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The Amateurs Mind PGN


  • 5 years ago · Quote · #1

    drdaverea

    For anyone studying "The Amateurs Mind" by IM Jeremy Silman

    I have just finished making PGN files, that can be opened in most (if not all) chess programs, out of every diagram in the book to help with studying it. Anyone interested in them feel free to message me and I'll email them to you.

    Dave

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #2

    goldendog

    The pgn of this book already exists:

    http://wwwu.uni-klu.ac.at/gossimit/c/book.htm

    Other book pgn files here:

    http://www.gambitchess.com/dx.html

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #3

    drdaverea

    Thanks goldendog.

    I thought there would be somewhere but I couldn't find them.

    Dave

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #4

    miconian

    The code for Amateur's Mind at doldendog's link is not PGN; it's CBH. I'm on an Intel Mac and I'm having trouble finding software that opens CBH files; so I think having a PGN would be useful.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #5

    mengeltov

    brilliant work. cheers dave.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #6

    richie_and_oprah

    one of the dumbest and most overrated chess books ever published

    can anyone imagine a book to get better at the practice of medicine called, 'the malpractice mind' or a book to help people become better lawyers titled, 'the disbarred attorney's' mind?

    there is no way that spending page after page detailing the limits of some people's chess acumen is a viable tool for anyone to get better and there are scores of book so much better than this waste of paper that will actually help people visualize, calculate, and improve memory





     

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #7

    chrka

    miconian wrote:

    The code for Amateur's Mind at doldendog's link is not PGN; it's CBH. I'm on an Intel Mac and I'm having trouble finding software that opens CBH files; so I think having a PGN would be useful.

    There is a nice program called WineBottler that allows you to take a Windows program and create a Mac application from it. It works ok with Chessbase Reader (IIRC, you have to fiddle with the appearance of the pieces to make it look ok, I think you have to turn off the shadows or something) which you can use to export CBH to PGN. 

    There might be some issues with Maverick though. My previously converted applications no longer work but I haven't had time to look into it yet.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #8

    EscherehcsE

    richie_and_oprah wrote:

    one of the dumbest and most overrated chess books ever published

    can anyone imagine a book to get better at the practice of medicine called, 'the malpractice mind' or a book to help people become better lawyers titled, 'the disbarred attorney's' mind?

    there is no way that spending page after page detailing the limits of some people's chess acumen is a viable tool for anyone to get better and there are scores of book so much better than this waste of paper that will actually help people visualize, calculate, and improve memory

     

    Hey, I've been cheated out of some capital letters and periods! Wink

    (I picked up a copy of the book somewhere but haven't read it yet. You really hate it that much?)

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #9

    Somebodysson

    funny, I hated it too, with a similar amount of 'hatred' as richieand oprah, but possibly for different reasons. The thing is, this subject, viz. chess amateurs' thinking processes, has been dealt with before. Euwe, Davis and Norwood, and probably others have good book on it. However I found the dialogue in Amateur's Mind intolerable, and I couldn't get past my dislike of the dialogue into the contents of the book.  I hope to get back to it someday, and get past my reactions to the dialogue. 

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #10

    DelCheMethod

    I don't believe Richie has read the book based on his comments. Always love book reviews based on the reader only reading the jacket. /sarcasm off

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #11

    MISTERGQ

    Honestly, I like it. The book was very accessable to me. I like how it shows several mistakes and errors in the minds of amateurs. I found that I made similar mistakes to the amateurs and was able to correct them. My rating on chess.com saw a big jump, in combination with rigorour tactics training. I know it cant just be the tactics trainer because I saw no improvement until I picked up the amateur's mind. Like anything, it has flaws, but it is a very practical book for the practical player. I also like his endgame manual. 

     

    The way he lays his books out makes it easy for people that can't stand the chess books that layout like VCR manuals. I'm about half-way through, and I think someone else could tech initiative and development better, but most of the other chapters are great! What I really learned from much of the amateurs dialogue was that they knew the problem in the position, but would often ignore it for surperflous 'advantages.'

     

    It's good in the fact that I learned when I need to calculate, and when I can play by rules. My positional, and chess awareness has gone way up by learning that not all attacks have to be dealt with, and not all attacks are worth making. His ideas that development of plans are also well written. 

     

    I would recommend it to anyone that wasn't an elitist and values practical advice.

     

    To those saying that it's not perfect: you aren't perfect. Much of the criticism comes from those that compete on the GM level, which is realistically never going to be achieved by many.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #12

    Somebodysson

    MISTERGQ wrote:

    Honestly, I like it. The book was very accessable to me. I like how it shows several mistakes and errors in the minds of amateurs. I found that I made similar mistakes to the amateurs and was able to correct them. My rating on chess.com saw a big jump, in combination with rigorour tactics training. I know it cant just be the tactics trainer because I saw no improvement until I picked up the amateur's mind.

    What I really learned from much of the amateurs dialogue was that they knew the problem in the position, but would often ignore it for surperflous 'advantages.'

     

    It's good in the fact that I learned when I need to calculate, and when I can play by rules. My positional, and chess awareness has gone way up by learning that not all attacks have to be dealt with, and not all attacks are worth making. His ideas that development of plans are also well written. 

     

    you just made me want to look at it again. Your review is very helpful. I want to get past my reactions to the dialogue and learn the lessons. Thanks for saying more than just "I liked it." or "you're wrong". By writing about your experience of reading it and the effect it had on your game...I'm going to pick it up again. It may just be exactly what I need. And what you wrote about not just tactis trainer...is very relevant to me. I've gotten half decent at tactics puzzles, and I still don't have any idea of what plan to make at the board. So, thanks.  

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #13

    AmishHacker

    I know this thread is very old, but it still comes up as the top relevant post on Google for The Amateur's Mind PGN files.  The link at the top is long broken, but I also have a PGN/Chessbase file set for this book I created myself. 

    PGN - Download

    Chessbase - Download 

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #14

    SSJGQ

    AmishHacker..  Thanks a lot!  These are fantastic! 


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