Forums

Chess is hard to learn and master

CatlovR1572

Chess is one of those games that are hard to learn and master. Tip: if you come onto Chess.com daily then you would learn much quicker. Use the lessons and learn the coordinates and strategies and then you will be coming on the path to mastery!!!!!! You will soon be a bp.png, then a br.png, then a, bn.png,then a bb.png, then a bq.png and soon enough you will be a bk.png!!!!!!!!!!!

IMBacon

Chess is easy to learn.  It is impossible to master,

CatlovR1572

Well, you need to memorise what you have to do then you have to do it and for some kids that's hard.

CatlovR1572

And also, you can master it. One of my old primary school teachers did. Thats where I found Chess.com but I never used it.

 

RookAttack18

Great points, guys.

Laskersnephew

The thing that's tough about chess is that forty fie moves can be undone with one blunder. Very few other games are so unforgiving. So even as you improve, you will have occasional disasters that can be very discouraging. To get good at chess, you have to have the ability to pick yourself up every time you get knocked down. 

brianchesscake
Laskersnephew wrote:

The thing that's tough about chess is that forty fie moves can be undone with one blunder. Very few other games are so unforgiving.

False. In most games and sports I can think of, a player or a team can undo all their hard work of doing everything right for 30 minutes by doing something wrong for 1 minute. For example, in soccer/football, both teams can be playing well until one side makes a mistake (and the opppsing team capitalizes on that to score). After that, the losing team is chasing the game trying to make a goal, but will not be able to unless the other team also makes a mistake (with sloppy defending, allowing the opposition to launch a counter-attack, etc.) later on.

Chess is more similar to tennis (apart from the nature of both being turn-based games), in that not every point is "worth" the same (i.e. you have to raise your level of play when it counts the most). Scoring in tennis is structured such that a player can play perfectly for most of the contest, but if the opponent converts the majority of the game points, set points, and finally the match point, they will win the whole thing. I would say that mirrors the idea in chess of inaccuracies / blunders, such that a chess player not only wants to make less mistakes than the opponent, but also make mistakes of lower magnitude (for example, blundering a bishop vs. blundering a queen).

tygxc

Easy to learn, hard to master.

Laskersnephew

"False. In most games and sports I can think of, a player or a team can undo all their hard work of doing everything right for 30 minutes by doing something wrong for 1 minute."

Think again! In soccer, if you're up 9-0 with a minute left, you can kick in 3 "own goals" and still win comfortably. In basketball, if you're 20 points up with 7 seconds on the clock, one mistake, or even a bunch of mistakes won't change the outcome. In American football, if you're leading 55-7 with 48 seconds left and your quarterback throws an interception that's returned for a touchdown, it makes no difference. In chess, if you're a queen, two knights, and three pawns ahead and threatening mate in two, but you make one mistake, You can be checkmated on the spot

kingattacker3

Hard to learn enough to win more games 

B1ZMARK
CatlovR1572 wrote:

And also, you can master it. One of my old primary school teachers did. Thats where I found Chess.com but I never used it.

One of your primary school teachers is a fide master? X to doubt

B1ZMARK
brianchesscake wrote:
Laskersnephew wrote:

The thing that's tough about chess is that forty fie moves can be undone with one blunder. Very few other games are so unforgiving.

False. In most games and sports I can think of, a player or a team can undo all their hard work of doing everything right for 30 minutes by doing something wrong for 1 minute. For example, in soccer/football, both teams can be playing well until one side makes a mistake (and the opppsing team capitalizes on that to score). After that, the losing team is chasing the game trying to make a goal, but will not be able to unless the other team also makes a mistake (with sloppy defending, allowing the opposition to launch a counter-attack, etc.) later on.

Chess is more similar to tennis (apart from the nature of both being turn-based games), in that not every point is "worth" the same (i.e. you have to raise your level of play when it counts the most). Scoring in tennis is structured such that a player can play perfectly for most of the contest, but if the opponent converts the majority of the game points, set points, and finally the match point, they will win the whole thing. I would say that mirrors the idea in chess of inaccuracies / blunders, such that a chess player not only wants to make less mistakes than the opponent, but also make mistakes of lower magnitude (for example, blundering a bishop vs. blundering a queen).

Was watching the euro cup. France v Hungary. France had about a billion chances to score but missed them all. But right at halftime Hungary made a break for it and scored a goal. Lmao

i don’t know the result of the match though

ponz111

easy to learn takes time to master.

rehcsif026

Chess holds its master in its own bonds, shackling the mind and brain so that the inner freedom of the very strongest must suffer. Albert Einstein

jpaul_lyons

It's easy to get a whole lot of enjoyment.  Yet... It's shocking how easily chess can awaken very strong egotistical tendencies. One want's very badly to kill everyone on the board; one wants constantly a higher rating, thirsts terribly for the rating points, as badly as a vampire thirsts for blood; losing, one rages, and curses the opponent, spitting all manner of profanity at the screen. And then one begins to train, sometimes even to train very hard to the point of torture for these goals.  And yet, chess can be enormously enjoyable in all dimensions without any ambition at all.  Even the fight, just for the sake of the fight is quite thrilling, like a good street fight, after which you get up and laugh.  Even approaching the daily games like traditional cc approximates scientific research, or even very relaxing meditation over the large-scale war, during which you can discover the truth or create brilliant attacks and defenses.  The game is a very interesting phenomenon, and I haven't ever seen anything else like it.

Someone asked, "If we became friends with extraterrestrials would they be interested in chess?" I think if they were like us, but having an older and more advanced technological culture, they surely would have something much like chess, already, and probably without the raging chaos of the reptilian limbic system.  Neil Degrasse Tyson thinks if they are biologically (genetically) more advanced then chess might be to them as tic-tac-toe is to us.  What will their game look like, then?  Maybe they're playing chess with planetary civilizations. . . maybe they've figured out that the universe is a kind of giant chessboard. Then we wouldn't be so wrong to say life is surely just a game.

IMBacon

At 58 chess study for me is just mental exercise.  Just like going to the gym.  Im not expecting to have the body of someone 20-30-40 years younger than me.  I do both activities to stay young, limber, and healthy.