You want to open but encounter premature attacks


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #21

    goldendog

    I think about baseball.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #22

    cheapendgametricks

    I also hate these pesky opponents who play moves you don't like.  They should be banned from the site.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #23

    pelly13

    Franquis schreef:

    Sounds good, guys. It's about time I branch out and try new things and yes, Pelly, send the links if you will.

    In the KIA , it is White's Q-side Bishop that does the trick. It is like an arrow on a bow , at first blocked in but soon ready to be fired.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4BucKIccB4

    If you like an example of a short KIA game , I can show you a corr. game I recently played on cc.

    PS : 29 oct -> I will now reveal the names of the players in the next game :

     



    Another opening you might be interested in , is the Trompovsky . It goes 1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5 etc. I played it a lot and most of the time I went for an opposite castling position. I would castle Q-side and blast Blacks K-side with my advancing g,h pawns opening the lines.

    Less violent but very solid is the Catalan opening 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.g3 .. It looks (starts) harmless , but can cause Black a lot of trouble developing his Q-side. Don't put your Knight on c3 ! .

    Finally , try the Reti gambit : 1.Nf3 d5 2.c4 and when Black takes on d4 (now or later) , you just develop your pieces , castle and only then try to regain the pawn. If Black tries to hold-on to it , you can cause him fatal injury. Some of the position can resemble a Catalan .

    All three opening have the benifit that Black can't do much to avoid it. You will almost always get the position you aim for. With the exception of the Tromp , there is little or no contact , no chances for enemy tactics. They are not sharp openings , but solid and flexible. What else do you want ? .

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #24

    Franquis

    This is all good stuff, Pelly, and sure- send an example! 

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #25

    pelly13

    Franquis schreef:

    This is all good stuff, Pelly, and sure- send an example! 

    Just done it. See my previous editted post.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #26

    Talfan1

    lets say for example this happens 1e4 ..e5 2knf3....f5 no time for your pet opening black is trying to seize the initiative thats when the game really begins ps i always play d4 here 

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #27

    Franquis

    I'm seeing that I really don't know or have a specific opening... I think that's my weakness- getting out of the gate comfortably in the first 3-4 moves and knowing what's going on as far as what to expect move-wise. I guess I'll just have to put in the work and stick with a couple of openings and be consistent

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #28

    pelly13

    Pengola schreef:

    Weeeeell, I won but only on time.

    Ithink my opponent overextended himself. but I obviously went wrong, somewhere !

    Any advice ? or how to post the game ?

    Clearly I need more practice and info about the strategies so any help appreciated

    Pengy 

    Not bad for a first-timer. In general Black tends to overextend in the KIA.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #29

    TheArtofWar82

    This is a really good thread. Thanks to all who have contributed.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #30

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    cheapendgametricks wrote:

    I also hate these pesky opponents who play moves you don't like.  They should be banned from the site.

    Or you could fix holes in your own understanding.  I for example hate closed positions, the Nxe5-Nxe5-d4 trick since it makes Bc5 unviable in many open games, or anything where a simple knight move would undermine a bishop's bolstering of a center, stonewall or Marcozy Bind setups as they firmly grip a central square, but you have to learn to live and deal with them. 

    The fundamental flaw with the approach they take is they won't be comfortable in every position either.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #31

    groggy55

    Personally I understand what you are saying. While I'm not claiming any type of chess superiority, I find it frustrating as well. However, I try and determine what is his weaknesses. What must I do to prepare to punish them. In poker there is a saying "Punish the limpers" Same thing in chess. Some guy brings his queen and bishop out for an early attack, I will re-arrange my moves to keep him moving his queen while I'm getting my army out. Punish them for poor development. Use your better development to crush them. 

    I also found very helpful was studying mating patterns and techniques. You would be suprised how much you can punish a king in the middle of the board with no development

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #32

    rooperi

    Funny how different people like different things.

    The things the OP dislike are exactly the ones I like.

    I love messy positions.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #33

    TheArtofWar82

    groggy55 wrote:

    Personally I understand what you are saying. While I'm not claiming any type of chess superiority, I find it frustrating as well. However, I try and determine what is his weaknesses. What must I do to prepare to punish them. In poker there is a saying "Punish the limpers" Same thing in chess. Some guy brings his queen and bishop out for an early attack, I will re-arrange my moves to keep him moving his queen while I'm getting my army out. Punish them for poor development. Use your better development to crush them. 

    I also found very helpful was studying mating patterns and techniques. You would be suprised how much you can punish a king in the middle of the board with no development

    1) I tried everything I could to get as into poker as I am into chess and I just couldn't do it. It's a great game, but Chess is definitely more for me.

