What is the definition of beginners

natashaandboris

Beginners don't HAVE ratings! A new Beginner has never played a single game of chess, much less a rated national or international game. Beginners first learn the rules of the game, play as many casual games as possible and then (some players) start to think about playing rated games. You start with the minimum rating which is awarded in exchange for sending your name and membership fee, e.g. USCF 100 which has the assumption that you are breathing. Chess.com should take its first ratings for a player as their national (USCF, BCF, etc) or international (FIDE) ratings, not this ridiculous and lazy practice of making everyone 1200.

natashaandboris

OK, "lazy" is perhaps unfair. It is a lot of work to verify a new player's claimed rating. But if you are an established 2000+ player (USCF/FIDE), you play 20+ games here and win all but one because of e.g. a mouseslip or a cheating opponent, then your new, non-provisional rating is a kind of hole that is difficult to dig out of, i.e. you now need to win many more games to get to your appropriate level.

petrikeckman

These kind of draw plays are definition of the beginner. This happened just.

 

Angel_33

beginners are people who are starting to do something or learn something for the first time

Lesyadoll

Anyone who's better than me, which isn't hard to beat (i'm nothing so there you go)

MatthewDucky

0-600: Novice, month? of play.

600-1000: Maybe a year of casual play, a beginner.

1000-1400: A true intermediate player. Possibly opening knowledge. 

1400-1600: Amateur. Average tournament chess player.

1600-2000: Advanced amateur, approaching titles such as NM, CM, etc.

2000-2400: Most likely titled, IM territory.

2400-2700: Grandmaster (more like 2500-2700 but whatever)

2700+: Super GM