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Middlegame & Endgames Ideas - #2 = Trades

  • NM HowToTameADragon
  • | Jan 9, 2014
  • | 3657 views
  • | 11 comments

Hi guys,

As requested, I'll be doing an article on trades this week (i'll do minority attacks next week & Zwischenzug in the following week)

To start off, a game between two world champions  =

     php6OdLWK.jpeg        VSphpaUPg9Y.jpeg           

           Tigran Petrosian              Robert "Bobby" Fischer

This game is very instructional on a whole scale as to where to trade pieces based on the position - but I will now go into same piece exchanges (ie: NxN or BxB or RxR or QxQ)

Knight X Knight

In the middlegame - trades favor the side with the less centralized knight (on most occasions, however, it can also favor the side that's defending).

For example, trading a black knight on e4 with a white one on d2 would favor white for 2 reasons - the black knight has moved twice while the white one has only moved once & the black knight is more centralized so it is stronger

Bishop X Bishop

Knowing when to trade off same color bishops is important in middlegame play. There are 3 main reasons in trading off bishops: Removing a defender, Attacker or a bishop with a stronger diagonal.

Knight X Bishop

A knight x Bishop trade is used to A.gain the 2 bishop advantage B.removing a defender of pawns C.removing a bishop that can cause mate/material threats

Bishop X Knight

This is a far more uncommon trade - this is mainly used to remove A. A centralized knight or B.A blockader

Rook X Rook

This is used to remove a farther advanced rook (ie: a rook on the 7th), help to promote a pawn, or gain access to key squares with the other pieces

Queen X Queen

This is very common in Chess - normally used for A. Pure calculated win B. Better placed minors and rooks C. Force equality

Endgame

In endgame positions - the trading of any piece is due to pure calculation (of either a forced win or a draw) or the piece that is being traded is worse than the piece that it is being traded for

Thanks,

HowToTameADragon



Comments


  • 6 months ago

    fateofnate

    Good article! But can you elaborate more of why, in the Petrosian vs. Fischer game, one piece is better than the other? If so, that would be great!

  • 6 months ago

    GMVillads

    Dont look at the pieces which are traded, look what is left!

  • 6 months ago

    upen2002

    thanks

  • 6 months ago

    Ronrgamer26

    thanks ..........especially the EXCHANGES.......thoses are very informative 4 me

  • 6 months ago

    Ferdinand_B

    @NegativeBlue,
    You're right there's no reason not to take this pawn with check, although Qxc5+ makes no difference as the game's already lost: after Kh1 white threatens Rxf7 mate, so black has to play either f6, which leads to the win in the game, or Qh5, on which I think Bxf7 wins totally.

  • 6 months ago

    NegativeBlue

    Why didn't Fischer respond 27. Rf1, Qxc5+?

    Better yet, what was the significance of 27. Rf1, f6? Why was it better than the former?

  • 6 months ago

    StevieBlues

    Thanks! Good approach on a tricky subject. Revisit this one sometime please!

  • 6 months ago

    elo123

    An excellent and simplistic article. I think I'll be returning back to this as a good reference page.

  • 6 months ago

    Pawnslinger1

    Very instructive article. Thanks for writing it.

  • 6 months ago

    NM HowToTameADragon

    There - now it is a simpler title

  • 6 months ago

    chessbond001

    nice article!! well, the name of the article is quite similar to this one 

    http://www.chess.com/forum/view/endgames/to-take-or-not-to-take

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