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Official Statement on the Ivanov Story

  • PeterDoggers
  • on 12/11/13, 3:57 AM.

The organizers of the Navalmoral de la Mata tournament have issued a statement on what exactly happened with Borislav Ivanov, a story Chess.com reported on earlier this week. Because it answers several of the questions that were raised, we deem it prudent to give the statement below in full:

CLUB MORALO DE AJEDREZ
C/ Calvo Sotelo, 53
10300 Navalmoral de la Mata (Cáceres)

PRESS RELEASE

In view of the impact that the presence of the player Borislav Ivanov in recent XIX

OPEN INTERNACIONAL DE AJEDREZ DE NAVALMORAL DE LA MATA - XI PREMIO

CENTRAL NUCLEAR DE ALMARAZ, and due to the information published, which has sometimes been inaccurate, we issue this press release to try to cast light on this episode. This is no judgement of value. We'll just stick to a faithful narration of what happened and the insight of some people involved. Let everyone draw their own conclusions.”

1. The full participant list, including Mr. Borislav Ivanov, was published before the start of the tournament. The organizers did not receive any official statement against his taking part in the event.

2. The first day of the tournament some players, especially Grand Masters, verbally stated their disagreement with Borislav Ivanov's presence. They were advised to file a written complaint, but none of them did.

3. Once the tournament started, in view that other players were becoming more and more suspicious and in order to clear any existing doubts, the organizers proceeded to examine Borislav Ivanov's shoes at the end of round 4 and before he could leave the playing hall. It was widely remarked that a hidden device could be placed inside his footwear.

4. Player Borislav Ivanov willingly consented, so he was escorted to a private area in the hotel and, in front of two members of the organizing team, he was requested to take off his shoes, which he did. His footwear was thoroughly examined and nothing out of the ordinary was detected. He was examined as well, using a mobile app for metal detecting. We don't know exactly how reliable and accurate that app is, but nothing was found that could imply the existence of a hidden device inside his footwear.

5. Once this inspection finished, Borislav Ivanov motioned to take off his pants as well, as he asked the organizers if he should go on stripping. Since all complaints had focused only on his shoes, organizers decided not to go further.

6. During round 5, one of the participants in the tournament, Mr. Andrés

Holgado Maestre, noticed a suspicious bump on Mr. Ivanov's back (the Bulgarian played with his coat and scarf on, though the heating was working in the playing hall). This suspicious bump was noticed by other participants as well, and was reported to the chief arbiter. He deemed it untimely to interrupt the game in that moment. After the game, in a very tense atmosphere, Mr

Andrés Holgado Maestre suddenly took a hold of the bump on Mr Ivanov's back through his clothes, and pulling, asked him (in Spanish) what was hidden on his back. Mr. Ivanov gave some answer in Bulgarian. Then Mr. Holgado accused Mr Ivanov of cheating (in English) and requested help from other participants watching the scene, to find out what Mr. Ivanov was hiding. No-one helped him though, so he let Mr. Ivanov go and the Bulgarian player promptly left the playing hall.

7. Mr Holgado states he could touch an oblong object, similar to an mp3 player, attached to Mr. Ivanov's body.

8. The following day, moments before the start of round 6, it was Mr. Ivanov's opponent Mr. Namig Guliyev who verbally requested to the arbiter and the tournament director a new examination to Mr.

Ivanov.

9. Mr. Ivanov was asked if he was willing to undergo a new search, and he agreed, while he remarked it was odd to do it before the round and not after it. In contrast with the previous search, this time Mr. Ivanov was visibly nervous, according to one of the organizers.

10. The search was carried out in the same place as before. Mr. Ivanov stated he wouldn't strip and his opponent Mr. Guliyev, who was there as well, stated there was no need for a full striptease, just to show he had nothing to hide. Then, Mr. Guliyev emptied his own pockets and felt his own body showing there was nothing odd, and he even lifted the tight sweater he was wearing, allowing his shirt to be seen. Mr. Ivanov consented to take off only his coat and his scarf. Then Mr. Guliyev was requested to leave the room and just two members of the organizing team stayed with Mr. Ivanov.

11. Mr. Ivanov took off his coat and scarf and then a more thorough examination (frisking) was suggested. He willingly consented. In order to safeguard Mr. Ivanov's privacy, the tournament director Mr. Juan Antonio Sánchez

Bermejo (a retired policemen with a long experience) stayed alone with Mr.

Ivanov and frisked him.

12. He started with the hair, neck and shoulders. When he felt his chest, though, Mr. Ivanov dodged back. However, before Mr. Ivanov avoided contact, Mr. Bermejo could feel something odd near his left armpit, but couldn't say exactly what. Perhaps because of Mr. Ivanov's rushed movement unfastened one of his shirt's buttons, and a kind of strap could be seen crossing his chest from side to side. When asked what was under his shirt, Mr. Ivanov insisted he had nothing. Then Mr. Ivanov refused to go on and he was warned that in that case he could be expelled from the tournament. However, that was unnecessary because Mr. Ivanov stated he would willingly leave, but he requested the entry fee was refunded, as he didn't have enough money to leave.

13. In view that Mr. Ivanov was in dire straits, Mr. Bermejo decided, on a personal basis, to give Mr. Ivanov 50 € from his own pocket, as an act of kindness, not as a compensation of any kind.

14. The tournament organizers believe to have respected at all times current Spanish laws, since all searches were carried out with the prior permission of Mr. Ivanov.

