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Stuff Non-Chess Players Say


  • 4 days ago · Quote · #3381

    dragonair234

    camberfoil wrote:

    Purchase a B-2 Spirit? It costs the USAF $4,000,000,000 USD to build one. Fun Fact: They have their engines buried in the blended wing configuration to reduce heat siganture. Their radar signature is approximately the size of a baseball. Also, they only go about as fast as your average 747, as opposed to the supersonic speed capability of an F-22 that some believe it to possess.

    I'd be the first to admit that the B-2 visually looks awesome. But a few things concern me. It makes me sad to think where all of that funding (or even just half of it! A quarter!) could go to instead. How many people have the knowledge to fly this, then how many people are actually granted permission to fly it? What tiny fractions of percentages would we see? There seems to be a void to a definitive cost and benefit relationship of funding such things like this. 

  • 4 days ago · Quote · #3382

    camberfoil

    May I also add that the F-35 can accomplish much that the B-2 can at lower costs and much, much higher speeds, once Lockheed Martin fixes the fan discs.

  • 4 days ago · Quote · #3383

    dragonair234

    I used to play Crimson Skies (2002) on Xbox. You could fly a few different planes. It was kinda fun except I didn't really have anyone to play it with, so I was always playing the "CPU." lol   

  • 4 days ago · Quote · #3384

    camberfoil

    What kinds of planes were available?

  • 3 days ago · Quote · #3385

    akafett

    Are any of you familiar with the F-19 stealth fighter from the 1980's?

    If I'm not mistaken, it was the fighter the USAF developed as a means of supplying false info to hostile countries. The secrets of this new stealth fighter were purposefully leaked to mislead others in their developement of stealth technology, since the F-19 was not actually stealth and did not even fly. I am pretty sure the F-19 was the one used for this.

    Here's another one. Does anyone here know how old stealth technology really is? Take a guess. Then highlight the text below to see the answer.

    In WWII (that's right, World War II), radically new aircraft designs were experimented with and commonly called "Flying Wings."

  • 3 days ago · Quote · #3386

    camberfoil

    Flying wings, also known as "blended wings" or "tailless aircraft" were indeed tested as means of evading the then-crude radar. The only problem was their handling difficulty and inherent impaired stability caused by the lack of a vertical stabilizer. For those who don't know what a flying wing is, follow this link to a scene from Raiders of the Lost Ark (warning: dude + prop + viewer with weak stomach = vomit).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wtWJNMbJc30

  • 27 hours ago · Quote · #3387

    dragonair234

    ^I like your PIZZA badge Laughing I will get back to you in a few on the specific planes when I can get my hands on Crimson Skies. 

  • 27 hours ago · Quote · #3388

    dragonair234

    akafett wrote:

    Are any of you familiar with the F-19 stealth fighter from the 1980's?

    If I'm not mistaken, it was the fighter the USAF developed as a means of supplying false info to hostile countries. The secrets of this new stealth fighter were purposefully leaked to mislead others in their developement of stealth technology, since the F-19 was not actually stealth and did not even fly. I am pretty sure the F-19 was the one used for this.

    Here's another one. Does anyone here know how old stealth technology really is? Take a guess. Then highlight the text below to see the answer.

    * * * * * * * *

    OMG I was right! Okay, I didn't guess the specific years, but I guessed the correct century. Does that count, akafett? (-;

  • 21 hours ago · Quote · #3389

    akafett

    @ Dragon: Since it was before both of our time, yes I'll let it count for you.

  • 12 hours ago · Quote · #3390

    camberfoil

    I still think the SR-71 Blackbird was the best. Beach ball-sized radar signature, near-hypersonic supercruise (Mach 3+!), and its aesthetically-pleasing appearance (with those ramjet engines!), it's cooler than the B-2 and F-35.

  • 9 hours ago · Quote · #3391

    akafett

    @ Camber: Agreed.

  • 8 hours ago · Quote · #3392

    camberfoil

    Can anyone decipher why camberfoil is my username?

  • 5 hours ago · Quote · #3393

    akafett

    Related to aircraft parts, perhaps?

  • 4 hours ago · Quote · #3394

    kayak21

    camberfoil wrote:

    Can anyone decipher why camberfoil is my username?

    No. Frown

  • 4 hours ago · Quote · #3395

    camberfoil

    An aerodynamic camber refers to the asymmetry of the two halves of an airfoil. This asymmetry, at a certain speed, creates a differential in pressure which allows the wings to get lift, thus permittting flight.

  • 3 hours ago · Quote · #3396

    awesomechess1729

    camberfoil wrote:

    An aerodynamic camber refers to the asymmetry of the two halves of an airfoil. This asymmetry, at a certain speed, creates a differential in pressure which allows the wings to get lift, thus permittting flight.

    So would cambers differ between different planes? How is a camber measured?

  • 3 hours ago · Quote · #3397

    camberfoil

    Camber can differ from plane to plane. It all depends on how much lift the plane will require. A supercritical design, for example the one used on the 757, may differ from airfoil used on an A320. It depends on many factors, such as size, engine types/number/thrust, and efficiency goals.

  • 3 hours ago · Quote · #3398

    Steve212000

      

       

  • 3 hours ago · Quote · #3399

    colinsaul

    AH the Bernouli principle. Sorry if I spell it wrong.


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