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Karjakin & Caruana Lead In Tashkent

  • SonofPearl
  • on 11/29/12, 11:06 AM.

Tashkent Grand Prix 2012 banner.jpg

Sergey Karjakin defeated the early leader Alexander Morozevich in round 7 of the Tashkent Grand Prix to take the lead.

Morozevich was struggling to hold on for a draw in a rook endgame, when he erred with 52...Rc7+?? which allowed Karjakin to answer with the brilliant 53. Rc6!!

Morozevich played on, but the results was never in doubt after that stunning move.

Sharing the lead at the top of the standings is Fabiano Caruana who defeated Leinier Dominguez with the black pieces in the only other decisive game of the day.

Sergey Karjakin deposed the early leader Alexander Morozevich

2012 Tashkent Grand Prix Round 7 Sergey Karjakin.jpg

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Leinier Dominguez lost to Fabiano Caruana to lie last in the standings

2012 Tashkent Grand Prix Round 7 Leinier Dominguez.jpg

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Wang Hao and Peter Svidler drew their game

2012 Tashkent Grand Prix Round 7 Wang Hao Peter Svidler.jpg

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Rustam Kasimdzhanov drew with Peter Leko

2012 Tashkent Grand Prix Round 7 Rustam Kasimdzhanov Peter Leko.jpg

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Ruslan Ponomariov drew his game against Boris Gelfand

2012 Tashkent Grand Prix Round 7 Ruslan Ponomariov.jpg

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Shakhriyar Mamedyarov drew with Gata Kamsky

2012 Tashkent Grand Prix Round 7 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov.jpg

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The standings after round seven

Name Fed Elo Pts
Karjakin, Sergey  RUS 2775
Caruana, Fabiano  ITA 2786
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar  AZE 2764 4
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam  UZB 2696 4
Morozevich, Alexander  RUS 2748 4
Ponomariov, Ruslan  UKR 2741
Svidler, Peter  RUS 2747
Leko, Peter  HUN 2732
Wang, Hao  CHN 2737
Gelfand, Boris  ISR 2751
Kamsky, Gata  USA 2762
Dominguez Perez, Leinier  CUB 2726 2

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Games start at 14:00 local time in Tashkent (09:00 UTC) except the final round which is 2 hours earlier. Live video coverage and commentary is available at the official website.

The time control is 40 moves in 2 hours, followed by 20 moves in 1 hour, then 15 minutes plus a 30 second increment after move 60.

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The Tashkent Grand Prix Schedule

21/11/2012 Arrival & Opening
22/11/2012 Round 1
23/11/2012 Round 2
24/11/2012 Round 3
25/11/2012 Round 4
26/11/2012 Free Day
27/11/2012 Round 5
28/11/2012 Round 6
29/11/2012 Round 7
30/11/2012 Round 8
01/12/2012 Free Day
02/12/2012 Round 9
03/12/2012 Round 10
04/12/2012 Round 11 & Closing
05/12/2012 Departure

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The overall winner and runner-up of the 2012/13 FIDE Grand Prix will qualify for the March 2014 Candidates Tournament.  Before then, we are due to have the 2013 Candidates in March 2013 in London, with the winner challenging Vishy Anand for the title in October/November 2013.

Photos by Anastasiya Karlovich and Bakhtiyor Jiyanov at the official website.  Games via TWIC.

4264 reads 24 comments
3 votes

Comments


  • 21 months ago

    JBades6310

    I agree with you that really this is just a debate about the definition of what constitutes a blunder or brilliancy. I guess the way I saw it was that the move that comes before a brilliancy in a computer analysis or engine would be marked as a blunder with (??), but I do see your point.

  • 21 months ago

    MaartenSmit

    That's exactly the point. If a move is a blunder, that means (by definition) that the correct response, the winning follow-up for the opponent, is an obvious one, therefore not a brilliancy.

    Obviously it's a matter of definition and people can have different opinions on whether a move qualifies as a blunder or a brilliancy, but I've always learned that a blunder can never be followed up by a brilliancy. And it makes sense to me.

  • 21 months ago

    JBades6310

    I don't understand what you don't understand about the fact that !! always follows a ?? because one blundered by not seeing the brilliancy. To me this is an obvious argument.

  • 21 months ago

    MaartenSmit

    Can't believe people are making a big deal out of this...

