Scandinavian Defense

SeniorPatzer

I haven't read it but GM Smerdon has a book on the Scandinavian Defense.

 

brink2017

I like 3...Qd8, but having played it often I do feel it is a bit too rope a dope. I have tried playing 2...Nf6 but I'm not by nature an aggressive enough player to do well with it. To me 3...Qd6 is the best Scandinavian, it's solid and practical without going overboard like 3...Qd8 does, it mixes things up some without going overboard like 2...Nf6 does. The Safest Scandinavian by Vassilios Kotronias is a book written in repertoire form, the best book hands down on 3...Qd6. He also covers 3 Nf3. 

brink2017
SeniorPatzer wrote:

I haven't read it but GM Smerdon has a book on the Scandinavian Defense.

 

His book is a repertoire on 2...Nf6. A great book but not a good fit for me. 

Morphys-Revenge

Failmove wrote:

Hey there,

I find very annoying some King Pawn openings (Specifically the Ruy Lopez, the King Gambit and some lines of the Italian) so I would like to leave the 2...e5 defense (what have always played) and replace it with another defense more kindred to my style.

 

I've been inquiring into all possible defenses against the king's pawn, and only three passed the first tilter:

-The modern defense/Pirc Defense

-The Alekhine defense

-The Scandinavian defense

 

Then, for the complexity of ideas for both sides that have the Modern and the Alekhine defenses, I concluded that maybe they are too much for my level. So I have to choose the Scandinavian by descard.

 

The other possible defenses have a insane amount of theory, or they lead to mid games that I don't like, or have developmental problems, or, what is worse: a mixture of several of this points.

 

I like the Scandinavian for the following reasons:

  1. -There's no efficient way to refuse the main line (2 exd5), so the white is oblied to enter my game.
  2. -After 2...Qxd5 there is no way for white to force transpositions.
  3. -The 3...Qa5, 3...Qd6 and 3...Qd8 can be played seriously and have been played at the highest level with good results. (Carlsen, Nakamura, Anand, Tiviakov and some others have played these lines.)
  4. -It gives rise to very creative mid games.
  5. -It's ok for me to let the white have some space advantage in the queen's side in exchange of a simple developement and a pawn structure withouth weaknesses.
  6. -At more personal level, the idea of winning with a supposedly doubtful opening seems very funny to me. I love the feeling of "I'm winning you with something you did not dare to play because someone told you that it was not good, and you believed him." In fact, i play the King's gambit for the same reason and I really love it.

 

So these are my conclusions and now I would like to now your opinion:

¿Have I chose correctly? ¿I was wrong in any of my assessments?

 

Thanks from advance

The scandi is great for all the reasons you. I prefer the 2.----Nf6 lines personally and have done quite well indeed.

 

The only downside to the scandi is it does not have some of the positional complexities to fall back on, so if you are playing a lower rated opponent it can sometimes be hard to fall back on positional themes.

 

However most players under about 1700 totally stink at endgame play and that is where you can take them out.

brink2017

Morphys-Revenge, with that handle choice I would expect 2...Nf6 to be your best Scandinavian. happy.png

Gozu
dannyhume wrote:
I tried playing the Scandinavian 3...Qa5 a couple years ago for a lot of the same reasons. I ended up being able to play 3...Qa5 in a whopping 3 out of 11 OTB games against other U1400 players. It was annoying as heckfar. Several times the daggone opponent would sit there debating to himself whether to take on e4 on move 2 or whether to play Nc3 on move 3. I knew that — every single fudging time— when they thought about it for more than 20 seconds that they would play some dipship move that I wasn’t good enough to refute outright, because they were too scared that I would crush them with a spectacular miniature using my stupid dope book moves. The games were interesting in retrospect, I guess. Sorry for the gratuitous language. That is not who I am nor who I aspire to be.

Haha

Failmove

I'm very happy with this defense. I've been playing 3...Qd6 and 3...Qd8 Scandi and my results are much better than with 1e4 e5. 

 

Sred
TomasThrainsson wrote:

 

ThrillerFan wrote:

 

Well, yes and no!

 

1...e5, 1...e6, 1...c5, and 1...c6 are all considered more sound than the other 16 legal moves, which range from slightly worse than the big 4 (i.e. 1...d6) to outright bad (i.e. 1...h5).

 

The problem with your logic is that not everyone has to follow the "main line" to get a great game as White.  Yes, White doesn't have much of a choice aside from 2.exd5, but after 2...Qxd5, White is under no obligation to play 3.Nc3 in order to get an advantage.  In face, I don't play 3.Nc3.  I play 3.Nf3!  There is a lot of theory in the 3.Nf3 line that is completely different than 3.Nc3.

 

Another option is 3.d4, though that line is not as strong.

 

Nf3 is easily refuted by playing Bg4 right away, pinning the knight to the queen. Of course there's theory involved there like everywhere else. I'm an avid Scandi player and have yet to meet a stronger 3rd move than Nc3, to which I prefer the Qd8 line. Still it holds true that every opening is refuted by default if you play it badly enough

 

Bg4 is certainly no "refutation" of Nf3. Black needs to learn theory here, specifically when it comes to

and with correct play White will not be worse (which the term "refutation" implied). Actually White may get quite a dangerous initiative on the Queen side.

Morphys-Revenge
brink2017 wrote:

Morphys-Revenge, with that handle choice I would expect 2...Nf6 to be your best Scandinavian.

My kill rate with black is 57% 😎

If my opponent whimps out and pushes the e-pawn rather than capturing on d5- it pops up to 65% 🤩🤩

brink2017
Sred wrote: Bg4 is certainly no "refutation" of Nf3. Black needs to learn theory here, specifically when it comes to and with correct play White will not be worse (which the term "refutation" implied). Actually White may get quite a dangerous initiative on the Queen side.

 

Sred, in your diagram yes that is an unpleasant setup for black to face in 2...Qxd5 3 Nf3. However, unless I'm somehow mistaken, it seems to me black can choose to dodge that specific line and transpose it into lines from Smerdon's Scandinavian (2...Nf6) by playing ... Nf6 early on instead of ...0-0-0. For example, After 1 e4 d5 2 exd5 Qxd5 3 Nf3 Bg4 4 Be2 Nf6 5 d4 Nc6 6 c4 Qf5 7 Be3 (the same setup for white as in your diagram, and black is also the same except ...Nf6 has been played instead of ...0-0-0) Smerdon gives 7...e5! and moves involving 8 d5, 8 dxe5. In the 8 dxe5 lines there is a line he gives in which black ends up a pawn down but Smerdon says Black has excellent compensation for the pawn.