Why isn't copying from an opening explorer during a game considered cheating?

  • #61

    The endgame tablebases give perfect solutions, so if allow use there is no play at all, for positions that are applicable. It is a minor issue though because positions with small enough number of peices and/or pawns are quite rare to occur in actual game.

  • #62
    TwoMove skrev:

    Far as I can see most of the posts are variations on theme "I don't like the fact opponent is researching moves". The easy answer to that is play OTB chess, or live chess at fast enough time controls.

    even in otb chess you cannot be sure of that I played a variation otb that I know and I know I have been playing the same variation against an opponent suddenly after move 7 he started looking through his notation book, I stopped him from researching move 7. which I remember that he played correct last time but not this time.

  • #63

    In otb play what you are describing is cheating pure and simple. It's an enforcable rule in otb play, precisely because you can see them doing it.

  • #64

    I agree that nobody can check opening support. No difference between having the moves in your head or in a book or database...

  • #65
    TwoMove skrev:

    In otb play what you are describing is cheating pure and simple. It's an enforcable rule in otb play, precisely because you can see them doing it.

    yes but if I left the table he would have gotten away with it.

  • #66

    Normally you are playing in a Tournament or Team match when playing OTB, so there is a good chance of somebody seing a person doing this. Its a clearly known and understood rule cheating when doing this in OTB games. In turn base and correspondence games there is no hope of detecting someone studying openings, and the timescale for a game is long, so you can't unlearn information that you learnt for OTB games or whatever. So there is 150 year old tradition in correspondence chess that researching isn't cheating. None of this seems to be rocket science to me Smile.

  • #67
    TwoMove skrev:

    Normally you are playing in a Tournament or Team match when playing OTB, so there is a good chance of somebody seing a person doing this. Its a clearly known and understood rule cheating when doing this in OTB games. In turn base and correspondence games there is no hope of detecting someone studying openings, and the timescale for a game is long, so you can't unlearn information that you learnt for OTB games or whatever. So there is 150 year old tradition in correspondence chess that researching isn't cheating. None of this seems to be rocket science to me .

    obviously he had a bad memory since he didn't remember move 7. so somehow he unlearned it lol

  • #68

    The site uses a link in the game window right to the database so I assume it's not only allowed but encouraged.  I try not to look too much unless I'm playing a weird line that I wonder if it's been played before, or I reach a position I'm utterly clueless how to proceed.

  • #69

    If you Google "databases and their discontents," you'll find an article that discusses the rules and traditions of correspondence play. In addition, you'll find reference to other discussions where folks who are ignorant of these traditions sound off.

    http://chessskill.blogspot.com/2011/03/databases-and-their-discontents_28.html 

  • #70

    the only disadvantage of playing with explorer is that the oponent can play with out any blunders since moves suggested may not be the best but they are almost 100 free of blunders.

    in otb you can win because you know a variation better than your opponent  and he may blunder because he plays a bad move.

    if people stick to the explorer they may survive the opening.

    in otb a lot of players are so good in knowing the opening that people rarely survive the opening against them.

  • #71
    bobbyDK wrote:

    the only disadvantage of playing with explorer is that the oponent can play with out any blunders since moves suggested may not be the best but they are almost 100 free of blunders.

     

    A little closer to 70% (and that only through seven or eight moves in most opening systems).

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