Maroczy In Dutch With Tartakower

Maroczy In Dutch With Tartakower

GreenLaser
NM GreenLaser
Dec 6, 2008, 12:00 AM |
10 | Opening Theory

Geza Maroczy (1870-1951) was one of the best players in the world and Hungary's top player in the early 20th century. He was awarded the grandmaster title by FIDE based on past performance in 1950. He was skilled in all phases of the game, not just the eponymous opening idea known as the Maroczy Bind. Savielly Tartakower (1887-1956) was born in Rostov-on-Don in the Russian Empire. When he was 12 years old, his Polish-Jewish family moved to Austria-Hungary. Tartakower grew up in Vienna. He was graduated in law in Vienna and Geneva. His interest in chess developed and he became a strong player. After World War I, he moved to Paris and became a professional chess player and writer. In 1939, he played for Poland in the Chess Olympiad in Buenos Aires. Then World War II began and the Polish players and some other European players stayed in Argentina. Tartakower returned to Europe to join the Free French forces. He is known in for chess opening ideas and sayings. He could be quoted as saying, "I didn't say everything I said," because he is often quoted as saying things he did not say first or at all. However, that quote belongs to Yogi Berra. For the following game, Tartakower received the 3rd Brilliancy Prize in the tournament. It has been written that he did not deserve a higher prize because the combination was considered to deep to have been seen. This means that the judges believed it went beyond the realm of skill into the realm of luck. Here is Tartakower's best victory which was won against a great player with perhaps enough selected analysis to evaluate the judges' point.

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