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Studying through youtube

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Im_a_Crow

I think using PDF is much easier if you have a tablet. You can use the analysis board and PDF reader at the same time. Reading from a physical book makes it a little harder because you have to switch your attention more frequently.

Im_a_Crow

#17 I am not sure but I think you are missing the point maybe. He wants to say that he would like to study using PDF and youtube. He is not saying that he would do multi tasking by watching youtube videos and studying books at the same time.

jennjollygreen
Im_a_Crow wrote:

#17 I am not sure but I think you are missing the point maybe. He wants to say that he would like to study using PDF and youtube. He is not saying that he would do multi tasking by watching youtube videos and studying books at the same time.

I ignored the first comment. None of the sentences they formed were coherent English. (That's ok; it seems like it's not their first language).

jennjollygreen
Im_a_Crow wrote:

I think using PDF is much easier if you have a tablet. You can use the analysis board and PDF reader at the same time. Reading from a physical book makes it a little harder because you have to switch your attention more frequently.

Last time I had two windows open on my computer so half of the screen is the book and half is the analysis board. A physical book is probably better with a real chessboard, though.

isekai_farm
jennjollygreen wrote:
Was watching some masters play through elo speedruns yesterday. Played a match with game review estimating 850 elo ( I learned what castling was this week. I'm very new at chess). Obviously still not playing "well", but I felt really in "the zone". Just saying that youtube seems to be great way to pick up on things passively (great for me as a working adult newbie).

I learnt everything I know from YouTubers, and also experience but the YouTubers made a huge part of my chess knowledge like the likes of Daniel Naroditsky and ChessBrah, I got to know a lot so I agree that youtube is a very good learning source only if you know how to maximize it's utility

Kaeldorn

Right, evidences is what you need. If this is how you date, your romantic life must be so funny.

Common sense says it: some things remain engraved in the permanent memory, and others don't. And common sense says also: figure out. It's not like we've got time or a long enough life so we can wait for science to perform the breakthrough you think you need, but actually need not.

Anyhow, I'm out of this thread, good luck on your desert island.

RussBell
jennjollygreen wrote:
RussBell wrote:

Just realized I'm starting with the wrong book according to your list! Thank you for the reminder!

Yes. For the beginner-novice I recommend studying the games of Paul Morphy in Frisco Del Rosario's highly instructive "A First Book of Morphy" as a first games collection book prior to studying Irving Chernev's "Logical Chess Move by Move". While both books are excellent introductory games collections, the vast majority of Morphy's games begin with 1.e4, and each game was selected to illustrate a specific fundamental chess principle or set of principles; it is thus advisable to become exposed to these important principles in practice as soon as possible. Having learned the lessons in Del Rosario's book you will then be well prepared to follow up with Chernev's (also very instructive) book. Note that I briefly comment on both books further on in my article (search 'morphy' and 'logical').

To avoid initial confusion when starting out in the Morphy book, note that when a capture is made (e.g., exd5), Del Rosario omits the "x" as superfluous, and simply employs an abbreviated notation, "ed5" or even "ed", when there is no ambiguity in the matter, While the use of this abbreviated notation is uncommon in chess literature, it occasionally, if rarely, occurs and should not cause any confusion once you (quickly!) get used to it. So don't let that put you off.

Paul Morphy's most famous game...the "Opera Game"...

(it's in Del Rosario's book, p.30)

https://www.chess.com/terms/opera-game-chess

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opera_Game

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-2FpiEzeYI

jennjollygreen
RussBell wrote:
jennjollygreen wrote:
RussBell wrote:

Just realized I'm starting with the wrong book according to your list! Thank you for the reminder!

Yes. For the beginner-novice I recommend studying the games of Paul Morphy in Frisco Del Rosario's highly instructive "A First Book of Morphy" as a first games collection book prior to studying Irving Chernev's "Logical Chess Move by Move". While both books are excellent introductory games collections, the vast majority of Morphy's games begin with 1.e4, and each game was selected to illustrate a specific fundamental chess principle or set of principles; it is thus advisable to become exposed to these important principles in practice as soon as possible. Having learned the lessons in Del Rosario's book you will then be well prepared to follow up with Chernev's (also very instructive) book. Note that I briefly comment on both books further on in my article (search 'morphy' and 'logical').

To avoid initial confusion when starting out in the Morphy book, note that when a capture is made (e.g., exd5), Del Rosario omits the "x" as superfluous, and simply employs an abbreviated notation, "ed5" or even "ed", when there is no ambiguity in the matter, While the use of this abbreviated notation is uncommon in chess literature, it occasionally, if rarely, occurs and should not cause any confusion once you (quickly!) get used to it. So don't let that put you off.

Paul Morphy's most famous game...the "Opera Game"...

(it's in Del Rosario's book, p.30)

https://www.chess.com/terms/opera-game-chess

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opera_Game

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-2FpiEzeYI

You're a legend. Thank you!

jennjollygreen
Kaeldorn wrote:

Right, evidences is what you need. If this is how you date, your romantic life must be so funny.

Common sense says it: some things remain engraved in the permanent memory, and others don't. And common sense says also: figure out. It's not like we've got time or a long enough life so we can wait for science to perform the breakthrough you think you need, but actually need not.

