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The change to 1.d4, should a 1550 do it ?

  • #41

    Well, maybe not the Bird! Otherwise I agree completely.  What opening to play is one of the least important decisions you will ever make 

  • #42

    I like the other answers better, but my dumb answer is just that it's foolish to decide your first move based on what your rating is.

    If you have seen a great game with 1. d4 and want to try it, then try it

    If you have studied 1. d4 recently and want to practice it, then practice it

    If you have a big tournament soon that you really want to do your best and you know 1. e4 better, then maybe work on that a little more and use it

    It is all up to you.  There is no super-parent there to guide you so sometimes you have to be your own parent!  For example, some people are orphans, or their parents do not play chess very much, or they have never bothered to pay money regularly to a chess master for guidance; so at that point you get to just make it up on your own! The great thing about chess is that nobody dies, only chess pieces getting captured, but usually even the chess pieces are not destroyed.  So if you are worried about making decisions in your life, and want to start making more decisions on your own, then chess is a great place to start. 

     

  • #43

    go play d4. realize the grass isn't greener then come back to e4

  • #44
    dfgh123 escreveu:

    go play d4. realize the grass isn't greener then come back to e4

    I'm starting to play d4 and losing a lot but I think I get active positions. Let's see how it gets. 

  • #45
    Lawkeito wrote:

    ... In the QGD and Slav you can attack with white whistle having the positional advantage, I guess. ...

    I have never been able to get much of a positional advantage with white whistle, but it does seem to annoy my opponents.

  • #46

    kindaspongey escreveu:

    Lawkeito wrote:

    ... In the QGD and Slav you can attack with white whistle having the positional advantage, I guess. ...

    I have never been able to get much of a positional advantage with white whistle, but it does seem to annoy my opponents.

    good one hahaha
  • #47

    To be honest, I don't think that the fact that you don't know how to play against certain openings justifies such switch. The choice of e4 over d4 should be based more on a playing style - i.e. what sort of positions you feel comfortable - whether you are more tactical/attacking player or technical/endgame one. I also switched to d4 because of exactly the same reasons as you are giving, although I was already around 1850 FIDE at that point, and now, at 2126 FIDE I'm switching back to e4, because I simply don't handle the positions after d4 well. So already for a long time I'm getting poorer results with white than with black (talking about OTB chess), despite the fact that I spend more time as white for opening preparation. Therefore before deciding to switch to d4, you should evaluate whether it fits your playing style. In the end, there is plenty of ways how to handle French and Caro-Kann without preventing them being played. I play French defense already for 15 years and still find it very hard to play against properly executed exchange variation with speedy c4. Same would go for many Caro-Kann players I think.

  • #48
    vit_rosenbaum escreveu:

    To be honest, I don't think that the fact that you don't know how to play against certain openings justifies such switch. The choice of e4 over d4 should be based more on a playing style - i.e. what sort of positions you feel comfortable - whether you are more tactical/attacking player or technical/endgame one. I also switched to d4 because of exactly the same reasons as you are giving, although I was already around 1850 FIDE at that point, and now, at 2126 FIDE I'm switching back to e4, because I simply don't handle the positions after d4 well. So already for a long time I'm getting poorer results with white than with black (talking about OTB chess), despite the fact that I spend more time as white for opening preparation. Therefore before deciding to switch to d4, you should evaluate whether it fits your playing style. In the end, there is plenty of ways how to handle French and Caro-Kann without preventing them being played. I play French defense already for 15 years and still find it very hard to play against properly executed exchange variation with speedy c4. Same would go for many Caro-Kann players I think.

    This is a decision that's very hard to make, because at my level we actually don't know what positions we handle better, I'm really in a deep sea right now.

  • #49

    David Gerrold once said that one should resolve a difficult decision by flipping a coin - if you don't like the coin's choice, then do the other thing. To me, both choices seem plausible, so it may be that it is just a matter of how you feel about it. For what it is worth, Queen's Gambit repertoire books seem to be longer than 1 e4 repertoire books.

