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Nakamura Wins Tata Steel 2011

  • SonofPearl
  • on 1/30/11, 12:54 PM.

Hikaru Nakamura has won the 2011 Tata Steel tournament, surely the best tournament result from an American since Bobby Fischer graced the 64 squares many decades ago.

In the best result of his career, Nakamura finished with a tremendous +5 score, beating a world class field which included the top four ranked players in the world; Carlsen, Anand, Aronian and Kramnik.

Quoted at the official website, Nakamura gave his reaction:

“I was sort of jumping up and down around the room. I was so happy. Winning a tournament is always nice but winning an elite tournament like this is something completely different. I cannot remember the last time an American won a major tournament. I hope my victory will make for greater interest in chess back home in the States.”

“I have become more serious about chess. No more 2.Qh5, no more crazy openings for me. My results have improved. Hopefully, I can keep it going. I hope to break 2800 by the end of this year,”

In the final round Nakamura achieved an early draw against Wang Hao, which left Vishy Anand trying to win his game against Nepomniachtchi to share first place.  However, Nepo managed to establish an unusual blockade to keep Anand at bay and ensure the Indian had to settle for second place.

With all the other Group A games also ending all-square, Carlsen and Aronian finished with a share of third place in what has been an event filled with lots of fighting chess in all three groups.

Luke McShane drew a hard fought final round game with co-leader Navara and is the winner of Group B by virtue of a superior tie-break score.  Both McShane and Navara will be invited to participate in the A Group next year.

In Group C, Daniele Vocaturo also held on in a thrilling game with leadership rival Illya Nyzhnyk to earn the draw he needed to claim first place and an invite to Group B in 2012.

Nakamura won €10,000 euros for first place in the A Group, which seems a rather modest reward for his efforts but all the players also receive appearance money (the amounts are not disclosed).  Mcshane and Navara share €5,500 and Vocaturo gets €1,000.

Nakamura earns a final round draw against Wang Hao...

Hao_Naka_Rd13.jpg

 

 

...and Nepo escapes against Anand to prevent the world champion from sharing first place

Nepo_Anand_Rd13.jpg

 

 

A determined McShane holds Navara to a draw to take first place in Group B

Navara_McShane_Rd13.jpg

 

 

A thrilling end in Group C as Vocaturo hangs on for a draw to take first place

Illya Nyzhnyk_Vocaturo_rd13.jpg

 

 

All the final round games can be found at the official website www.tatasteelchess.com

The final-round results and final standings:

Group A

Aronian, Levon ½-½ Smeets, Jan
Kramnik, Vladimir ½-½ Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime
Giri, Anish ½-½ Ponomariov, Ruslan
Nepomniachtchi, Ian ½-½ Anand, Viswanathan
Wang, Hao ½-½ Nakamura, Hikaru
Grischuk, Alexander ½-½ Carlsen, Magnus
Shirov, Alexei ½-½ L'Ami, Erwin
Group B

Navara, David ½-½ McShane, Luke J
Efimenko, Zahar ½-½ Sargissian, Gabriel
So, Wesley ½-½ Wojtaszek, Radoslaw
Li, Chao 1-0 Tkachiev, Vladislav
Ganguly, Surya Shekhar ½-½ Le, Quang Liem
Spoelman, Wouter 1-0 Nijboer, Friso
Hammer, Jon Ludvig 0-1 Fressinet, Laurent
Group C

Vocaturo, Daniele ½-½ Nyzhnyk, Illya
Bluvshtein, Mark 1-0 Ivanisevic, Ivan
Kazhgaleyev, Murtas ½-½ Swiercz, Dariusz
Tania, Sachdev 0-1 Siebrecht, Sebastian
Van Kampen, Robin ½-½ Bok, Benjamin
Pruijssers, Roeland 0-1 Van Der Werf, Mark
De Jong, Jan-Willem 0-1 Lahno, Kateryna

 