Navalmoral de la Mata, 11 December 2013

Translation into English thanks to Patricia Llaneza.

20209 reads 121 comments
18 votes

Comments


  • 9 months ago

    fdimul

    Bring Ivanov back and make him to play Magnus

  • 9 months ago

    malambot

    this is unfair to Boris Ivanov. What a pity. 

  • 9 months ago

    LegoPirateSenior

    I don't recall anyone mentioning this yet around here: two weeks ago, Bulgarian Chess Federation expelled Ivanov from their ranks.

    See FIDE's position in respect of the Ivanov case, last paragraph.

  • 9 months ago

    Narendhranath

    I_broke_bad 

    Good one :)

  • 9 months ago

    austria55

    In order to avoid incidences like this one, FIDE will have to establish strict rules governing the use of electronic or mechanical devices during tournament play  and organizers of tournaments should have the right to conduct checks, controls (body searches if necessary or at a random basis) for the purpose of detection of such devices. Any player (and their coaches) who participates in FIDE sanctioned tournaments should have to sign a consent before the tournament in which he or she participates, begins that he or she could be subject to a random check, control. This will greatly reduce the possibility for players (and their coaches)  to cheat. Violation of these rules should be resulting in a ban of the player (or coaches) participating in such tourneys for a number of years.

  • 9 months ago

    rav1ndra

    secondly: let's allow to play Borislav until we will have a hard proof (or not), which might help us in similar cases in the future. Innocent

  • 9 months ago

    Cezary

    firstly: some standard and humanitary searching/clearing method  for players should be established (by rules of FIDE), and then respected - at the moment it is humiliation and shame only; Embarassed

    secondly: let's allow to play Borislav until we will have a hard proof (or not), which might help us in similar cases in the future. Innocent

  • 9 months ago

    bmws88

    FIDE: lifetime ban for Ivanov please. Who is with me? 

  • 9 months ago

    I_broke_bad

    Reading through these posts it really reminds me of this :D

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrzMhU_4m-g

     

    http://www.snotr.com/video/8571/She_s_a_witch

  • 9 months ago

    malambot

    Maybe all players should have been frisked to be fair.lol

  • 9 months ago

    Twobit

    " Mr. Holgado accused Mr Ivanov of cheating (in English) and requested help from other participants watching the scene...No-one helped him though, so he let Mr. Ivanov go..." This had to be an odd scene...

  • 9 months ago

    fdimul

    The only thing I can guess is he is a born computer chip installed boy and people are afraid to play and lose to him seeing his super talent.

    Maybe Magnus Carlsun is nothing before him if given a chance.  But Magnus Carlsun too may shun to play with him and lose his title in the end.

  • 9 months ago

    rav1ndra

    seeing is believing....i don't believe he do cheating. if we make a vote, much more they who don't believe than to those who do i guess, so it's kinda a human nature. What about FIDE...do they believe in a story without a fact?

  • 9 months ago

    Muriustar

    @Zinsch That Borislav is a shy hunchback with a fetish for wearing a bra when he plays chess is a better explanation.

    Explains the extra 50€ better...

  • 9 months ago

    OldChessDog

    If this doesn't confirm the suspicions of cheating, than nothing will.

  • 9 months ago

    Zinsch

    @rally_media: Please respect the facts: there is a scientific article out there claiming that the chances of a 2700 rated player achieving the high correlation to computer moves that Ivanov has shown in his infamous 9-game tournament previously, are about 1500:1. Let alone a player with the rating of Ivanov.

    Now, at this tournament, the tournament director and retired police man says that he frisked Ivanov and saw a strap under his shirt, felt something weird, and that Ivanov was nervous and stopped the examination. There is no reason to discredit this statement (like a court that usually believes statements of neutral police officers).

    All evidence put together, there is no doubt in my mind that Ivanov did in fact cheat.

  • 9 months ago

    Muriustar

    34769 reads for the two last news items (together) on Borislav. Everybody loves him!

  • 9 months ago

    rav1ndra

    i love this....from Marcokim

    It's not easy to cheating with device...

    Non of these bungling organizers are helping the situation. Losing GMs and IMs are not an objective source of evidence. So lets go back to pure logic. How can he do it efficiently and consistently, it just doesn't make sense.

    Lets take the exampe that he is playing black:

    1. He has to relay his oponents move thru a hidden divice to an external engine. (he has to code this outgoing move and send it)

    2. The external engine has to relay the reply to him thru his hidden device. (he has to uncode this incoming move)

    3. The relaying device has to have some sort of open connection to the host. I am guessing the host can't be far away.

    4. He has to have an accomplices to do this, one needs at least one layer of redundancy in case of coding/uncoding errors you can ask the guy to redo it. An accomplice will need transport, hotel, food and daily allowance - this costs money.

    a) Either this guy could be testing equipment and espionage methods for another entity. The motivation here being money - plain and simple. 

    b) or just a poor guy who is unfairly targeted - but given the humiliation suffered I would rather quit chess.

  • 9 months ago

    dualcount

    Just look at some of his pawn sacs in one of the tournament games; even Calrsen could not calculate this deep.....this guy is like a kleptomaniac....he needs help.....

  • 9 months ago

    Muriustar

    Also he has smelly feet (refused to take his shoes once), skinny arms (see pictures), is a potential hunchback (doesn't like anyone to touch his lump) and does some kinky things with his nipples and tape.

    An easy target for evil GMs... I wish they would stop picking on him, they can't do anything that life did not already do to him.

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