  • #50
    kindaspongey wrote:

    David Gerrold once said that one should resolve a difficult decision by flipping a coin - if you don't like the coin's choice, then do the other thing. To me, both choices seem plausible, so it may be that it is just a matter of how you feel about it. For what it is worth, Queen's Gambit repertoire books seem to be longer than 1 e4 repertoire books.

    If I remember correctly, the St Louis Chess Club did a series on the top 10 most popular openings (based on their copy of the Mega and Correspondence Databases).  Queen's Gambit was in the top 2-3 with something like 10-20% of all games.  It should not surprise anyone that books on the Queen's Gambit are much longer than books on just about any other opening.

  • #51

    For awhile, there seemed to be a 1 e4 series by Parimarjan Negi, but I wonder if the project has been abandoned. One of the books was 1.e4 vs. The French, Caro-Kann & Philidor.
    http://www.jeremysilman.com/shop/pc/1-e4-vs-The-French-Caro-Kann-Philidor-76p3875.htm
    http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/ebooks/GMRep-1e4-vol1-excerpt.pdf

    Perhaps relatively short 1 e4 repertoires are more commonly published because, in part, beginners are commonly advised to use 1 e4.

    My First Chess Opening Repertoire for White
    https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/9033.pdf

  • #52

    https://www.chess.com/live/game/2383074672?username=lawkeito

     

    Look at this games you played... you waste 2 tempo ( while black is a PIECE AHEAD in development ) with a3 and h3.... those are STUPID moves. You stop an imaginary attack? Even if the bishop attacks, you WANT to give knight for bishop, so let him trade.'

    Move 7-> you attacked his queen with no reason, just to attack something....

    move 8-> you allowed him to give knight for bishop, giving him the BISHOP PAIR

    move 9-> c4... you weakened your pawn structure, create a HOLE on d4 just to attack a knight... for no reason....

     

    So, let's review:

    - you waste tempo with STUPID moves like a3 and h3

    - you attack with no reason and without obtaining anything

    - you weaken your pawn structure for no reason, just to attack a knight and obtain NOTHING

     

    You have a lot of work before "e4 or d4" question... right now you don't play anything.

  • #53

    Every time one plays a game, one has to deal with the question of the first move. When considering a switch, it might make sense to consider whether or not there is a realisticc expectation of having less of an "uncomfortable" feeling.

  • #54

    Looking at a lot of the comments here, they err on the side of caution. You'll never learn unless you try, so switch to 1.d4, learn a lot of openings against black defences, decide which you like (and that will take at least a year, I should think) and then play them for a year or two and see what happens. At the very least, you'll gain great experience, which the ones who are too cautious wouldn't gain. And don't listen to those who say that which opening you play doesn't matter, whatever their rating happens to be. At worst, it's only three years, during which you will become a far more complete chess player.

  • #55
    Optimissed wrote:

    Looking at a lot of the comments here, they err on the side of caution. You'll never learn unless you try, so switch to 1.d4, learn a lot of openings against black defences, decide which you like (and that will take at least a year, I should think) and then play them for a year or two and see what happens. At the very least, you'll gain great experience, which the ones who are too cautious wouldn't gain. And don't listen to those who say that which opening you play doesn't matter, whatever their rating happens to be. At worst, it's only three years, during which you will become a far more complete chess player.

     

    Are you suggesting to prepare for a year before switching to d4? I would say that is a very cautious approach. There will always be holes in your opening knowledge, so if your too cautious and think switching requires a lot of preparation you might create hurdles for yourself that don't need to be there. I would recommend to maybe learn the first moves and names of the most common openings and maybe learn some key ideas, but that's it. That should take less than a day, maybe a couple of hours depending on how much time you want to spend, but even that might not be necessary.

  • #56

    No. Never mind: go back to sleep.

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