Anyhow, I'm out of this thread, good luck on your desert island.

Not you getting triggered because someone prefers to use e-books. None of this is that deep

jennjollygreen
Fizzleputts wrote:

It is commonly known that when someone watches a video it's more of a passive learning experience when compared to reading a chess book with chess notation over a real board because you are actively participating in the endevour. I suppose one can use an ebook in the same fashion, however, it is also commonly known that 2d chess and 3dchess gets stored differently in the brain, therefore it's a different learning experience, than thus, if one only plays online chess, their OTB rating will suffer.

This is what Kaeldorn meant by common sense. It's not science that backs up these claims, it's years of people reporting that, they don't do as well when they only play online chess, etc.

I hear that, but I am not comparing watching YouTube videos to playing chess with a chess book OTB. That would be a very dumb comparison.

I am comparing reading an e-book and performing analysis with annotation of the games to playing OTB. I don't play OTB at all and I've only been learning for a week, so that's irrelevant. I don't intend to join any irl chess clubs anytime soon; so my OTB rating doesn't mean anything.

I am also comparing watching youtube videos about chess to doing nothing. Both are passive, but one is beneficial for chess education at some level.

Nobody here was ever claiming that watching YouTube videos is in any way comparable to playing and studying chess.

I made this post to say that watching YouTube is helpful, and when your brain is full/ tired after studying/ analyzing your games, you can still learn while watching YouTube videos.

The argument that Kaeldorn is refuting is nonsensical and not what I said at all. And then he tried to insult me for an argument that I didn't make, which I think is pretty rude.

If it's not clear, my plan thus far has been ebook reading while annotating the games using the chess.com analysis engine, and watching youtube in my downtime or when I don't have energy for that. I don't think that's unreasonable, and I don't see how using online annotation would be inefficient for my personal goal of becoming competent in online chess.

jennjollygreen
Fizzleputts wrote:

It is commonly known that when someone watches a video it's more of a passive learning experience when compared to reading a chess book with chess notation over a real board because you are actively participating in the endevour. I suppose one can use an ebook in the same fashion, however, it is also commonly known that 2d chess and 3dchess gets stored differently in the brain, therefore it's a different learning experience, than thus, if one only plays online chess, their OTB rating will suffer.

This is what Kaeldorn meant by common sense. It's not science that backs up these claims, it's years of people reporting that, they don't do as well when they only play online chess, etc.

Separately, I am saying that there is no data that ebook reading in general leads to worse reading comprehension than paperback reading in adults.

Obviously, if you add in a different skill (otb playing) and use the endpoint of competency in that skill (otb playing) as your metric, using paperback books and otb practice will beat ebook reading and online analysis/ practice. This is common sense, especially since one involves practicing the skill that you're using as a metric (otb study and practice) while the other doesn't (online study and practice).

jennjollygreen

No goal; Will just consume recommended content and figure out how I can improve. The game itself is very fun

calypsoxxxx
Did you find any YouTube videos you like? I’m also trying to learn better. Especially with how to avoid stalemate
jennjollygreen
calypsoxxxx wrote:
Did you find any YouTube videos you like? I’m also trying to learn better. Especially with how to avoid stalemate

Classics are John Bartholomew, Eric Rosen, and Gothamchess. They drop great tips for beginners (which I am now learning are Morphy's rules of chess, according to this book). I can't help with more specifics than that, though. These guys are entertaining and informative

RussBell

@jennjollygreen -

A couple of suggested openings...

IMO, a couple of the more fun openings (double king pawn 1.e4 e5) for White, and particularly suitable for the improving chess amateur are: Scotch Game & Gambit, and Vienna Game & Gambit .....these are aggressive openings, typically leading to exciting, tactical, 'open' games, which makes them particularly effective for speed chess - bullet, blitz, rapid etc...

Scotch G. & G.

A Magical Chess Opening for ALL Levels (Scotch, Potter Variation) - GothamChess...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdqbaqdHkPE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hF436giaRk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqX6am-Ms04

Vienna G. & G.

WIN WITH 1. E4 | The Vienna Gambit - GothamChess...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVxENCPcCjU

https://www.chess.com/blog/RussBell/introduction-to-the-vienna-game-gambit

You might check out GM Daniel Naroditsky's YouTube channel as well. He is probably my favorite YouTuber. (His content may seem a little advanced for you at present, but I believe you will conclude that he explains things extremely well)....

Master Class | Vienna Gambit | Chess Speedrun | Grandmaster Naroditsky

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4lW-6f56Cg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JyTKdxfD8no

Finally, a slightly less aggressive (at least initially), but still venomous opening suitable for the improving chess amateur is the Ponziani Opening...

The BEST Beginner Chess Opening - GothamChess.......

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TemLSMDKSMw

Chess Openings: Learn to Play the Ponziani Opening - The Chess Giant

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNxz6w0fmys&list=PLKx6s-gbAEVEqjZeF3ITtfKt8pjnMvJk3

Eric Rosen recommends the Ponziani as well...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tqZLFyZbfDk&list=PLdT3OotRiHJkJ9mpmXdLAjJdY6ZDpA-dt&index=2