Group A
















1 Nakamura, Hikaru USA 2751 * ½ 0 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 1 9
2 Anand, Viswanathan IND 2810 ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1
3 Carlsen, Magnus NOR 2814 1 ½ * ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 8
4 Aronian, Levon ARM 2805 ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 8
5 Kramnik, Vladimir RUS 2784 ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1
6 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime FRA 2715 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 1
7 Giri, Anish NED 2686 ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ * ½ 0 1 ½ ½ ½ ½
8 Ponomariov, Ruslan UKR 2744 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ * ½ 0 1 ½ 1 ½
9 Nepomniachtchi, Ian RUS 2733 0 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 1 ½ * 1 ½ ½ 0 ½ 6
10 Wang, Hao CHN 2731 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 1 0 * 1 1 ½ ½ 6
11 Grischuk, Alexander RUS 2773 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 * ½ 1 0
12 L'Ami, Erwin NED 2628 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ ½
13 Smeets, Jan NED 2662 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 0 ½ * 1
14 Shirov, Alexei ESP 2722 0 0 ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 0 * 4

Group B
















1 McShane, Luke J ENG 2664 * ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ ½
2 Navara, David CZE 2708 ½ * 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1
3 Efimenko, Zahar UKR 2701 1 1 * ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 8
4 Le, Quang Liem VIE 2664 1 ½ ½ * ½ 1 ½ 0 0 1 ½ 0 1 1
5 So, Wesley PHI 2673 0 1 ½ ½ * ½ ½ ½ 0 1 1 1 ½ ½
6 Sargissian, Gabriel ARM 2667 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1
7 Tkachiev, Vladislav FRA 2636 0 0 1 ½ ½ ½ * ½ 0 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 7
8 Wojtaszek, Radoslaw POL 2726 0 0 ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ * 1 1 0 ½ ½ 1
9 Li, Chao CHN 2649 0 0 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 0 * 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 6
10 Fressinet, Laurent FRA 2707 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 1 * 1 0 1 ½ 6
11 Ganguly, Surya Shekhar IND 2651 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 1 ½ 0 * 1 1 1
12 Spoelman, Wouter NED 2547 0 0 0 1 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 1 0 * 0 1 5
13 Hammer, Jon Ludvig NOR 2647 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 0 0 1 * ½ 4
14 Nijboer, Friso NED 2584 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ *

Group C
















1 Vocaturo, Daniele ITA 2570 * ½ 1 0 0 1 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 1 1 9
2 Nyzhnyk, Illya UKR 2530 ½ * ½ 0 0 ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½
3 Lahno, Kateryna UKR 2518 0 ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 1 0 ½ 1 1 8
4 Ivanisevic, Ivan SRB 2630 1 1 ½ * ½ 0 ½ 1 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1
5 Swiercz, Dariusz POL 2540 1 1 ½ ½ * 0 ½ 0 0 1 0 1 1 1
6 Bluvshtein, Mark CAN 2590 0 ½ ½ 1 1 * 0 0 1 1 ½ 1 0 1
7 Kazhgaleyev, Murtas KAZ 2637 0 0 ½ ½ ½ 1 * 0 1 0 1 1 ½ 1 7
8 Bok, Benjamin NED 2453 ½ 0 0 0 1 1 1 * ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0
9 Tania, Sachdev IND 2391 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 ½ * 0 1 ½ ½ 1
10 Siebrecht, Sebastian GER 2439 0 0 0 ½ 0 0 1 ½ 1 * 1 1 ½ 0
11 Van Der Werf, Mark NED 2439 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 * 0 1 0 5
12 Van Kampen, Robin NED 2443 0 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ ½ 0 1 * ½ 1
13 Pruijssers, Roeland NED 2484 0 0 0 ½ 0 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 ½ * ½ 4
14 De Jong, Jan-Willem NED 2437 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 ½ * 4

 

We hope you have enjoyed all the Chess.com coverage of this fantastic event!

16051 reads 99 comments
5 votes

Comments


  • 4 years ago

    abran516

    Acedearler just joined in and wanted to play this rare american game

  • 4 years ago

    restinpeace

    Congratulations GM Nakamura you're the man, what happened to my bet GM Aronian :) LOL, and a warm congratulations too to GM So even though you're not a winner of the group B, you are still the winner in our hearts of fellow countrymen.

  • 4 years ago

    jhb701

    nakamura's se ond is kris littlejohn. His mother posted an interesting article that references how they prepare for tournaments! http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/geekend/the-role-of-computers-in-planning-chess-strategy/4211
  • 4 years ago

    JP3

    32... kings takes rook is a draw not a win

  • 4 years ago

    JP3

    hey can some one help me in the game of Vocaturo, Daniele (2570) vs. Nyzhnyk, Illya (2530 at move 30....Nf6 can be a win for black

  • 4 years ago

    SonofPearl

    Regarding Topalov, the tournament director Jeroen van den Berg is quoted by Chess In Translation as saying:

    "We invited Anand and Topalov before the start of the World Championship Match in Sofia. The result wasn’t yet known so we offered them identical conditions. Anand agreed immediately, while Topalov’s manager Danailov said: “No”. He wanted better conditions. Then the match took place and we didn’t come to an agreement with Topalov’s manager."

  • 4 years ago

    SonofPearl

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 4 years ago

    MrGame

    nakamura aronian and carlsen are gonna try to wrestle the title from anand as soon as they get a chance

  • 4 years ago

    randomfischer

    Topalov is probably preparing for his match with Kamsky, as they are scheduled to play as part of the candidates matches for the right to play Anand

  • 4 years ago

    PhilipN

    As for why Topalov and Ivanchuk were not here:  I don't know about Topalov, but Ivanchuk was participating in Gibraltar.

  • 4 years ago

    ivanx00

    randomfisher: You bring an excellent point that to be sincere, I had not realized. I totally agree that we should look at Nakamuras performance in its own merit and not compare to any other player.

     

    Aside from Naka's awesome performance, I was also impressed on Magnus on and off performance during the tournament. Could it be that Magnus has been drinking from the 'overconfidence' juice lately??

     

    Also, does anyone know why Topalov and Ivanchuck where not in this tournament?

  • 4 years ago

    rumi99

    good

  • 4 years ago

    randomfischer

    While I like Nakamura and enjoy his success, I am really turned off by more resurrection of Bobby Fischer in regards to Nakamura on this site.  Let's let Nakamura flourish of his own style and strength at his pace, just support him without any 'Fischer' analagies. I think this kind of well wishing is ultimately harmful to a top player like Nakamura, and is boring to constantly here over and over again. Fischer has been drummed into us for sooo long it is repulsive. Don't take me wrong, I love fischer's games and have studied him since 1978 when I began to play chess. It's just this 'go USA' thing, and Fischer is the best or was the best, etc, WTF, who cares? We don't know who is "best", best at what?, bithcing about the lighting conditions at a tournament? Bitching about the Russians? Just play your best, try to improve and let chess be free of rampant nationalism, and let Fischer finally die, like let him rest.

  • 4 years ago

    bulletchess4fun

    Hikaru!!!!  

  • 4 years ago

    Nimzoblanca

    Nice Job. 

  • 4 years ago

    capareti

    (hey can some one help me in the game of Vocaturo, Daniele (2570) vs. Nyzhnyk, Illya (2530 at move 30....Nf6 can be a win for black)

    32....King takes Rook is already a win for Black.

  • 4 years ago

    sputnick

    Kamsky won the World Cup in 2007. Nakamura should not say he can't recall when an American last won a major tournament. It makes him look ungracious, which he may very well be.

  • 4 years ago

    sryiwannadraw

    Good games! Congrats American!

  • 4 years ago

    capareti

    (Wesley needs help like a sponsor who can make his expenses in training alleviate. He has to stay in a place (outside Phil) where opportunities of playing against better players are available anytime (tournaments everywhere). With a good trainer and exposure to actual play, he will greatly improve. Good luck Wes!!!)

    I think it is not so much of the training, the kid is wonderful in his games. What he has to have is to battle against himself, he was just too anxious/or excited/ or some little fear against certain opponents/ particular opponents, like an asian will likely beat an asian.  So better for him is to control emotions generally.  If he fights that then he can be a candidate to the WC one day.  It's totally different when you were playing as a kid and being a grown up fellow now.  Good luck to Wesley,, it's not the end of the road.. Go Wesly Go.

  • 4 years ago

    capareti

    winning the tata steel is just like winning the World Championship.  

    A very wonderful stepping stone for Hik.  We are proud of you !!! 

    I hope you will not change, I mean don't be like Bobby.

     

    *** To the Filipino Wesley So, you have plenty of time to reorganize your style. 

     I think you have to have a psychological manager to handle with your "game excitement or confusion".  

    I could clearly see it that, you wanted to move this, but instead moved that, it is clearly in your game,

     that was why you lost in Tata's crucial leadership run.  You can be a Champion one day.  Recuperate your nerves. 

     But anyway , my congratulations !!!! Chess is getting bigger and heavier with your presence guys !!!!

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