is it legal to use a seperate board?

mkilborn468
baddogno wrote:
mkilborn468 wrote:

By the way... Chess.com offers an "analysis board" that's a simple click off of Daily Chess, and sets up your current position with the ability to move pieces around. How could that "second board" not be not allowed when chess.com takes you to it? 

The discussion is primarily about live games,  No one is disputing your right to use as many boards as you want in correspondence chess ("Daily Chess").

 

Fair enough, but the original question was: "Either in 30 min or 2 day chess are you allowed to recreate positions on your own board to help with visualization". Just responding to the question as the OP asked it.

Cheers

MickinMD
jeff2e16 wrote:

For What it's Worth.

This is an excerpt from Chess.com on Fair Play.  Here is the link to the rest of the info.  https://support.chess.com/customer/portal/articles/1444879 

 

The rule says no ANALYSIS board is allowed in live chess.  But I would think a board with the exact same position as the game would be ok since it is not an analysis board.  This would not contradict the OTB rule since OTB includes a 3D board.

Personally, I've reached the point where it's harder for me to visualize on a 3D board - I often miss what's going on along diagonals - so I'm happy using the 2D board on my display.

Of course, for daily games, I use a separate analysis board, usually on Lucas Chess's "Create Your Own Game" full-screen board. If I accidentally hit the "Help Move" button or double-click on a move and the analysis mode kicks-in, I always have that option set to Stockfish 10, 20-ply, which takes over a minute to do, so I have time to close the game and its window before any help pops-up and then I retrieve the saved current game position or a position I explored from the saved files.

Firebrandx

The trick is to never play slower than 3 min blitz. People won't have time to shuffle pieces on a real board. ;-)

 

MGleason

Live chess is meant to imitate OTB chess as closely as possible.  As such, no, setting up the position on a separate board is not permitted.

This rule is obviously difficult to enforce, but for those who want to follow the rules, that's the rule, and the reason for the rule.

In daily chess, of course, you can use an analysis board all you like.

Scottrf

A separate board imitates otb better than the computer screen.

MGleason

Not really, because OTB you can't have a separate board to try out different lines as an aid to visualisation.

Scottrf

Nobody is talking about additional lines, just replicating.

MGleason

Merely replicating moves might technically be against the rules, but that would be unenforceable and pretty unimportant.  Using a physical board as an analysis board for trying out different lines is clearly against the rules.

Scottrf

Agreed. Some people literally like to set up the board to practice looking at a 3D board. I just think saying it’s against the rules is nitpicking.

lfPatriotGames
Scottrf wrote:

A separate board imitates otb better than the computer screen.

I was thinking the exact same thing. Which is why MGleasons response makes so little sense to me. What better way to replicate over the board, than over the board? I had to use a real board to duplicate the moves when I first started playing on chess.com because the computer screen was so difficult for me to get used to. I was so used to playing on a  real board, I would make very embarrassing moves, simply because I just wasnt used to "seeing" a chessboard that way. 

If anything I would think chess.com would encourage using a real board for people who cant get the hang of computer screens because losing easily to someone rated hundreds of points lower could be considered rating manipulation.  I think the same things applies to the different colored boards, and different style pieces. If someone (like me anyway) were to play a blue and white board with odd looking different colored pieces, I wouldn't be able to "see" the board and pieces like I'm used to. So I would start losing badly to people rated far below me. If it's something that people are familiar with, that helps them play their normal game, I cant imagine any reasonable reason to be against it. 

MGleason

@IfPatriotGames, see my most recent comment.  If you're using a physical board as an analysis board to try out different moves as an aid to visualisation, that's definitely against the rules (albeit difficult to enforce).

If you're just copying the moves from the game to see the position on a physical board rather than on-screen, it might technically be against the rules but isn't a big deal.

lfPatriotGames
MGleason wrote:

@IfPatriotGames, see my most recent comment.  If you're using a physical board as an analysis board to try out different moves as an aid to visualisation, that's definitely against the rules (albeit difficult to enforce).

If you're just copying the moves from the game to see the position on a physical board rather than on-screen, it might technically be against the rules but isn't a big deal.

I saw your most recent comment. I also saw your comment about live chess being meant to replicate otb chess as closely as possible. I also saw Scotts comment about a separate board imitating otb better than a computer screen which is obviously true. What doesn't make sense to me, at all, is how using a separate board to duplicate moves could technically be against any rule. What rule is that technically against? How can someone get closer to over the board chess than over the board chess? 

As I said before, I had to use a separate board when I started playing online games because chess on a computer screen was so foreign to me. I was making moves that could only be explained as intentionally trying to lose, which I'm sure is also against the rules. There are probably other things chess.com could do to replicate over the board as much as possible, like forcing people to use the same colored board and pieces. In an over the board game, both sides dont use different style chess pieces, yet online it's allowed to help with visualization. Also, some people have bad eyesight, so they use glasses to help them see the board. That's an outside aide helping them that their opponent is not using. It just seems to me using a separate board is a non issue. Saying it's "technically" against the rules seems so unnecessary.

quentle

as MGleason says 'it might technically be against the rules but isn't a big deal.'

But when you have a discussion about the rules, you can expect nit-picking. Rules develop organically, and they are not always entirely logical.

But if a poster asks a specific question about the rules, expect unnecessary technicalities to be opened up!

So, if you find you need to make the moves on a physical board to help you visualise, fair enough, no is going to moan. But bear in mind that if you so much as touch a piece on your board, then you have to move it. And if you lift a piece and place it on a square, then that is the move you have to make on line. No changing your mind. Otherwise you are cheating !

(And no, you can't say j'adoube over and over again while you play out a variation !!)