Chess rating system

Username333

@erik

ElenaStamataki

Does anyone know how I can resign from a game?

SmyslovFan

Click the resign button. It looks like a flag (you're waving the White Flag of surrender).

 

RichardSattanni
If I started with 1200, played and won by default for resignation by opponent , of course my ranking increases. If I succeeded at tutorial , I get added score for each passed? Does this number total reflect my new score rank? Will it change when I begin playing again? Does winning against computer also change score or strictly against ranked players only?
importantheart

It depends on what computer. 

Kowalski_x

This question hasn't been answered enough in 10 years?

SamParsi

Lol 

 

Madmad010

The chess rating is kinda putting you into a group like good-bad type thing.

Madmad010

1200 is a normal so not good or bad

khushpalsingh

how can i be blocked if my internet is slow, and has error,

How it is unfair if i cant move and u block me...

 

 

shame...on ADMIN, 

 

lord_of_india

chess rating system is a system used in chess to calculate an estimate of the strength of the player, based on his or her performance versus other players. They are used by organizations such as FIDE, the US Chess Federation (USCF or US Chess), International Correspondence Chess Federation, and the English Chess Federation. Most of the systems are used to recalculate ratings after a tournament or match but some are used to recalculate ratings after individual games. Popular online chess sites such as chess.comand Internet Chess Club also implement rating systems. In almost all systems a higher number indicates a stronger player. In general, players' ratings go up if they perform better than expected and down if they perform worse than expected. The magnitude of the change depends on the rating of their opponents. The Elo rating system is currently the most widely used.

The first modern rating system was used by the Correspondence Chess League of America in 1939. Soviet player Andrey Khachaturov proposed a similar system in 1946 (Hooper & Whyld 1992:332). The first one that made an impact on international chess was the Ingo system in 1948. The USCF adopted the Harkness system in 1950. Shortly after, the British Chess Federation started using a system devised by Richard W. B. Clarke. The USCF switched to the Elo rating system in 1960, which was adopted by FIDE in 1970 (Hooper & Whyld 1992:332).

drmrboss
Madmad010 wrote:

1200 is a normal so not good or bad

I disagreed! 1500 is the initial rating! 1200 means much lower than initial(mean), unrated player.

A 5-years old-kid or a guy who just learned to play chess today will start with 1500 rating initially when he start playing rated chess games! See the rating explanation in Wikipedia.

Actually, what rating you feel good is your personal perception. Some people may feel 800 rating is good, but some people may see 2800 rating is good.

 

 

null

PowerofHope
drmrboss wrote:
Madmad010 wrote:

1200 is a normal so not good or bad

I disagreed! 1500 is the initial rating! 1200 means much lower than initial(mean), unrated player.

A 5-years old-kid or a guy who just learned to play chess today will start with 1500 rating initially when he start playing rated chess games! See the rating explanation in Wikipedia.

Actually, what rating you feel good is your personal perception. Some people may feel 800 rating is good, but some people may see 2800 rating is good.

 

 

 

Is 2000 rating good enough to coach a class a player (11850-1900 fide) like me or should I get a stronger coach??

NelsonMoore

They changed it later on so your initial rating varies dependent on what you say your level is, but they don't let you reset it if you get it wrong first time.

It would be ideal if you had no initial rating, and played some games against the different computer levels to set it before you start playing real players.

As it is your rating can move in artificial ways for various reasons, in particular if you play against someone using an engine. Not only when you lose to them when their rating is low, but also when they get closed down on you in the middle of a game and you get an artificial boost when they time out (something I am about to receive very soon).

Seems I'm being rewarded for not getting checkmated or hitting a resignable position within 22 and 26 moves respectively. 

 

PowerofHope
NelsonMoore wrote:

They changed it later on so your initial rating varies dependent on what you say your level is, but they don't let you reset it if you get it wrong first time.

It would be ideal if you had no initial rating, and played some games against the different computer levels to set it before you start playing real players.

As it is your rating can move in artificial ways for various reasons, in particular if you play against someone using an engine. Not only when you lose to them when their rating is low, but also when they get closed down on you in the middle of a game and you get an artificial boost when they time out (something I am about to receive very soon).

Seems I'm being rewarded for not getting checkmated or hitting a resignable position within 22 and 26 moves respectively. 

 

At your blitz rating I wouldn't worry too much about computer assistance in blitz games.

Ultimate_Fighter
PowerofHope wrote:
NelsonMoore wrote:

They changed it later on so your initial rating varies dependent on what you say your level is, but they don't let you reset it if you get it wrong first time.

It would be ideal if you had no initial rating, and played some games against the different computer levels to set it before you start playing real players.

As it is your rating can move in artificial ways for various reasons, in particular if you play against someone using an engine. Not only when you lose to them when their rating is low, but also when they get closed down on you in the middle of a game and you get an artificial boost when they time out (something I am about to receive very soon).

Seems I'm being rewarded for not getting checkmated or hitting a resignable position within 22 and 26 moves respectively. 

 

At your blitz rating I wouldn't worry too much about computer assistance in blitz games.

 

 

Hmmmmm………  nevermind, I won't say anything.

petrip
NelsonMoore wrote:

They changed it later on so your initial rating varies dependent on what you say your level is, but they don't let you reset it if you get it wrong first time.

 

Not necessary as at 1st changes per game are large like few hundreds of points. it gets to correct level quite soon

Ultimate_Fighter

In some ways ratings do matter.

chitownwarrior

the rating system on chess.com is stupid! the so. called system is not how it works in the real chess world! if your a Grand Master you don't stop being a Grand Master because you lose a game!! this is stupid!!