    2) Tempo and development is the key, indeed. Once his "premature" attack fails, he'll wind up with less development and in a position where either attacking or defending, he'll have less fire power where it's needed. He won't be able to respond to your threats nor mount serious threats of his own.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #34

    kikvors

    Franquis schreef:

    Maybe 10 moves in the opening is a lot.... better to have said 7-8? Anyway, I'm trying to acheive an opening where both sides are developed and sizing each other up before going in for exchanges... maybe that's not possible (?) but either way...

    In general chess is a game where every move matters. You don't just play a number of standard moves and only then look what your opponent has done. That goes for exchanges as well as for other moves.

    But I feel this whole thread would have been better if you had shown us one or two examples of what your problem is. Maybe your opponents are playing silly attacks, or maybe you're just playing naive chess.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #35

    groggy55

    TheArtofWar82 wrote:
    groggy55 wrote:

    Personally I understand what you are saying. While I'm not claiming any type of chess superiority, I find it frustrating as well. However, I try and determine what is his weaknesses. What must I do to prepare to punish them. In poker there is a saying "Punish the limpers" Same thing in chess. Some guy brings his queen and bishop out for an early attack, I will re-arrange my moves to keep him moving his queen while I'm getting my army out. Punish them for poor development. Use your better development to crush them. 

    I also found very helpful was studying mating patterns and techniques. You would be suprised how much you can punish a king in the middle of the board with no development

    1) I tried everything I could to get as into poker as I am into chess and I just couldn't do it. It's a great game, but Chess is definitely more for me.

    2) Tempo and development is the key, indeed. Once his "premature" attack fails, he'll wind up with less development and in a position where either attacking or defending, he'll have less fire power where it's needed. He won't be able to respond to your threats nor mount serious threats of his own.

     

    I like both games. I go back and forth between poker and chess and surpisingly, both of them help me get better at the other. In chess, opponent just blasted through with his queen. In poker, you are facing a large river bet. Both cases, you have to evaluate everything to determine if your opponent can win. You always have more information in chess. I personally love to look at Tal's games. He's an amazing attacker, never afraid of an exchange and was absolutely brilliant at opening up attacking lines. 

    Sorry got a little off topic. In chess, if you opponent wants to neglect proper development to instead start trading pieces and attacking before they are developed, remember to punish him for his errors. In poker, you're on the button and have 7 limpers in front of you, punish them, raise. Doesn't matter what you're cards are. Although, watchout for the 1st person in, he might be holding the goods. Always keep evaluating your situation.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #36

    pelly13

    Just updated my original post with the KIA game. Just to be complete and clear.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #37

    TheArtofWar82

    groggy55 wrote:
    TheArtofWar82 wrote:
    groggy55 wrote:

    Personally I understand what you are saying. While I'm not claiming any type of chess superiority, I find it frustrating as well. However, I try and determine what is his weaknesses. What must I do to prepare to punish them. In poker there is a saying "Punish the limpers" Same thing in chess. Some guy brings his queen and bishop out for an early attack, I will re-arrange my moves to keep him moving his queen while I'm getting my army out. Punish them for poor development. Use your better development to crush them. 

    I also found very helpful was studying mating patterns and techniques. You would be suprised how much you can punish a king in the middle of the board with no development

    1) I tried everything I could to get as into poker as I am into chess and I just couldn't do it. It's a great game, but Chess is definitely more for me.

    2) Tempo and development is the key, indeed. Once his "premature" attack fails, he'll wind up with less development and in a position where either attacking or defending, he'll have less fire power where it's needed. He won't be able to respond to your threats nor mount serious threats of his own.

     

    I like both games. I go back and forth between poker and chess and surpisingly, both of them help me get better at the other. In chess, opponent just blasted through with his queen. In poker, you are facing a large river bet. Both cases, you have to evaluate everything to determine if your opponent can win. You always have more information in chess. I personally love to look at Tal's games. He's an amazing attacker, never afraid of an exchange and was absolutely brilliant at opening up attacking lines. 

    Sorry got a little off topic. In chess, if you opponent wants to neglect proper development to instead start trading pieces and attacking before they are developed, remember to punish him for his errors. In poker, you're on the button and have 7 limpers in front of you, punish them, raise. Doesn't matter what you're cards are. Although, watchout for the 1st person in, he might be holding the goods. Always keep evaluating your situation.

    One word: Variance. I hate it. I cannot stand watching guys get lucky on the river. 

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #38

    ponz111

    If someone does a "premature attack" then by definition he is making a mistake and it is quite often a losing mistake.

    So my thesis is you should not "avoid" situations where someone does a "premature" attack. Instead you should learn how to deal with premature attacks and then you will welcome "premature attacks"


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