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A complete demonstration of the Ruy Lopez


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    NjChristian

    My preferred opening as white i the Ruy Lopez, so naturally I did some reading on it. Of course I needed some way to store the numerous lines and variations arising from this defense, including what i might play, as well as what I might see from black. So I decided to create a diagram covering almst every position that might come from this opening, and if I had already created it, there was no reason not to share it with everyone here on chess.com. The only problem I encountered was that my computer slowed down because of the large size of the diagram, so I instead made 3 different diagrams which, together, achieve my initial goal.

    *Note - the lines in the diagrams follow the article. ie. Don't think that just because it is root variation of the diagram that it is the main variation. The author actually liked to first go through the more zany variations. I prbably should have structured it with the main line of the Ruy Lopez as the main line in the diagram, but I suppose it is what it is Undecided

    The first diagram goes through variations of the Berlin Defense (3…Nf6), Bird’s Defense (3…Nd4), the Classical/Cordel Defense (3…Bc5), the Schliemann Gambit (3…f5), the Steinitz Defense (3…d6), and covers some ideas of the main line with 3…a6, including the exchange variation and the Morphy Defense (4. Ba4). The final line it contains is the (probably worse) 6.Re1 variation in the Open Defense (5…Nxe4) deriving from the Morphy Defense.

     

     

    The second diagram finishes looking at the Open Defense and moves on to lines in the Closed Defense (5…Be7), including the Center Attack (6. d4), the Worrall Attack (6. Qe2), and finally continues with the main line after 6. Re1. It finishes with looking at various lines of the Marshall Counter Gambit after 7…O-O, as well as ways to avoid the counter gambit as white if you see black play this move.

     

    This final diagram looks at positions where black avoids the Marshall Counter Gambit, instead opting for a more solid defense, especially after the Chigorin Variation of 9…Na5, which is one of the most popular lines for the Ruy Lopez along with the previously covered Berlin Defense.

     

     
     
     
    The link to the article is http://homepage.ntlworld.com/adam.bozon/ruylopez.htm and includes a number of example games using the Ruy Lopez. Perhaps this post is best used in conjunction with the article, reading it and viewing the results here.
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    juanoxgeneroso

    Just play the moves man, and practice it more often.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    beintime

    this is great, it should be more appreciated

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    browni3141

    beintime wrote:

    this is great, it should be more appreciated


    I stopped reading when he said the Ruy Lopez was a defense.

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #5

    crypticplague

    this takes a long time and effort to do... should get more views.

    Anyways, this is excellent!

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #6

    plutonia

    I have a quick question: black guards the f5 square with his bishop. If you jump there with your knight supported only by your pawn and he takes it, is it a good thing or a bad thing for you to have your central pawn moved to f5?

    It looked like a thorn in black's position, but on the other hand it seems securely blockaded against the black knight on f6.

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #7

    Estragon

    plutonia wrote:

    I have a quick question: black guards the f5 square with his bishop. If you jump there with your knight supported only by your pawn and he takes it, is it a good thing or a bad thing for you to have your central pawn moved to f5?

    It looked like a thorn in black's position, but on the other hand it seems securely blockaded against the black knight on f6.

    As with almost every question - although this is more specific than most - it depends on the position.

    In Closed Ruy positions, where White has maneuvered the Nb1-d2-f1-g3/e3-f5, we can presume he has calculated some advantage gained by allowing ...Bxf5 e4xf5, else he need not play Nf5.  This would usually entail some tactical possibility involving the f5 pawn or, less frequently, the vacated e4 square. 

    In more open games, like the Exchange Variation or Berlin Defense, especially where the Queens are already exchanged, the idea is far less likely to be viable, as White's main advantage in such cases is his heathy and mobile Kingside pawn majority opposing Black's crippled Queenside majority. 

    Unless there were some particular position where it was tactically good, allowing his pawns to be doubled leaving the "Vanished Center" with no center pawns for either side makes a sterile draw rather likely since the major pieces will tend to be traded on the open center files.

    In short, if there is some good reason to invite ...Bxf5 e4xf5, you should be able to see and explain it.  Otherwise, no, it is not going to be a good idea in most cases.

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #8

    moonnie

    The advantage of taking with the pawn is that you free the field e4. This is one of the most important squares for white in the Ruy Lopez. With preparation white will be able to move a knight of a bisschop there completly paralyzing black. 

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #9

    plutonia

    Thank you guys, Estragon thanks for the effort :)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    I reached this position, and while I was satisfied with the opening I didn't see a clear way to proceed. Here jumping immediately on f5, Bxf5 and exf5 I thought it didn't give me anything. The diagonal for my light squared bishop was blocked and e4 was not under my control.

     

    So I decided to remanouver the other knight to get a knight on f5 supported by the other knight.

    It was a OTB friendly game, but from memory it went like this. It was a nice game for me, but it really highlighted my shortcomings because I didn't really understand the position.

     

     



  • 3 months ago · Quote · #10

    Krishna21september

    the sharpest line is Ruy lopez - zaitsev variation. the 2 K's had played many an immortal games in this line


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