Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Is Chess a Game or War? ? ?


  • 6 months ago · Quote · #41

    DENVERHIGH

    millionairesdaughter wrote:       Chess is an illusion.

    Not when your are the one that will perish all alone in the field.

    Thanks for the comment and for reading it?

    DENVER

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #42

    imkan125

    Chess started as a pass time game for kings and soldiers and was invented in india, its original name was Chaturranga which means four types (referring to types of attacking pieces, it was developed during Gupta empire in india. Chatur mean four in ancient sanskrit. The modern pawn called mohra was simple foot soldier who would serve as cannon fodder in the game, the knight was horse rider warrior as horse played a very important role in ancient indian and central asian warfare (scythians, kambojas horse riders were admired in ancient india), the modern bishop was soldier on elephant, the modern queen was a male prime minister of the king. All of these were supposed to protect the king in the game just as they were supposed to do in real life. Rook was symbolizing chariot riders or soldiers on castle roof tops.

    The game then spread to ancient Persia and it is there that it developed the most , its name changed from Chaturrange to Shatranj. The King is called Shah in persian and when the king is defeated it was termed as Shah-maat , it means Shah or king has got defeated, which modified to modern word Checkmate as the game reached in europe. 

    The answer to the OP question is yes Chess was a game based on war and was only played by warrior or soldiers in ancient times, I doubt if normal peasant were even allowed to play chess in old times. Chess is a gift given by the indo-iranians to the world.

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #43

    evrgreek

    Nice bit of history imkan124.  I had previously thought  chess was created by a restauranteur looking to keep an eye on his waitstaff after the lunch shift!

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #44

    Litwitlou

    You are an excellent story teller, and that is the most important thing. No one can teach you that.  However, writers are almost always surprised that a bit of gentle editing can help. While changing little, if anything in the story, a fresh set of experienced eyes can punch up the work of any writer, no matter how great. Here's an example:

    I've taken a short section of your story and given a  demonstration of how editors work.  Before reading both as a whole, you might try it sentence by sentence. Read yours first, than the edited version of the sentence. Again with the second sentence, and so on.

    Your way:

    The response from the other army was subtle, but a tactical movement that could be seen. The mounted Knight made a move toward us on the far right and we responded to the far left. The knight unit moved up very fast, passing on my left to attack from the flank and support the center force.

    The knight is now located on C3. But from there he covers my area and can go in any direction where he decides  to go. 

    So much tension and fears are everyone’s mind. No comrade casualties yet. More movement of the attack came from behind me.

    I am glad they didn’t tell me to move forward yet. I know that when I go forward I can't retreat. Going backward for me is not in my vocabulary. I’m trained to go forward, attack, contain, threaten, capture, kill, and destroy the enemy. I hoped they did not kill me in turn.

    A flurry of movement is all around me as both armies were battling for ground and position. 

    Now the battle has begun and some expendable units are captured and removed fron the field of battle. They haven’t ordered me to move yet.  

    Internally I say to myself, "I’m wanting to move, just waiting is killing me. I want to do something to win the battle. I have confidence on my abilities."

    Finally, "Denver move up and support the forward units from behind."

    Just as I'm moving up to take my position, I see an enemy Knight take out the foot soldier the pawn on my right. I feel so bad for him. I just met him and didn't have a chance to know him.

    I get ready and poised to strike at the proper moment. 

     

    "Oh no. It's the Black Knight."


    Edited:

    The response from the other army was a subtle tactical movement we could see. The Knight charged toward our right and we moved to support our far left. The mounted warrior gained speed as he flanked us to support their center.

    The Knight, now on C3, has us covered and can wheel in any direction. Tension and fear grips our minds as attacks roll in from behind us.

    Thankfully, I haven't been ordered to advance yet. I know there's no retreat. Falling back is not in my vocabulary. I’m trained to go forward, attack, contain, threaten, capture, kill, and destroy the enemy. I hope to live through it.


    Furious movements surround me as both armies battle for ground and position. The battle rages and some expendable units are captured and removed fron the field. Still, I nervously, and somewhat impatiently, await orders to advance.

    I say to myself, "I want to move,  waiting is killing me. I want to do something to win the battle. I have confidence on my abilities."

    Finally, "Denver move up and support the forward units."

    As I'm moving up to take my position, I see an enemy Knight take out the the pawn on my right. I feel so bad for him. I just met him and didn't have a chance to know him.

    I am ready and poised to strike.

    "Oh, no! It's the Black Knight!"

    I hope this helps. BTW, Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland can be read and played as a chess game.

    Regards,
    Lou
  • 6 months ago · Quote · #45

    Abyssalix

    On the note of chess history, believe it or not, most arab players still refer to the pieces as Horse, rather than knight. Soldier rather than pawn, Elephant rider rather than bishop and finally, prime minister rather than queen.

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #46

    Sophiexxx

    Chess is not a sport? Uh :7

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #47

    evrgreek

    In many of the daily puzzles of late,  the  queen sac is the key move.  Oh, how my mind resists sacrificing the lovely queen!

    Long may she live… after all, what good is a king without his queen?

    The history of the game which has been explained so eloquently by others on this sight is quite a testament to cultural values and biases as well as traditions. The names of the pieces along with their images , silently reinforce notions.  

    A much better game is chess for me now that I know of the” conniving” entrance that bishops and knights have made into this game.

    As for the image on the bishop’s miter, the similarity in appearance of a cross and a sword dawns on me!

     

    As for the queen, I still say long may she live, but it is time for her to exit my game. The prime minister is much easier to throw under the bus!


Back to Top

Post your reply: