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  • 3 months ago


    I think Ke7 is as strong as Kc7 , but refraining from taking on b2 was the actual blunder. Also instead of Nxb2 ..Ne3 was still a sound alternative; g4 Rb4-f4 and black has enough counterplay to save the draw.

    In the second example ..Rc4 is just lovely. I think it is characteristic for Rapport , the optimist who always wants to attack he misses this Re3! resource.

  • 7 months ago


    thank you for the video!

  • 8 months ago


    Thank you Grandmaster.

  • 24 months ago


    That is some deep positional play ideas I can honestly say the exchange sac wouldn't have been one of my move candidates... which shows why I'm still a lower-rated player! Laughing

    Great instructive video as always Melik I enjoy watching your work Cool

  • 2 years ago


    Fabulous as always!

  • 2 years ago


    Makes my play look completely trivial. Many more please.

  • 2 years ago


    mmh,good.I like it.

  • 2 years ago


    mmh good,I like it.

  • 2 years ago


    Great teaching of ideas!

  • 2 years ago


    Clear and relevant,I like

  • 2 years ago


    Brilliant and crafty as usual  : )  ......play squares not material.....understanding the quality of the piece given a specific situations allows for a deeper and more effective play.....i will try and remember ......as delineated in game 2 example.....as for game 1 ....i read that Tal as a functional idea in the advanced states of the middle game never as a general idea thought that it was a good idea to move backward..passivity at the crucial hour...context is everything it seems  : )

  • 2 years ago


    really liked this video ... learned a lot!! tnx

  • 2 years ago


    You said to go to the weak side if you're losing and to the strong side if you're winning.  This makes sense because if the King is defending, it needs to go cover your weakness.  If your King is attacking, it needs to press your strength.

    But tell me, does this apply to symmetrical pawns?  What if both sides have a,b, e, f, g, and h pawns.  Should the king go to the e-f-g-h complex or the a-b pair?

  • 2 years ago


    this is actually awesome and i love it ,

  • 2 years ago


    good job

  • 2 years ago


    Well done.  I hope to reach that level of spatial understanding, recognizing when the squares take precendence over the material in such situations as your second example.

  • 2 years ago


    The exchange sacrifice is very interesting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


    BTW the board was switched around in the second example.

  • 2 years ago


    GM Melik

    I think the board was backwards in the second position :P

    THe notations on should have been hgfedcba and on the number side 87654321

  • 2 years ago


    We were discussing positional theories with my co-chess clubmate and when i got home, thanks for sharing this video. it gave me more understanding. thank you and more power!

  • 2 years ago


    Best chess teacher period.

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