    Alright. A blunder is (quoting wikipedia here) "a very bad move. It is usually caused by some tactical oversight, whether from time trouble, overconfidence or carelessness." That also means that it is something the player making the blunder would not under normal circumstances make that move. That's because the refutation to the blunder is so obvious to both players, that that refutation cannot be a brilliancy.

  • 21 months ago

    Baldvin

    Maartensmit: A player can play a truly great and inspiring move after his opponent blunders. With that said, i see absolutely no reason why a terrible move ( ?? ) cannot be followed by a godly move ( !! ). If you disagree please elaborate.

  • 21 months ago

    Firula

    @ptrckmackay: I agree with what u said except for 1 sentence:

    "Also, a move is only a blunder if your adversary takes advantage of the weak move."    -ptrckmackay

    So if i hang my queen and my opponent doesnt take advantage, I didn't blunder? When i review that game I'm gonna say man that was a dumb move.

  • 21 months ago

    JBades6310

    yeah I'd like to see what that puzzle's rating would end up as Smile

  • 21 months ago

    P_G_M

    I'm certain that both MaartenSmit and bogdan1001 would have missed the 53.Rc6!!! if they would have been playing the white pieces Laughing

    I followed this game live through Chessdom.com and 52.Kc4 was showed as red move (weak move) by Houdini and the "correct move" suggested by Houdini was 52.Ke3 or Ke2 which is followed by the obvious and natural move 52...bxa which leads to a draw. The Houdini's move had zero winning chances for Karjakin.

    What most players nowdays do not understand is that chess is played between humans that have emotions and who play questionable moves that are based on the expectation that the human adversary might overlook a tactical motif, specially on time pressure. This is part of what is known as the psychology of chess and there are many books on this subject.

    The brilliancy on this game was the fact that Karjakin saw the possibility that if he played 52.Kc4 that maybe Morozevich, who had only a few minutes left to reach the second time control, would blunder by playing the natural looking move 52...Rc7+? which provided the opportunity for the winning move 53.Rc6!!!

    It was the only possible way for Karjakin to win this game, he thought a long time before moving Kc4, and his plan worked because Morozevich fall into the swindle. 

    Also, a move is only a blunder if your adversary takes advantage of the weak move.

    Mamedyarov blundered in move 58.Rg6 just to have Kamsky return the favor two moves later with 59...Ke3. Of course is easy to me to mention this because I was following the game live in Chessdom.com with the analysis of Houdini who never gets tired and neither feels any time pressure, or feels the pressure that builds after having playing for several hours.  

    The position from Karjakin's game should be included in the Tactics Trainer as an interference sacrifice Laughing

    Have the computer move 52...Rc7+? and then we need to find 53.Rc6!!! then the computer moves 53...bxR and then we need to find 54.b6 and this is the end of the puzzle.

  • 21 months ago

    JBades6310

    I'm just saying that any time one writes !! it always means that there was a ?? before it. but I can see the argument from both sides

  • 21 months ago

    salvyo

    gg caruana

  • 21 months ago

    zenious

    The move is amazing and unexpected. Has all the specifications for 2 exclamation marks.

  • 21 months ago

    bogdan1001

    @MaartenSmit: the only place for ! is after ? ... :)

  • 21 months ago

    macrosgambit

    Fantastic scandinavian from Caruana!

  • 21 months ago

    MaartenSmit

    @bogdan1001: If you want to view it that way, fine. But then exclamation marks don't exist anymore in your analysis ;)

    @SonofPearl: Yeah, I understand. It just stood out to me, that's all.

  • 21 months ago

    SonofPearl

    @ MaartenSmit - I'm aware of that, but this is a news column, not a piece of rigorous analysis, and I felt that such an aesthetically pleasing move deserved some praise.

  • 21 months ago

    bogdan1001

    But opening the door for your opponent to make a !! on the following move can only be described as a blunder, right? So here is my next conjecture: In chess there are no brilliancies, only blunders.

  • 21 months ago

    Firula

    @MaartenSmit: Exactly. How is it a blunder if it takes a spectacular (!!) move for the opponent to gain an advantage?

  • 21 months ago

    MaartenSmit

    It's an analytical flaw. The winning move after a blunder is never a brilliancy, and the move before a brilliancy can never be a blunder.

  • 21 months ago

    JBades6310

    why never follow up a ?? with a !! - wouldn't the advice be the opposite? always do it when you get the chance imo

  • 21 months ago

    Lawdoginator

    Come on, Caruana!  Win this thing!  

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