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Bobby Fischer's "Dubrovnik" set was a "Minceta" version of the Dubrovnik...?

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Ninecastles
Suboseg wrote:

It is very difficult to determine from the pictures exactly what Fischer's set was like.

I think that the rook in Fischer's set is something between two Noj rooks, Minceta and Dubrovnik II.

But let me show you how robust the original Jakopovic rooks really are. For comparison, I use two different Jakopovic rooks and a typical plastic club set, because I think that everyone knows what such a set looks like:

I took the liberty of pasting "Fischers" Dubrovnik set over the NOJ "Minceta" & "Dubrivnik II" sets (with them being slightly transparent of coarse). I believe the results speak for themselves.

They are pretty much identical to the "Minceta" minus the angle difference! Also look at the Bishops top shape, they are identical in the Minceta version and too tear dropped in the Dubrovnik II set. Another similarity is the stems to the King and Queen...the Minceta's are as thick as Fischers where the Dubrovnik II's are slightly narrower. The Queens top is identical in the Minceta too...This was the actual point of this thread and I am glad you posted your opinions and point of views.

This is how we will definitively put this to rest...Yet this picture should again, validate the fact that his set was definitely a "Minceta" version of the Dubrovnik design. Unless you still think otherwise?

"Minceate" "Dubrovnik II"

AwesomeAtti

"Minceta" was a naming convention introduced by Noj and wouldn't have been used to describe any of the sets in the past.

It's believed Jakopovic may have been the manufacturer of the original Pero Pocek designed sets for the Olympiad. This suggests Jakopvic made various Dubrovnik styled sets. I think it's reasonable to assume he varied his sets over time (and I think this is what Noj tried to capture the essence of with their Minceta).

It seems likely that Jakopovic was the creator of the set that appeared on the cover of Life magazine (though your Fischer reference image does not appear to be this set... the set on the cover looks much more worn). This adds to the likelihood that Fischer owned multiple Jackopovic made sets, however, there is no photo evidence of him owning a set from the Olympiad and his interview can be interpreted in different ways so it may not be the most reliable source.

Great work!

DesperateKingWalk

Come on Fischer.... How many chess sets did you really need. grin

Ninecastles
AwesomeAtti wrote:

"Minceta" was a naming convention introduced by Noj and wouldn't have been used to describe any of the sets in the past.

It's believed Jakopovic may have been the manufacturer of the original Pero Pocek designed sets for the Olympiad. This suggests Jakopvic made various Dubrovnik styled sets. I think it's reasonable to assume he varied his sets over time (and I think this is what Noj tried to capture the essence of with their Minceta).

It seems likely that Jakopovic was the creator of the set that appeared on the cover of Life magazine (though your Fischer reference image does not appear to be this set... the set on the cover looks much more worn). This adds to the likelihood that Fischer owned multiple Jackopovic made sets, however, there is no photo evidence of him owning a set from the Olympiad and his interview can be interpreted in different ways so it may not be the most reliable source.

Great work!

As far as I know, the original 1950 sets were made in an unknown workshop, supposedly located in Serbia, and only 50 were produced. The original Dubrovnik II pieces were handmade in the Zagreb-based workshop of craftsman Vjekoslav Jakopovič. Yet, no one knows for sure whether Jakopovič himself or other craftsmen in his shop were the creators of the Dubrovnik II sets.

However, I agree with you that Jakopovič’s workshop was likely the creator of the set that appeared on the cover of Life magazine. I believe the set I used as an example was indeed the same set Fischer owned and that he only ever owned one Dubrovnik II (Minceta) set. Here is the complete photo of Bobby Fischer's Dubrovnik set, which clearly states at the bottom that this example is his set.

Whether Fischer really owned the original 1950s set or not is still up for debate, considering there are no photos of him with it. But if we were to take his word on it, he definitely did. Great stuff for sure AwesomeAtti !

Suboseg

That set you're comparing is a HOS copy, which in reality doesn't look as good as it does in that picture. At least judging by this review:

https://www.chess.com/forum/view/chess-equipment/review-house-of-staunton-1960-fischer-dubrovnik-chessmen

Suboseg

I personally think that Fischer's set was not the best of "Jakopovic". I think his set was a "regular" tournament set. Not something exclusive, made for special needs like this one:

But as I said, it cannot be determined exactly from the pictures what Fischer's set really was.

Ninecastles
Suboseg wrote:

I personally think that Fischer's set was not the best of "Jakopovic". I think his set was a "regular" tournament set. Not something exclusive, made for special needs like this one:

But as I said, it cannot be determined exactly from the pictures what Fischer's set really was.

Hi Suboseg,

I agree that Fischer’s set wasn’t the best Jakopovic had to offer, but it was a rare version due to the design of the rooks. The set you posted is definitely a rarer design than even Fischer’s set. As "ChessShark" will explain, the king with a cross in the Dubrovnik sets is very rare and beautifully crafted set! Here is a video about this design, breaking down the different Dubrovnik designs and highlighting the basic similarities and differences between the sets. "ChessShark" is one of the best authorities on Jakopovic designs and has some great videos on the do's and don'ts in Dubrovnik reproductions! Thanks for sharing and love the picture you posted! I would love a set like that....

Secrets of high quality vintage ("Jakopovic") Dubrovnik chess sets