Does anyone recognise the signature in this book inscription?

autobunny
EscherehcsE wrote:
autobunny wrote:
EscherehcsE wrote:
Daniel2340 wrote:
Bamboo58 wrote:

Thank you Quasimorphy 

I think you have found it!! I will research this person some more. Thanks again.

He died before the date on the signature

I noticed that, too. Very odd. Also, this source has the same date of death:

http://mlslegalscholarshipdatabase.law.unimelb.edu.au/biogs/3029b.htm

Day/month/year

Those crazy Aussies...

Actually most countries use this 😊

EscherehcsE
autobunny wrote:
EscherehcsE wrote:
autobunny wrote:
EscherehcsE wrote:
Daniel2340 wrote:
Bamboo58 wrote:

Thank you Quasimorphy 

I think you have found it!! I will research this person some more. Thanks again.

He died before the date on the signature

I noticed that, too. Very odd. Also, this source has the same date of death:

http://mlslegalscholarshipdatabase.law.unimelb.edu.au/biogs/3029b.htm

Day/month/year

Those crazy Aussies...

Actually most countries use this 😊

Well that's just crazy...or maybe I'm crazy...I know someone's gotta be crazy...

Gomer_Pyle

Purdy and Woinarski were about the same age playing in Australia from around the mid 1920s. They both played in the 1926 Australian Chess Championship, which was won by Purdy's father-in-law.

Here's a game between Purdy and Woinarski I found on the very interesting Melbourne Chess Club web page.
Melbourne Chess Club

 

Gomer_Pyle

Woinarski must have given the book to Purdy shortly before his death. It may have been a last gift to an old friend. They knew each other most of their lives.

jjupiter6
EscherehcsE wrote:

I've wasted probably 15 minutes trying to decipher the inscription. I got most of it, but what's the phrase after "happy memories"? Is it "of hard encounters"? (The guy had/has the absolute worst handwriting, lol.)

They both would have been elderly at that time, so their hands would not have been as steady as in their youths.

TackTick

To       C.J.S Purdy

     with compliments and many

      happy memories of past encounters.

                          SHZWoinarski

                                      6/1/73

Bamboo58

Thanks to all for your assistance. I am very sure we have the right person. His day job was a lawyer and perhaps a lecturer in law and eventually rose to a judge in the judicial system. He finished second in the Australian Chess Championship in 1926 and led for most of that tournament but not at the conclusion. It was said 'he appeared from nowhere" to achieve this result. He was a prominent player with some credible results in Australian chess circles at that time. According to one source "He believed that in chess one should seek, not correctness, but chances, and his vigorous style produced sparkling games during a few years of competitive play."

RussBell
Bamboo58 wrote:

Good point RussBell. New photo of inscription posted above. 

Thank you.  The suggestion by Gomer_Pyle regarding opening the image in the web browser can be accomplished in Chrome browser by right clicking on the image and selecting "Open Image In New Tab".  The image that opens in the new tab is an enlarged version of the original image.  Unfortunately I still do not recognize the signature in question.

Gomer_Pyle

Enlarging only helped me a little, hence my wild guesses at the name. I certainly wasn't getting Woinarski out of it but I have no doubts he's the right guy.