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  • 7 weeks ago

    ongoingprocess

    On Sunday July 12, 2015 I watched this video. I enjoyed learning about open and closed positions. Thank you so much for this video.

  • 4 months ago

    IM dpruess

    hi aboyer, taking notes might help one person to review and absorb the material. watching the video twice might help someone else. quizzing yourself after watching it could help. depends partly on the person. i've usually found for myself that doing some related puzzles or trying to teach the material to another person has been one of the best ways for me to make new chess knowledge stick.

    obviously, this video doesn't come with a quizz or problem set, but you can use your ingenuity to quiz yourself if that's something you're into. for ex, take the position at move 10 of a bunch of your games, and ask yourself: is this a closed, open, semi-open, or fluid position? then ask someone else, see if you agree, and why. you can come up with stuff like that for all the material covered in these videos.

    hope that helps :-)

  • 4 months ago

    Mal_Smith

    Suggest people asking for notes and bullet points have a go at making them. It's a time consuming business, and you can't really expect David to provide them for all the lectures. I'd be glad to have a go at producing notes for one lecture, to start with, if others are willing to tackle other lectures. 

  • 5 months ago

    dempsey123

    Great Lesson!  Your videos are terrific!

  • 5 months ago

    aboyer669

    Hi David,I would really like to excel and get better. I was wondering if taking notes would be a good idea, and what kind of techniques have the best efficacy. Great videos and thank you

  • 5 months ago

    hxsss

    AWSOME, very helpful. I am a state champion but it's always good to review and look at others knowledge.

    😺

  • 8 months ago

    eddy4zheng

    Thanks!

    EDDY4ZHENG

  • 12 months ago

    IM dpruess

    i care :)

    thanks!

  • 12 months ago

    mcleodjeff

    David, that really helps. Thank you so much for your generous explaination. I have to say, I'm really impressed that you respond to every comment here, especially with such timeliness. You are a true ambassador!

  • 12 months ago

    IM dpruess

    Open/Closed has to do with whether there are open lines for the pieces: files for the rooks and queen, diagonals for the bishops and queen. Trading pawns "opens" a position, and locking pawns "closes" a position.

    Typically 2 pawn trades creates an open position. 3, 4, or 5 pawn trades makes a *more* open position.

    A closed position should not only not have pawn trades, it should have a couple pawns already "locked," meaning up against each other where they can no longer trade.

    Many positions with 1 pawn trade are called "semi-open," because they don't really play like open positions or like closed positions, they are in between.

    hope that helps :)

  • 12 months ago

    mcleodjeff

    Hi David, thanks so much for doing this video. I'm new to chess and and just going through the study guides trying to take in as much as possible. I agree with the JasonGG that having summaries with bullets points throughout and at the end would be very helpful. I'm still a little unsure of what a open/closed position is.

    Thanks again for sharing you wisdom!

    -j

  • 12 months ago

    IM dpruess

    yeah, there's not much you can think about during a blitz game. pretty much you go on instinct. like many other aspects of chess, knowing how far or behind you are in development is something which can be internalized, and eventually used in your instincts during a blitz game.

  • 13 months ago

    Daybreak57

    I find that it is very difficult for me to apply these principles for the first time in speed chess so I guess I should start applying them in the long games I am playing.  Over the years in speed chess I just automatically learned to move fast without thinking because in speed chess time matters more than anything else so long as you keep an eye on your king.  I lost a couple games due to tactics I could have seen had I looked at the position more throughly.  I have to make a transition from speed chess to playing long games I guess.  I can see that this will be a good lesson for me because now I can practice looking for tactics in key moments of my games as well as take time to do counting, and determining if I should open up the game, or keep it closed, etc.  I still don't count, because it's hard to do in speed chess when you are not accustomed to doing it.  Normally you just do what comes naturally, and what comes naturally to me is to make moves without thinking in speed chess a lot of the time, which is why my rating is so low in speed chess.  So I'll practice counting in my long games, and remember to look for tactics, even in the opening!  I lost a crazy kings gambit game playing black!

  • 13 months ago

    Daybreak57

    I'm not that good of a chess player considering I have been playing for about 10 years.  I never thought about counting the amount of pieces I have in play, though I have been told it is a good idea in the past.  It seems helpful if you are playing a long game but I don't know how much time it would take to count pieces when you are playing 3 minute chess.  I gather a count as you move principle will be in order...  I'll try playing games focusing just on counting pieces in the opening game just to get the feel for it.  I'm sure it will help, but like I said I have to start doing it in order to find out.  I enjoyed learning the name "Fluid Position," because I've encountered this in many games and I didn't have a name for it.  I just called it, "Oh this is it can be either an open or closed position."  Nice to have a name for it, and I enjoyed the concepts covered about judging wheither or not it is good to take a pawn or not, very nice baiting tactic in the making!

  • 14 months ago

    IM dpruess

    glad you liked it, and that you will take the time to watch it again and think through it all to really absorb the ideas.

  • 14 months ago

    EmptyBelt

    Thank you for the informative video. I am really starting to see how calculating tempi can affect what moves you make in a closed/open game. I will have to watch this video again more times to fully get it all, but I have to say good video. Also thank you for clearing up that semi-open positons are just positions that lead to open positions. I look forward to learning more about "fluid opening games" that is a new concept to me.

  • 16 months ago

    IM dpruess

    what do you mean?

  • 16 months ago

    Ferrin123

    hey david do you do full lessons without gold or platinum memberships?

  • 20 months ago

    IM dpruess

    yeah, bullet point slides are a good addition to videos. this one was recorded very early on :-)

  • 20 months ago

    JasonGG

    Great video!  Keep them coming. :)  Adding a quick summary/recap slide with a few bullets at the very end might be a good addition. 

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