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What is the total number of squares on chessboard?


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #41

    Bill_C

    And trying to make some fromt page drive in news.

    Working on our KNIGHT MOVES

    Cool

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #42

    waffllemaster

    Bill_C wrote:

    Man I thought memorizing the Knights Tour was enough. Now this takes chess obsession to a whole other level.

    corners 2 squares

    rim 3 squares

    2nd/7th ranks b/g files 4 squares

    3-6th ranks c-f files 8 squares

    4x2=8 3x24=72 (80) 20x4=80 (160) 16x8=128 (288)

    288 available moves yet only 64 squares.

    You're forgetting the sqaures that only have 6 possible moves!

    So instead of 3x24 I think you should have 8x24, the other 16 sqaures have 6 possible moves.

    So 4x2 + 8x3 + 20x4 + 16x8 + 16x6 = 336

    I guess that solves my mystery :p

    Here's the old picture I have on my computer:

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #43

    heinzie

    guitarzan wrote:

    Okay, okay, here's one:

    Think of the way a Knight moves (Bob Seger is heard in the background). Say it's all by itself on the chessboard, at a1. It can move from there to b3 or c2. If it were at a2, it could move to c1, c3, or or b4. If it were at a3, it could move to b1, c2, c4, or b5. I hope you're catching on. So the question becomes:

    What is the total of the available destinations for a Knight played from each of the 64 squares?

    you're forgetting to include (for the extra fun) checks, checkmates and captures and the different notations that arise when two (or more!) knights can jump to the same square *head spins*

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #44

    guitarzan

    waffllemaster wrote:

    I think I actually figured this out once... but I can't remember what the question was and I can't remember what this is the answer to... all I have written by knight is the number 336.  I have a number for each piece lol.

    Is this the answer?  I'm curious what 336 has to do with the knight and this may be it.

    Congrats! You were first, wafflemaster! 336 it is!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #45

    guitarzan

    Bill_C wrote:

    And trying to make some fromt page drive in news.

    Working on our KNIGHT MOVES

     

    Strange how the Knight moves ...

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #46

    Knightly_News

    alwaysGoingtoWIN wrote:

    Why are we even talking about this?

    Because intelligent creative people are like that.  Curious minds, trying to solve problems, investigate, observe, analyze.  People probably said the same thing about trig and calculus until masterpieces of engineering occured as a result of their power.  It was nerds scoping out mathematical relationships that developed some of the best tools mankind has.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #47

    guitarzan

    heinzie wrote:
    guitarzan wrote:

    Okay, okay, here's one:

    Think of the way a Knight moves (Bob Seger is heard in the background). Say it's all by itself on the chessboard, at a1. It can move from there to b3 or c2. If it were at a2, it could move to c1, c3, or or b4. If it were at a3, it could move to b1, c2, c4, or b5. I hope you're catching on. So the question becomes:

    What is the total of the available destinations for a Knight played from each of the 64 squares?

    you're forgetting to include (for the extra fun) checks, checkmates and captures and the different notations that arise when two (or more!) knights can jump to the same square *head spins*

    I can only be SO obsessed, heinzie! Maybe you can handle that one ;-)

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #48

    guitarzan

    reflectivist wrote:
    alwaysGoingtoWIN wrote:

    Why are we even talking about this?

    Because intelligent creative people are like that.  Curious minds, trying to solve problems, investigate, observe, analyze.  People probably said the same thing about trig and calculus until masterpieces of engineering occured as a result of their power.  It was nerds scoping out mathematical relationships that developed some of the best tools mankind has.

    Yeah! What he said :-P !

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #49

    alain978

    How about 68 squares? My friends and me tried a variation with standard board plus 4 "virtual squares", d0-e0-d9 and e9! We added 2 grasshoppers and 2 nightriders as fairy pieces. White grasshopper starts at d0 (behind the white queen), white nightrider starts at e0 (behind the white king), black grasshopper starts at d9 (behind the black queen and the black nightrider starts at e9 (behind the black king). It's only virtual square, once leaving its starting square the piece can't return back on it. A wild game and almost new one!!! Grasshopper is like a minor piece but the nightrider is a very strong one, almost as strong than the queen. Something to try...

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #50

    I-eat-guini-pigs

    TenyVarona wrote:

    Lol! at your age, you still have a lot of things to learn. Unless you are genius, you cannot derive the formula for this problem.

    Ok... I guess I will take that as a compliment... Its actually not that hard to be good at math you know. These things just come eisily to me...

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #51

    Live_For_Chess

    count.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #52

    billyblatt

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #53

    waynet

    Assuming squares can overlap, then = 204

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #54

    FanOfCarlsen

    I did not yet think about rectangles but it is very interesting question!


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