Best Regards
DarthMusashi

DarthMusashi
panafricain

Funny and interesting as a surprise weapon. I will have look at the lines. Thx for the entertaining games :-)

DarthMusashi

You are most definitely welcome. But you would also have to learn the declined
lines because sometimes White does not capture the pawn at g5. See my
article on the Medusa Gambit at Chessville in my column called "The Search
for Dragons & Mythical Chess Openings.

Best Regards
Darthmusashi

Velinas

Great opening. Definitely trying that. You're the best, Clyde ^^ Perfect articles. I'm now totally a fan of UCOs.

ChessisGood

Actually, it looks pretty interesting. However, as White, do you really have to take it?

JamesColeman

You'd be pretty mad not to. Almost as mad as you'd have to be to play it for Black in the first place :)

pfren

Come on, this is at best ridiculous.

After 3.Bxg5 Ne4 4.Bf4 c5 5.Qc2 Black is a pawn down for absolutely nothing.

In your #5, the simple 9.f3 Nxd2 10.Bxd2 Qc7 11.e4 leaves white with a totally winning position (two pawns up, plus total central domination)- Black could not be in a worse shape...

melvinbluestone

Reluctant as I am to admit it, I have to agree with pfren. When I see moves like 4.Bd2 (#7) and 5.Nd2 (#5), I get the feeling the issue is being forced.

Wouter_Remmerswaal
pfren wrote:

Come on, this is at best ridiculous.

After 3.Bxg5 Ne4 4.Bf4 c5 5.Qc2 Black is a pawn down for absolutely nothing.

In your #5, the simple 9.f3 Nxd2 10.Bxd2 Qc7 11.e4 leaves white with a totally winning position (two pawns up, plus total central domination)- Black could not be in a worse shape...

Sure black can be in worse shape :D.

pfren
Wouter_Remmerswaal wrote:

Sure black can be in worse shape :D.

But he does have to try very hard to be routed so badly, so quickly... Tongue Out

melvinbluestone

Of course, playing against this is another story..... I tried declining the gambit with the optimistic 3.d5!? in a quick game. Observe:

GreenCastleBlock
pfren wrote:

Come on, this is at best ridiculous.

After 3.Bxg5 Ne4 4.Bf4 c5 5.Qc2 Black is a pawn down for absolutely nothing.

In your #5, the simple 9.f3 Nxd2 10.Bxd2 Qc7 11.e4 leaves white with a totally winning position (two pawns up, plus total central domination)- Black could not be in a worse shape...

That line is pretty convincing, and no fun for Black provided White knows not to go for the rook on a8.  Still the idea of this gambit to give up a flank pawn and acclerate Black's Grob-like attack with ..Ne4 ..c5 ..Qa5/b6 ..Bg7 is pretty interesting, and definitely worth knowing about.  The tactics are very similiar to what White is trying to do after 1.g4 d5 2.Bg2.

Also, if after the declined line 3.Nc3 Black has nothing better to do than 3...h6, you'd have to be a pretty devoted Grobist to believe in Black's position after 4.e4.  I'd just play Bd3, Nge2, O-O and try to take Black to town on the kingside.  I considered 3...d5 (Grunfeld-like) but on 4.Bxg5 Black's position is very bad.

3.d5 I don't like because it is very committal, weakens the long square diagonal, after 3...c5 the ..c5,d5 moves being thrown in helps Black's scheme.

pfren

1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 is simply a bad bluff (2...Bxg4 3.c4 c6 4.Qb3 Nf6 5.Qxb7 Nbd7 and white is much worse) so expecting this stuff to work sort-of in reverse would be too much).