Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Puzzle hard


  • 4 years ago · Quote · #1

    chesswiz625

    I had posted this puzzle awhile ago...I wonder if everyone forgot about it...Anyway, I am going to post a position, and when the right move has been stated, I post the next position, until the puzzle is solved. (No quick solutions for all you lazy people.)

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #2

    Siwaranaba

    i think i found it.

    Bh3

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #3

    chesswiz625

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #4

    Siwaranaba

    i don't know, i give up

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #5

    chesswiz625

    Lol, well, it isn't easy, that's for sure. But black can win with mate in 5. (mate in 6 from the first position.)

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #6

    TomBarrister

    chesswiz625 wrote:

    Lol, well, it isn't easy, that's for sure. But black can win with mate in 5. (mate in 6 from the first position.)


    I don't even see a Black win in the position you posted, let alone a mate in 6.

     

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #7

    chesswiz625

    You are supposed to analyze the position in depth in order to know how to play the mate. I admit, white does have an escape in the initial position, but not after

    1. ... Bh3  2. bxc7?

    Here is the puzzle in its entirety. If you have any dignity though, you'll avoid using help feature.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #8

    NickYoung5

    This is a very cool puzzle. Did it arise in an actual game (if so, do you mind sharing). The initial position looks like it came from a KID Mar Del Plata game.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #9

    vaisakh1989s

    not much hard

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #10

    chesswiz625

    @ vaisakh1989s

    From the initial position, it would be fairly difficult to rationalize a queen sacrifice. With so much going on, the challenge would be "Can I mate his king?" If you aren't confident, you would not look for the mate, and therefore prepare to bunker in for a long endgame instead. The real question is, did you use the help feature, or solve it on your own?

     

    @NickYoung5

    The original game was "GM Lubomir Ftacnik - GM Ognjen Cvitan". Took place in Germany, 1997.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #11

    NickYoung5

    Found it, thanks!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #12

    NickYoung5

    Though doesn't 2. gxh3 save the game for white ?

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #13

    WilsonYiuWahWong

    Figured it out but its not an easy find if you don't calculate. If you realize the king can't escape, the tactic shouldn't be too hard to find. I don't play the KID so I wouldn't know how to place my pieces; Black's kingside pieces are all perfectly positioned to wreck the White king.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #14

    orangehonda

    Oh, I thought it was a (relatively) recent Nakamura game.

    Very nice queen sac, impressive to be able to spot it from the original position (I didn't), thanks for posting.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #15

    chesswiz625

    Yep. I wish the daily puzzle would use these types of puzzles, and not the annoying ones which are so obvious I see the solution in 5 seconds or less.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #16

    TomBarrister

    NickYoung5 wrote:

    Though doesn't 2. gxh3 save the game for white ?


    Yes.  2 gxh3 leaves White with the advantage.  It isn't a mate in anything, unless White plays badly.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #17

    chesswiz625

    TomBarrister wrote:
    NickYoung5 wrote:

    Though doesn't 2. gxh3 save the game for white ?


    Yes.  2 gxh3 leaves White with the advantage.  It isn't a mate in anything, unless White plays badly.


     OK guys, you gotta look into the position if you want to see. Black has the advantage after gxh3 (wins a rook and pawn for a bishop.)

    But yeah, it isn't mate yet, until the mistake of any move but the one you all just described. Still, it is a puzzle where black has the advantage, and after the second move, reanalyzing leads to a mate.
  • 4 years ago · Quote · #18

    TomBarrister

    Black does not have the advantage after 2 gxh3.  That's the point I'm trying to make.

    1 ... Bh3
    2 gxh3  Qxh3
    3 Rf2 gxf2
    4 Bxf2

    Black's attack is over.  While Black does have the Exchange for a pawn, White has powerful pawns on the Queenside that Black needs to do something about.

    4 ... cxb6

    Probably better is 4 ... axb6, 5 a6! Rxa6 (5 ... bxa6, 6 dxc7 with the double threat of Qd8+ and Qd5+) 6 Rxa6 bxa6, 7 dxc7 b5, 8 Qd8+ Rf8, 9 Nd6 Bf6, 10 c8=Q Qxc8, 11 Qxc8 Rxc8, 12 Nxc8, and White is up a piece for two pawns, and likely has a win.

    5 axb6 a6
    6 Bf1 Qc8

    The Queen is going to be harassed no matter where it goes. Moving it to e6 or d7 allows White to play Na4, followed by Nc5.

    7 Na4 Bf8

    Black tries to get the bad Bishop into the game.

    8 Rc1

    Or 8 Nc5

    8 ... Qd8
    9 Nc5  Qf6
    10 Qd5  Qg7

    Black defends the b-pawn.

    11 Bh3

    White gets his pieces into the game.

    11 ... Nf6
    12 Qd2  Kh8

    Getting rid of the Bishop pin at e6, but it won't help much.

    13 Bf5 Ne8

    Black can't stop everything.

    14 Bxg6 Qxg6
    15  Nxe5 Qf6
    16 Nxf7+ Qxf7 
    17  d7 Nd6
    18  e5

    Black can't avoid losing more material.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #19

    chesswiz625

    Well of course white wins in your case! Black just sits there moving his queen 80% of the time, and his king makes a pointless move as well. Just waiting for your opponent to slaughter you while you don't remobilize fails completely! The moves Qc8 and Kh8 I find especially troubling. Those just aren't good. Qe6 appears far more useful. Now, I am going to say I think black has the advantage, being 3 points up. Replace all those pointless queen moves with something good (black moving his kingside pieces over to the queenside) and I think you'll find white, at best, will pull off a draw (though I doubt it). Besides, if you disagree, you could always take it up with Grand Master Larry Evans! (I got the puzzle/analysis from his book The 10 Most Common Chess Mistakes.) I think his word is pretty creditable.

    "The only way to survive is to give up the exchange by 2.gxh3 Qxh3; 3.Rf2 gxf2; 4.Bxf2 and white must fight for a draw." (Evans 247)

    Still, you could post the position in the game analysis section as well and see what the load of other members think.


Back to Top

Post your reply: