SciFiChess
Joined
Jan 4, 2018
Last Online
7 hrs ago
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Admin: wk.pngMath and Chess Club wk.pngInstitute of Chess

Coordinator: wk.pngThe Regina's Club wk.pngHappyLunchBox and Friends Chess Club

Chess: I have played in numerous USCF over the board tournaments. Now I mainly focus on daily games of standard chess and chess960, as well as promoting fair play in daily chess. My goal is to become a USCF Candidate Master in correspondence chess.

If I could propose a new time control for daily chess, it would look like this.

  • Start with 3 days on the clock.
  • After each move, carry over unused time and add 3 additional days.
  • Have a cap so that a player cannot use any more than 10 days on a single move unless they use vacation time, although they still keep all unused time even if it is more than 10 days.

Blog

How Many Different Chess Positions Are There? (Quiz)

How Many Different Chess Positions Are There? (Solutions)

Geometric Partition of a Circle Using Lines

Why are the black pawns attacking their king?

Chess in the Year 2100

Clubs

This is the club picture that I designed for The Regina's Club.

Forum

Why are the black pawns attacking their king?

SciFiChess Math Quiz #1 (Infinite ordinals)

Quizzes (Offbeat Quizzes)

  • 8th Grade Math quiz and Classic Arcade Game quiz
  • Website will grade quiz as soon as you finish
  • Links may not be available outside USA

SciFiChess Math Quiz #2 (Hexadecimal and tetration)

SciFiChess Math Quiz #3 (2-dimensional geometry and combinatorics)

SciFiChess Math Quiz #4 (Large integers and Fibonacci sequence)

SciFiChess Math Quiz #5 (2-dimensional geometry)

SciFiChess Math Quiz #6 (Periodic and continuous functions)

SciFiChess Math Quiz #7 (2-dimensional geometry, updated December 31, 2019)

SciFiChess Math Quiz #8 (Complex, algebraic and transcendental numbers)

SciFiChess Math Quiz #9 (4-dimensional geometry)

SciFiChess Math Quiz #10 (3-dimensional geometry)

Games

White was played by FIDE Master Marco Ferrante (FIDE Rating 2333) and I played black. White offered a draw after move 20.

Sicilian Defense: Open, Najdorf, Poisoned Pawn Variation Accepted

There are 3 moves I want to highlight.

  • White played 16. Rd1, which is by far the most popular move in the chess.com master game database, and a good move according to the computer analysis. The only other move in the database is 16. Nxf6+, which the computer analysis claims is the best move.
  • Black played 18… Ra7?, which is the most popular move in the database by a slim margin, but the computer analysis calls the move a mistake (not an inaccuracy). The only other move in the database is 18… f5, which the computer analysis claims is the best move.
  • White played 19. Rf3, which is the most popular move in the database by a slim margin, and a good move according to the computer analysis. The only other move in the database is 19. Qh6, which the computer analysis claims is the best move.

These are links with more information.

Game on chess.com

@Ferrante89

FIDE Profile for Marco Ferrante

White was played by National Master Gabriel Gonzaga Garcia from Brazil (FIDE Rating 2199) and I played black. When the clock expired black was ahead by -5.1.

FIDE Profile for Gabriel Gonzaga Garcia

Books

We by Yevgeny Zamyatin, published 1924

The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien, published September 21, 1937

The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien

The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury, published May 4, 1950

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, published October 19, 1953

The Stars My Destination by Alfred Bester, published March 21, 1957

Ubik by Philip K. Dick, published 1969

Gödel, Escher, Bach by Douglas Hofstadter, published 1979, nonfiction

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, published October 12, 1979

The Restaurant at the End of the Universe by Douglas Adams, published October 1980

Life, the Universe and Everything by Douglas Adams, published August 1982

Infinity and the Mind by Rudy Rucker, published May 1, 1982, nonfiction

Quotes

  • “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.” – Anonymous
  • “Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please.” – Mark Twain
  • “I don’t like to commit myself about heaven and hell – you see, I have friends in both places.” – Mark Twain
  • “I really didn’t say everything I said!” – Yogi Berra
  • “We made too many wrong mistakes.” – Yogi Berra (This is my chess game.)
  • “Ninety percent of the game is half mental.” – Yogi Berra
  • “You’ve got to be very careful if you don’t know where you are going, because you might not get there.” – Yogi Berra
  • “I like the moment when I break a man's ego.” – Bobby Fischer
  • “Arrogant, pompous, obnoxious, vain, cruel, verbose, a showoff. I have been called all of these. Of course, I am.” – Howard Cosell
  • Howard Cosell liked to use big words. One exchange with Muhammad Ali went like this.

    Cosell: “You’re being extremely truculent.”

    Ali: “Whatever truculent means, if that’s good, I’m that.”
  • This is a passage out of #9 The Weirdest World Championship from 10 Craziest Events In The History Of Chess. The event was the 1978 World Chess Championship between Anatoly Karpov and Viktor Korchnoi.

    “Korchnoi was also bothered by a member of the Soviet entourage named Vladimir Zukhar, a parapsychologist who would sit in the front row and stare malevolently at him. Korchnoi suspected that Zukhar was hypnotizing him and interfering with his brain waves. Thanks to the “psychic,” Korchnoi was a nervous wreck by the seventh game.”